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,4TI0NAL BROADCASTING GOMP-' 

GENERAL LIBRARY 



/-J3-7U 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor13spon 



3 JANUARY 1989 
20< ■ copy • 93 a y*at 



PONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



KETV Delivers 
i^irst Place Time Periods 



in Omaha! 



* 



HBCGh 









First ... in 
quarter hours 
when all 3 
Omaha Stations 
compete ! 

First ... in 

Share of 

Audience, 

6 P.M. -Midnight, 

Sun. -Sat ! 



First ... in 
Omaha's choice 
of Movie 
Entertainment ! 



ONE-WEEK 

KETV l60l/ 2 

Station B 105 

Station C 135V2 

ONE-WEEK 

KETV 42.4 

Station B 27.2 

Station C 30.4 



FOUR-WEEK 

KETV 147 

Station B 130 

Station C 124 

FOUR-WEEK 

KETV 36.2 

Station B 31.8 

Station C 31.7 



Movie Masterpiece 

(Starts 9:35 P.M.) 
ONE-WEEK FOUR-WEEK 



(average) 
KETV 24.5 



(average) 

KETV 16.6 



9:35 Movie Cumulative rating: 70.6! 

Late Movie Cumulative rating: 40.4! 

Act promptly to buy minutes and breaks with ratings averaging in 
the upper 20s and 30s, adjacent to leading ABC-TV network shows 
and Omaha's highest-rated movies. 

♦Nov., '58, Metropolitan Omaha One-Week, Four-Week ARB. 

Call your | ]|J man today 



ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 



ten H. Cowdery, President 

ugene S. Thomas, V. P. & Gen. Mgr. 



^^H. 



ild Statin 



. 



KETV 
. 



CL^v•"C^'V^'^'\£Jc/ 



TEXAS STUDY 
HELPS RADIO 
"KNOW ITSELF' 

The Institute for Moti- 
vational Research Bete 
KPRC searching it- 
commercials and pro- 
grams for listener need- 



Page 25 



* 



un Drug battles 
discount houses 
with radio 

Page 30 

Spot radio's 
top clients: 
auto, beer, oil 

Page 32 

SPONSOR annual: 
successful tv 
campaigns 



Page 35 



7 



N PAGE 




Take TAE and 



PITTSBURGH'S 



MOST STIMULATING VIEW 



IS BREWED ON 



AJ1 



BIGmtMMj IN PITTSBURGH 



CHANNEL 



K 




7'A 



r 4 



^H&^+r^^^A 




/ 




LiROWlNG WIT 
PITTSBURGH' 

NAISSAN" 



'i 




WSB Farm Director Roy McMillan clasps trophy presented for Ga. Farm Bureau Federation by A & P's Harold Jackson (R1. J. P. Duncan, Jr., (L) is Federation president. 



Farm Service Award 

again goes to 
Atlanta's WSB Radio 

For three of the four years it has been offered, the Georgia 
Farm Bureau Federation trophy has gone to WSB Radio. 
The 1958 award was made in recognition of the station's 
"outstanding service to Georgia agriculture". 

Up-to-the-minute market reports, specialized news and 
information are the backbone of WSB Radio's farm pro- 
gramming. Georgia's farm families show their apprecia- 
tion by making WSB their most listened-to radio station. 




50,000 watts of service to Southern farmers 

WSB RADIO 

The Voice of the South -ATLANTA 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. NBC affiliate. Represented by Edw. Petry & Co. 
SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



' 




© Vol. 13, No. 1 



3 January 18S9 



SPONSOR 

THC WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/dADIO ADVERTISER* USC 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Motivational Research comes to radio 

25 What are the psychological needs of radio's audience? Will tomorrow's 
station satisfy them better? Results of a motivational study in Texas 

Spot radio results impress Wall Streeters 

28 Financial houses using radio during New York newspaper strike like the 
pull — even though it means unaccustomed night work at the office 

First flavor break-down of Parti-Day sales 

29 Analysis of first two months of Parti-Day in Green Bay tv test area 
shows strong movement for butterscotch, though fudge and chocolate lead 

Station organizes news tipsters 

30 Promotion by Denver radio station signs up over 2,000 KMYR Korrespon- 
dents, has them fighting to get there first in reporting local news 

Drug chain battles discount houses with radio 

30 Pittsburgh chain teams with premium stamp firm in joint radio promo- 
tion aimed at matching percentage increases of discount competitors 

How top clients use spot radio 

32 They employ it in a variety of ways, from straight sell to reminder 
copy, in 52-week drives and flights. Active clients: auto, beer, oil 

Life magazine joins the anti-rv attack 

33 Editorial in Luce publication's Entertainment issue follows same general 
"party-line" expressed in recent Fortune article, calls tv "sleazy" 

Television results — 1958 

35 sponsor presents its annual rundown of the year's most successful cam- 
paigns. Arranged alphabetically, here are 32 reasons for buying spot tv 

sponsor asks) How do you overcome the top-50 
market psychology? 

54 With many advertisers fueling that only top-50 market spot schedules 
are efficient buys, reps tell how they are selling the smaller markets 



FEATURES 

• Commercial Commentary 
49 Film-Scope 
22 49th and Madison 
•O News t Idea Wrap-Up 

A Newsmaker of the Week 
•O Picture Wrap-Up 
58 Radio Basics 



82 Sponsor Hears 

13 Sponsor-Scope 

88 Sponsor Speaks 

88 Ten-Second Spots 

20 Timebuyers at Work 

88 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

51 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Edlter 

John E. McMillin 
News Editor 
Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 
Alfred J. Jaffa 
Senior Editors 
W. F. Milcsch 
Jane Pinkerton 
Harold Hazelton 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 
Gwen Smart 

Western Editor (Los Angeles) 
Marjorle Ann Thomas 
Film Editor 
Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 
Pat* Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Edlter 
loe Ctida 
Art Edlter 
Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskkl, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 



[NT 



ADVERTISING DEPAR' 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 
Sandra Lee Oncay, Asit. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Okan, Office Manager 

Dorris Bowers 

George Becker 

Laura Datre 

Priscilla Hoffman 

Jessie Ritter 



Member of Butiness Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th fc> Madison) Nfftw Yark 17, N. Y. Tela 
phone: MUrray Hill 1-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SVeertar 7-9863 
Birmingham Office: Tewn House. Birmingham 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6887 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Holly w ood 4-8899 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Betnmere 11, 
Md. Subscription*: U.S. S3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Staffh) copies 20c. Printed hi U.LA. 
Addraas all cotTeeseudeeee to 40 E. 4Mb St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 1-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications lac. ItHeted aa 
2nd clans matter an 29 January 1948 at the Balti- 
more postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

©1958 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island, Illinois 

47th TV MARKET IN THE U.S 



As Reported in TELEVISION AGE, May 19, 1958 

41 Albany Schenectady-Troy 46 Omaha 

42 Nashville 

43 Champaign 

44 Miami 

45 Sacramento-Stockton 



47 Davenport-Rock Island 



48 Binghamton 

49 Raleigh-Durham 

50 Asheville 



WOC-TV IS No. 1 IN COVERAGE 
IN THIS 47th MARKET 



1,727,100 

556,500 

469,890 

97,101 

54,912 



48 COUNTIES 
Population* 
Homes 
TV Homes 
Farm Homes** 
TV Farm Homes** 
Effective Buying Income* $2,852,363,000 
Retail Sales* $2,076,120,000 

* Sales Management's "Survey of Buying Power, 1958" 
**U. S. Census of Agriculture, 1954 



Col. B. J. Palmer 
President 

Ernest C. Sanders 

Resident Manager 

Pax Shaffer 

Sales Manager 



NCS 2 




BETTENDORF 

ROCK ISLAND 
MOLINE 
EAST MOLINE 



IOWA 



WISCONSIN 




ILLINOIS 



WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is part of Central Broadcasting Company which 
also owns and operates WHO-TV and WHO-Radio — Des Moines. 




SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 




SERGEANT 
PRESTON 

of the 

YUKON 

Leads the 

Rating Race 
in Market 

after Market! 



BALTIMORE 










31.3 

...19.8 


Pulse, 
May, 


SERGE 

High\A^ 
Silent S 
Sea Hui 
State Tr 


ANT PRESTON 

1 Patrol 


1958 


ervice 

it 

ooper 


15.3 
14.8 
12.8 











CLEVELAND 



Pulse, 
March, 
1958 



ARB, 
Jan., 

1958 



WINSTON-SALEM 



ARB, 
April, 
1958 



NEW YORK 



Arbitron, 
9/25/58 



PROVIDENCE 



Pulse, 

Jan., 

1958 



SERGEANT PRESTON 22.2 

Sheriff of Cochise 18.2 

Sea Hunt 17.9 

State Trooper 17.5 

Honeymooners 15.2 

■ = 

SERGEANT PRESTON 29.4 

Honeymooners 23.6 

Whirlybirds 22.5 

Sea Hunt 18.8 

Highway Patrol 12.3 

SERGEANT PRESTON 27.3 

Sea Hunt 22.5 

Adventure Scott Island 17.3 

Gray Ghost 12.4 

Silent Service 4.8 

SERGEANT PRESTON 16.6 

State Trooper 14.5 

Highway Patrol 9.6 

Silent Service 6.4 

Sheriff of Cochise 3.6 

SERGEANT PRESTON 29.8 

Harbor Command 27.3 

Highway Patrol 25.8 

Silent Service 21.8 

Twenty-Six Men 19.3 



1 SYR/ 


irn<;F I 






36.3 

.. .34.9 


ARB, 
Feb., 


SERGEANT PRESTON 

Silent Service 


1958 


Sea Hunt 

Sheriff of Cochise 

Highway Patrol 


31.7 

21.9 

.21.5 







I 

T 
C 



1 NDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 



CORPORATION 

488 Madison Ave. • NY. 22 • PLaza 5-2100 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This week, with the air media and particularly radio facing 
a I\eiv Year that's filled ivith many unsolved problems 
and the urgent need for energetic decisions, a veteran sta- 
tion representative ivith a 26-year background in radio 
and tv takes over an important industry command post. 

The newsmaker: H. Preston Peters, chairman of the 
hoard of Peters. Griffin & Woodward, who this week became presi- 
dent of the Station Representatives Association. 

Illinois-born and Amherst-educated "Pete" Peters brings to the 
SRA job a wealth of impressive industry experience. His knowledge 
of radio and radio stations dates back to June 1932, when he joined 
Free & Sleiniger. a Chicago representative firm. He opened their 
New York office the following year and the company became Free 
& Peters in 1936. 

His firm (the name was changed 
to Peters, Griffin & Woodward in 
1956) has been associated with 
the development of such outstand- 
ing stations as WHO, Des Moines; 
WGR, Buffalo; WDAY, Fargo: 
WMBD. Peoria; WOC, Davenport; 
KMBC, Kansas City, Mo. and 
many others. When PGW cele- 
brated its 25th anniversary last 
year, the party was attended by 
seven station clients who had been 
with the firm since 1932. 

Peters was one of the first advo- H. Preston Peters 

cates of the exclusive representa- 
tion idea, and' one of the first (1947) to form completely separate 
radio and tv departments in a representative firm. 

As the new president of SRA, Peters will head up an association 
of 19 radio and tv representative firms, organized to deal with such 
matters as industry sales, trade practices, a representative's code and 
the various legal and legislative problems of the business. 

Among the plans now being formulated at SRA are an all-industry 
sales push, using special 10-second spots by station clients of SRA 
firms, new broader research on radio coverage and penetration, and 
an extensive trade campaign to sell radio and tv to advertisers and 
agencies. The need for stepped-up pressure behind spot radio has 
been the subject of several recent SRA meetings, and spot radio will 
undoubtedly be a major concern of the Peters' administration. 

Peters, who is described by his associates at PGW as "warm, 
sincere, loyal and a stickler for perfection!" was one of the founders 
of SRA. He is married to Virginia Church Peters, daughter of 
Arthur Church, radio pioneer of KMBC, Kansas City, Mo. ^ 




SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



■I ■••-. 



VIGORO 
EXPANDING 

►■-.-J. . Sg ^^?^^r'^53P"*™Pr 



3.1 .TO5 



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Mi 



5848} 




Get more business in this key port 

on the great St. Lawrence Seaway through 

WICU-TV 



CHANNEL 12 

Affiliated with NBC & ABC Networks 

One of America's top markets, Erie stands well 
above average in effective buying income. 
Above average also in food, drug and 
automotive sales. One medium sells the 
Greater Erie market completely — WICU-TV. 
marking its tenth anniversary of service 
to 380,400 television homes. 

A tremendous industrial center— with 348 
plants producing over $500,000,000 in 
manufactured products annually — Erie leads 
in growth-rate among Pennsylvania's big cities. 
And that growth will be accelerated by the 
St. Lawrence Seaway. Find out how 
WICU-TV is helping major advertisers 
get more business in this expanding market. 
Your Blair man has the facts. Ask him. 



fffecttve Jan mni1 

Wicv TV J *> J!> *> 

l an »ounces 
hea PPoh, tme „ tof 







The nation's top city for 
greatest gain in business, 
and the area served by its 
two television stations. 



WySt 

channel 3 
see KOLLINGBERY, 



fJTil 

ctffllinel m n 
see KATZ 










by John E. McMillin 




Commercial 



commentary 



Flesh, blood, and a corporate image 

Madison Avenue, in its infinite wisdom, comes 
up with some of the damnedest catchwords. 

The Advertising Catchword of 1958 was easily 
the over-worked word "image." And I submit 
that "image" is a very lousy word. 

Lousy because it seems so superficial, external, 
spurious, like a reflection instead of reality. And 
because, as used by certain glib, brash, free- 
wheeling young admen it smacks of dishonesty and charlatanism. 

To hear them talk you'd think that an "image" was a kind of 
crafty cosmetic, to be pasted down on the face or a brand, or a 
product, or a corporation like lipstick, mascara, or false eyelashes. 

This, of course, is nonsense. No image is worth a hoot unless it is 
truly an "outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace." 
But the word has been so confused and abused that maybe it will pay 
us to take a quick look at a few forgotten pages of advertising his- 
tory, to see what it really means, and how it originated. 

Two old theories of advertising 

First of all, this preoccupation with "images" is comparatively 
new in the ad business. It dates back less than 20 years. 

During the depression-ridden '30s, most of us in the creative end 
of advertising were bedevilled by two quite different concepts. 

The first was the Readership (or Listenership) theory, advocated 
by the more florid admirers of Drs. Starch and Gallup. The sec- 
ond, which reached its finest flowering in the rise and success of the 
Ted Bates agency, was the Central Sales Point concept. 

The Readership-Listenership boys (Y&R was rife with them in 
those days) held that the first, in fact almost the only, job of adver- 
tising was to get itself seen and heard. Pursuing this idea, they 
devoted nearly all their creative energies to devising tricks of pres- 
entation and illustration which would insure high noting, readership 
and listening for their copy. 

Opposing them were the logical thinkers of the Central Sales Point 
school. Those flinty philosophers argued that the first job of 
advertising was to sell, and that to sell you needed certain rules. 

Chief of these rules was that you had to have one clear, compelling 
sales argument, or Central Sales Point in each piece of copy. 

Different agencies called this Central Sales Point by different 
names. Bates' USP (Unique Selling Proposition) was probably the 
best known. But most big agencies had their own variations. 

Now actually both the Readership-Listenership theory and the 
Central Sales Point concept represented considerable advances over 
many previous advertising practices. And both demonstrated that 
they could sell against sloppy, confused competition. 

But along about 1940 a mysterious thing began to happen. There 
arose, in any quarters, a kind of ground swell of opposition to both 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 







"Imagin' 



me goin' ta collidge!" WJAR-TV made nationwide headlines recently when it 
initiated a live TV course on the history and philosophy of communism. Full 
academic credit was given by Providence College and enthusiastic letters poured 
in. Daring, imaginative, unorthodox local programming like this is the biggest 
single reason why WJAR-TV consistently 
walks off with the lion's share of the 

audience in the Providence Market. Cock-of-the-walk in the PROVIDENCE MARKET 

NBC • ABC • Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 




WJAR-TV 



CHANNEL 10 




SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



VARIETY 



Commercial commentary continued 







because it stands to reason 

that all listeners do not prefer the 

same thing. 

Therefore, in order to best 
serve "most of the people most 
of the time," KOA-Radio 
adds variety to every phase of 
broadcasting. 

There's great variety in 
entertainment as KOA combines the 
best of network shows with 
popular local programs. Variety 
in style and presentation 
distinguishes KOA's news 
coverage and public service 
programming. The appeal 
of talented variety in personalities 
is evidenced by KOA's loyal, 
responsive audiences. 

Variety in programming can help 
you sell more effectively, too. 
On KOA-Radio, your sales 
message is unmistakably yours . . . 
individualized and delivered 
to create immediate 
sales action! 



Represented nationally by 

Henry I. 
Christal Co., Inc. 




'/si 



,N,B.C. 



KO 

DENVER/ 

One of America's great radio stations 

850 on your dial 
50,000 Watts 






theories. It was as if advertisers all over the country began saying to 
their agencies, "There are more things in heaven and earth than are 
dreamt of in your copy formulas, Horatio." 

A new third dimension 

I first heard these rumblings in 1942 when I was at Compton. P&G 
suddenly began complaining that the ads we were doing for Ivory 
Soap did not have what they called "The Ivory Personality." 

Their complaints brought outraged howls from various agency 
personnel. "Those dumb little jerks in Cincinnati don't know good 
advertising when they see it," growled an apoplectic account man. 

"What do they mean by personality?" squeaked a print copy- 
writer. "We're giving them the same high readership that Cannon 
Mills are getting." But older, wiser agency heads (you need them 
with P&G business I decided that we'd better try to understand the 
client. And from our work on the Ivory Personality we found a 
new "third dimension" of advertising. 

This "third dimension" goes beyond mere sales arguments, 
though these are important. And it is not the same as the tricks of 
advertising craftsmanship which attract attention and build interest. 

The third dimension is the essential nature of the product (or 
corporation) itself. Personality doesn't describe it very well. The 
old-fashioned word "character" is much better. And this character 
is a combination of what the brand or company is, and how its chief 
executives think about it. 

P&G. for instance, has or had certain definite ideas and attitudes 
about Ivory Soap. These attitudes were reflected in the way the 
product was made, packaged, priced, merchandised, and sold. They 
were quite different than its feeling about Duz or Tide. And though 
unwritten and almost never voiced, they were always present, 
consciously or subconsciously, in the minds of P&G executives. 

Our studies of the "Ivory Personality" showed that every time an 
Ivory ad (print or air) violated this character by word, layout, pic- 
ture, color, type, voice, logo, design, or feeling, it made P&G uneasy, 
though they could seldom explain why. Similarly, any ad which truly 
reflected the essential character of Ivory Soap received an almost 
automatic O.K. 

What has all this to do with "images?" Well, the interest in brand 
or corporate personalities gave rise to the modern image concept. 

Not all advertisers or agencies were equally fascinated. Bates, for 
example, has clung sturdily to its USP, and has pretty much dis- 
regarded personalities. But. during the past 10 years, particularly, 
such agencies as Ogilvy, Benson & Mather have given great currency 
to the image idea. 

Image itself is a research word. When you try to measure the im- 
pact of brand or corporate personalities on consumers, you come up 
with the idea of an image. That's one reason for its weakness. 

For the true character of a company or product is not what it 
seems, but what it is. And advertising's responsibility is to discover, 
define and project this essential "is-ness" — not to create illusions. 

The job itself is difficult. It takes real thought and insight and 
great creative skill. 

But it is easily the most stimulating part of advertising or public 
relations. For, when it is well done, it is more than a gaudy reflec- 
tion. It is both a banner and a challenge for the company itself. ^ 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 




Two ways to get them up to their ears in commercials 



Some commercials build up resistance . . . others 
build up sales. 

The differences — all the way from failure to 
middling success to real success— are evidence of 
the creative selling ability of your advertising 
agency. 



Young & Rubicon, Inc. 
Advertising 



New York • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • tos Angeles • Hollywood • Montreal • Toronto • london • Mexico City • Frankfurt • San Juan • Caracas 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY L959 





/MO 

;sW*o CALLS . . . 



THi 

LAW 
AN! 

I OWN 
TOO TOUGH 



IMPORTANT 



v~ 




>i 



Superior production, perceptive 
costing, knowledgeable direction and 
tight writing 

—BILLBOARD 



has shot its way into the 
Nielsen bigtime . . 

—RADIO DAILY 



kept me at my set right 
through the commercial! . . . Crisply 
and believably written!" 

San Francisco CALL BULLETIN 



one of the best of the new 
Western crop." 

—BILLBOARD 




starring 



Pat Conway 




ON ABC FOR ONE YEAR! 



BEAT Dinah Shore Chevy Show. . 7 times in 8 surveys 



OUTSTANDING RATINGS IN 
MARKETS LARGE AND SMALL 



BEAT I Love Lucy . . . 
BEAT The Californians 

BEAT Pat Boone 

BEAT Bob Cummings. 
BEAT U. S. Steel Hour 
BEAT Person to Person 



13 times in 13 surveys! 
12 times in 13 surveys! 
11 times in 13 surveys! 
11 times in 13 surveys! 
11 times in 13 surveys! 
10 times in 13 surveys! 



Detroit 



ARB. July '58 



Cincinnati 



ARB, Feb. 58 



id always BEAT Suspicion, George Gobel, Colt. 45, 
Welk's Top Tunes, Eddie Fisher, Your Hit Parade, etc. 

Nielsen, Oct. '57 thru Apr. '58 



Seattle Tacoma 



ARB. Apr. '58 



San Diego 



Pulse. Aug. '58 



Lubbock 



ARB. Apr. '58 



San Antonio 



Pulse, Mar. '58 



Baltimore 



ARB. Sep 



Portland, 



ARB. June 



Los Angeles 



ARB. Mar. '58 



multi-city buying is in fashion, too 

Norfolk jackets are the last word in menswear fashion, but buying WGAL-TV's low-cost 
multi-city coverage is an established custom. This pioneer station is first with viewers in 
Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, and numerous other cities including: Reading, Gettysburg, 
Hanover, Lebanon, Chambersburg, Lewistown, Carlisle, Shamokin, Waynesboro. 




♦ ♦ 



STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 




^y 



316,000 WATTS 



GAIi-TV 

CHANNEL 8 • Lancaster, Pa. • NBC and CBS 

Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. • New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

America's 10th TV Market • 942,661 TV households • $3% billion annual retail sales • $6 2 /3 billion annual income 

Lancaster . Harrisburg . York • Reading • Gettysburg . Hanover . Lebanon . Chambersburg . Waynesboro . Lewistown . Sunbury 
Carlisle • Pottsville • Shamokin • Lewisburg • Hazleton . Wit. Carmel . Bloomsburg • Hagerstown . Frederick . Westminster 



12 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 






Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy reader* 



V SPONSOR-SCOPE 



3 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Madison Avenue's managerial and planning outlook — in contrast to a year ago — 
is very rosy indeed. 

With practically all factors in the economy on the hotsy-totsy side, the flow of adver- 
tising dollars is expected to produce a record year. 

However, the trend toward the reevaluation of media, requiring changing accommo- 
dations hy the seller, will be sharper and more diverse than they were even in 1958. 

Here are the more significant anticipations for the new year emerging from 
SPONSOR-SCOPE's annual prospect-polling along the Avenue: 

• It will be a bigger year than ever for tv specials. Advertisers have learned to use 
them as effective spearheads for their campaigns and special promotions — the way they 
once used the Sunday supplements and magazines. In other words, tv definitely has smashed 
what had been a monopoly for print. 

• The trend in network tv toward flexibility will continue to grow, with the op- 
portunity-buy becoming a fixed feature of the medium. 

• Regardless of how ARC TV fares with its home count, daytime tv — because of its cost 
efficiency — will take on more and more "meat-and-potatoes" attractiveness. 

• The tv networks will continue to change the ground rules on ways of buying, 
product protection, and discounts — adding to the headaches of competitive media. 

• Spot tv will strengthen its competitive position by further easements in its ratecard 
structure, creating cost-per weapons that will keep it smartly competitive with the net- 
works. 

• Favoring spot as a whole will be the continuing tendency among many national 
advertisers to center their fire on problem and opportunity markets. 

• There'll be more and more research concentration on the qualitative import of 
tv commercials. (See page 15, 20 December 1958 SPONSOR-SCOPE for likely directions.) 

• National spot radio may find itself fighting off a price squeeze because of tough- 
er competition with other media. The escape hatch: a realistic appraisal of its role as an 
entertainment-service medium; its values, place and uses in the advertiser's marketing mix; 
and its unique effectiveness as a promotion and merchandising prop. 

• Availability of tv properties that can contend with the westerns will be the 
No. 1 headache for network sponsors. Personalities who can head up a weekly show 
and deliver topnotch audiences will be at a greater premium than ever. 

• This will be the year when agencies will pluck up their courage to charge fees for 
marketing services now that the ANA crusade to build a compensation and services frame- 
work has bogged. More agencies — a la McCann-Erickson — will spin off their marketing 
departments into autonomous units. N 



Despite the limited holidays activities, renewals on national spot tv kept coming 
in this week at an encouraging pace. 

Lever took the week's lead with renewals for Dove, Pepsodent, and other brands. 
Meantime there also was action from American Tobacco and Philip Morris. 

The Morris arrangement via Burnett was on a corporate level, involving all the brands 
but Parliament, which B&B is handling itself. 

Radio renewals included: 

Pall Mall (SSCB) and Sinclair, on a pro tern basis. 

P.S.: Lydia Pinkham (Cohen & Aleshire) is going on a 22-week schedule. 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



13 



** SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

! ' r v-i' 

Ford will be breaking loose in early February with a spurt of tv buying via 
JWT. 

It will pick up a batch of network shows for eight to 13 weeks — one or two of them 
high-raters out on loan. 

Lots of tv spot also is in the offing. 

Something that the 4 October SPONSOR-SCOPE (page 17) predicted would 
be the next big turn among agencies loaded with tv and radio materialized at 
Y&R this week. 

The move at Y&R in its various parts: 

1) Pete Levathes, who had been director of media relations, will function both as 
head of tv/radio buying and director of the radio/tv programing department, 

with William Mountain moving out of the latter post to become director of new business. 

2) Y&R media buying is reverting to the system that prevailed in the early '50s, with 
air media separate from other media. A director is to be appointed for print and outdoor. 
The guess is that it will be Henry Sparks. 

Why some of the more astute analysts among top agency management have been pre- 
dicting the course that Y&R has taken : 

(a) Because of the complexity of air media, the air media specialist must divorce him- 
self from the print perspective, with which he actually has little in common. 

(b) As the stakes in tv get bigger, the tv media experts — being essentially a businessman 
— must be placed in strategic control of the flow of the dollar not only into media 
but into programing which has ceased to be an agency creative function. 

Watch for the tobacco giants to make their next product move in the direc- 
tion of tobacco-wrapped cigarettes as a result of the quick success of Trend. 

This cigarette, wrapped in homogenized tobacco, has a price edge on its paper-wrapped 
brotherhood by virtue of the fact it's taxed as a cigar and not as a cigarette. 

It's been getting the switch-smokers' business — i.e., those that use both cigars and 
cigarettes. 

American Tobacco is reported already at work on a competitive brand. 

Marketingmen in the hard goods field look to 1959 as the year when the dis- 
count houses will be accepted, though reluctantly, by the giant manufacturers as respect- 
able members of the retailing world. 

They feel this could affect advertising from two directions. 

1) The outbreak of an intensive squeeze on prices. 

2) A price war of sustained dimensions between department stores and discount 
houses. 

One major reason why the giants will toss in the sponge: They can't depend on tht 
new liberal Congress to support any fair trade efforts. 

Here are a couple of items to bring you up to date on what happened to ra 
dio listening last summer. 

ITEM NO. 1: Pulse says out-of-home listening reached a new high during th< 
summer of 1958, adding 28.3% to in-home listening, compared to 25.7% the year before. 

ITEM NO. 2: At the request of SPONSORSCOPE, Nielsen computed the averagi 
hours of radio usage per-home per-day for last July as compared to the follow 
ing October. The breakdown, which also covers 1956 and 1957, looks like this: 
TEAR OCTOBER JULY 

1958 1 hour; 56 minutes 1 hour; 49 minutes 

1957 1 hour; 54 minutes 1 hour; 49 minutes 

1956 2 hours; 1 minute 1 hour; 59 minutes 

P.S.: Nielsen's Radio Index had nothing on tap re outdoors, but it is working on 
something special in that area. 

14 SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



You can expect the trend toward agency mergers to take on even more mo- 
mentum during the next 12 months. 

Some agency prophets are predicting that within the next 10 years as much as 90% 
of all agency business will be administered by about 40 firms. 
The basic factors that motivate the trend toward mergers: 

• The required amount of working capitals keeps getting greater in ratio to billings 
handled. 

• Clients are demanding more and more services; to buttress these with top-grade man- 
power, the agency needs a lot of income. 

• The cost of accounting keeps going up, and it's about as cheap to handle $40 million 
as $20 million. 

Among the outstanding mergers of the past four months (see 30 August SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE for mergers since 1 January 1958) were these: 



MERGED 

C. L. Miller; Buchanan; L&N 
Gardner; Paris & Peart 
Geyer; Morey, Humm & Warwick 
Donahue & Coe; Keyes, Madden & Jones 
J. R. Pershall: Reach, McClinton 
Emil Mogul; Lewin, Williams, Saylor 
Atherton & Currier; Kastor, FC&C 
North; Silverstein & Goldsmith 





BILLINGS 


NEW NAME 


(millions) 


Lennen & Newell 


$83 


Gardner 


35 


Geyer, Morey, Madden & Ballard 


30 


(Working agreement only) 


50 


Reach, McClinton & Pershall 


20 


Mogul, Lewin, Williams & Saylor 


18 


Kastor, Hilton. CC & Atherton 


18 


North 


15 



The new AFTRA code has been all wrapped up by the union and network 
negotiators and ratification by AFTRA members is expected by 12 January. 

An innovation in the code are the videotape commercial rates. Basic fees: $93 for first 
use; $248 for the first three uses and $818 for use over the first 13 weeks. 

Bekins Van & Storage, one of the West's most consistent year-around users of radio, 
has decided to up its budget and swing most of its advertising weight to tv. 

The buy, via LaRoche, covers the West Coast and reaches as far east as Houston, 
Dallas, and Kansas City. 

The Station Representatives Association via Price & Waterhouse is doing about 
$14-million worth of examining on its estimate of national spot radio billings for 
1957. 

SRA had estimated the figure for that year as $183,987,000. Data released over the year- 
end by the FCC put 1957's national spot radio gross at $169,511,000. 

That makes quite a contrast with how things turned out for 1956: The SRA's 
estimate was just $400,000 over the FCC figure of $149.5 million. 

(See News Wrap-Up, page 62, for details of the FCC's radio money report for '57.) 



The soap giants are winding up 1958 with Lever amassing the most first places in 



the various categories of the business. 
The rankings are as follows: 

CATEGORY BRAND 

Package high-suds detergent Tide 

Package low-suds detergent all 

Household cleanser Ajax 

Toilet soap Ivory 

Heavy-duty liquid detergent Wisk 

Light-duty liquid detergent Lux 

All-purpose liquid detergent Lestoil 



COMPANY 

P&G 

Lever 

Colgate 

P&G 

Lever 

Lever 

Adell Chemical 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



15 




16 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



For the first time the tv networks will have three full-hours Lucking one another 
when CBS TV installs Rawhide into the Friday 8-9 p.m. stretch 9 January. 

The contending hour programs, each starting at 8, are Disney Presents (ABC TV) and 
Ellery Queen (NBC TV). 

Pharmaceuticals and Lever will sponsor portions of Rawhide. 

Incidentally, this raises the total number of network westerns to 25. 

It looks as though CBS Radio's daytime schedule will be pretty well buttoned 

up with business for the first quarter of 1959. 

The past week's count of new business included Sterling Drug, three units for 13 
weeks; California Packing, 20 units for seven weeks; Lever's Surf, seven units a week for 
13 weeks; and Mutual of Omaha, 11 Impacts and five news periods a week for eight weeks. 

What probably gave New York admen more of a kick than many other holiday 
presents was the special airmail delivery to their homes of the Sunday edition of 
Philadelphia Inquirer on the Christmas weekend (postage: $1.40). 

The benefactor was the Triangle stations, which had been feeding the same agency 
people with daily copies of the Inquirer during the 19-day New York newspaper strike (the 
Inquirer is in the Triangle family). The nine New York dailies resumed publication Mon- 
day (29). 

ASCAP has offered radio stations a year's extension of the license which ex- 
pired 31 December at the same rates. 

The All-Industry Committee, which had been negotiating with the Society for a renewal, 
pulled out of discussions a couple weeks ago when it found that ASCAP was not agreeable 
to a rate reduction. 

As permitted under the Government consent decree, the All-Industry Committee, rep- 
resenting about 600 stations, will apply to the Federal court for the desired decrease. 

ASCAP says it will counter with a bid for an increase. 

BBDO is one agency that's earnestly pressing the case for radio. 
Its 1958 network radio billings were 40% over the 1957 level and the margin 
of increase for spot radio was not far behind. 

However, the media rank and file that carry radio's story to BBDO's topside and to clients 
think that the medium ought to replenish its reservoir of positive selling with some 
updated weapons, such as these: 

RADIO'S ROLE: For the large advertiser, it can be a supplementary medium which 
offers at low cost an extension of the tv and print audience and the sort of frequency 
that spells inimitable reminder impact. For the small advertiser, it adds to his glamour 
via dealer tie-ins and local promotion and advertising. For both, it's an economic tool 
for testing new products and copy platforms. 

FLEXIBBUTY: Show that radio is flexible in the full sense of the word; that 
spasmodic advertisers are as welcome as they are in newspapers and that there's a place 
for them in the discount structure. 

PROGRAMING: Look for new formats which stress service mixed with entertain- 
ment and allow for five-minute items that are built to turn over audiences. 

DECORUM : Avoid the "carnival" atmosphere and other short-sighted devices. Streps 
the quality and values of the station's personality and audience and the distinct en- 
tertainment-service role it performs in its community. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 51; sponsor Hears, page 52; 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 66; and Film-Scope,. page 49. 

SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



SURE 
EVERY 
TIMEBUYER 
READS 
SPONSOR . 



I J 



z 



t 

1 




every time buyer 
reads 



SOR 




m^ 



BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency /advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS — listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any other 
book in the field. 



PONSOR 



-i- 



sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 




Though XV gets a Kick 
From assuming this pose, 
He feels it's immodest 

To wear so few clothes! 

Of course, it's false modesty. Noth- 
ing can really cover up KHJ 
Radio's foreground sound. It's 
been winning agency and client 
friends for more than 36 years. And 
the New Year promises to be no 
exception. 

1959 is still a babe in arms, but 
KHJ Radio, Los Angeles, is an old 
hand at building cumulative audi- 
ence through programs beamed at 
the wide variety of mature, adult 
tastes that make up America's 2nd 
market. 

KHJ's listener loyalty to both pro- 
grams and advertisers proves that 
auld acquaintance is not forgot. 
(And neither is the loyalty of our 
auld advertisers at renewal time.) 

The naked truth is that KHJ's 
Foreground Sound is programmed 
to satisfy the variety of tastes that 
make up the Greater Los Angeles 
area. 



KHJ 

RADIO 

LOS ANGE LES 

1313 North Vine Street 
Hollywood 28, California 
Represented nationally by 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 







at work 







Robert H. Boulware, Bryan Houston, Inc., vice pres. and associate 
media director, believes that "Anyone who wants to become a good 
media buyer should have certain qualifications to start with. He 
should have an understanding of and feeling for figures, not be 
thrown by statistics. He should have a curiosity about markets from 
the geographic concept of the word 
to the sociological. He also needs 
to know basic marketing informa- 
tion. When he is fully trained, the 
all-media buyer to whom you say 
"Albuquerque' or 'Rochester' will 
immediately think of those mar- 
kets not only in terms of mail 
coverage, but also in terms of the 
number and kinds of grocery and 
drug retail outlets in those areas, 
income, consumer habits. When 
such information is not at his 
fingertips, he knows where to get it." Trainees at Houston begin with 
some basic research assignments to familiarize them with sources. 
Later they're encouraged to attend as many meetings and presenta- 
tions as possible. "The education of a good media buyer never ends." 



Mort Reiner, Hicks & Greist, Inc., New York, feels that children's 
tv shows cannot be bought solely on the basis of ratings. "Among 
the important factors which ratings cannot possibly indicate," Mort 
says, "are the selling ability of the talent or personality, the age 
level which the program's format appeals to, and whether the partic- 
ular show is oversold — i.e. are 
there so many commercials on the 
show that the star cannot do a 
good job even if he wants to? We 
also place a great deal of emphasis 
on merchandisability of the per- 
sonality — how he cooperates with 
personal appearances at the point 
of sale and whether he is accepted 
enthusiastically by the trade. 
Finally, and most important, how 
does he pull in a test promotion? 
Nothing, but nothing, is as good 
a yardstick of sales as the concrete evidence of label returns, coupons, 
contest entries and premium orders." Mort says that many times 
low-rated programs have out-pulled shows with five times the ratings 
in terms of product sold. "So analyze your children's shows carefully. 




+ k 



20 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 







««•»• 









...while 
tlie store 
was closed! 

On a Sunday afternoon in Cleveland, (November 30, 1958) Bill Randle started his regular 5 hour 
Sunday radio show playing the "Christmas Sing-Along with Mitch" album . . . and asked for 
telephone orders. His sponsor was the Higbee Company, Cleveland's leading department store. 
When the show was over, 2,390* albums had been sold, giving the Higbee Music Center its 
biggest day in 1958-AND THE STORE WASN'T EVEN OPEN. Proving again that in Cleveland 



SUCCESS IS ON 



WERE 



CLEVELAND 

RICHARD M. KLAUS, VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER /REPRESENTED BY VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL, INC. 



Announcing the appointment of 

ARTHUR 

M. 
SWIFT 

Manager of 

WTCN RADIO 




WTCN Kadio and Television Stations 

^-RoLsT,NOCOMP^ . ABC TELEVISION 



ON NETWORK 



I S I D I A H Y OF 



PHIL R. HOFFMAN 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
GENERAL MANAGER 



• I M E . INC 



2925 DEAN BOULEVARD 
M.NNEAPOLIS 16 MINNESOTA 



December 29, 1958 



1 



Agency Time Buyers 
Everywhere 

Arthur VlJS'liHoOMV if" 
Uia appointment to this ne«ly "eated 

Manager of WTCN Radio. 



MINNEAPOLIS 
ST. PAUL 



WTCN RADIO 



Affiliate American Broadcasting Network • Represented by the Kate Age« 




49th ai 
Madisc 



22 



Fortune furor 

In light of the recent criticism in 
Fortune Magazine, I thought you 
might be interested in this favorable 
comment on television in answer to 
the Fortune article contained in the 
editorial, "What's the Matter with 
TV?" This was published in the 
Topeka State Journal on Thursday, 
December 4. 

I hope you agree that this is a 
good endorsement of the tv industry. 

Thad M. Sandstrom 

gen. mgr., WWW, WIBW-TV 

Topeka, Kans. 

"It's not likely any viewer has 
tossed his receiver into the ashcan be- 
cause of Fortune magazine's latest 
criticism of the television industry 
and its programing. . . . 

"If any barometer records the state 
of health of television, controversies 
in which it is continually embroiled 
are as good as any. They indicate a 
wide, intense interest in what the 
medium is doing or will do. . . . 

"Allegations brought by Fortune 
and other critics may be well founded. 
On the other hand, defenses entered 
by television's officials must be heard, 
too. Both are a part of restless change 
which is magnified in an enterprise 
such as television whose success de- 
pends on public attention. . . . 

"For the thoughtful viewer, televi- 
sion's ability to meet heavy demands 
of its daily schedules inspires contin- 
ual amazement. In accomplishing this 
seven-day-a-week task extending late 
into the night, its scope must of neces- 
sity be panoramic. It offers something 
for everyone, from the children's 
shows to the fight-night programs 
to afternoons with the philharmonic 
to pageants and athletic spectacles. 

"Considered broadly, television is 
in transition, comparable in part to 
the stages which an earlier medium, 
radio, passed through. Public demand 
will chart its future which, television 
officialdom should hope, will be 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 




WORL 



is so highly regarded by the 
Boston Community! 



NEWS 



The news is covered with 
dignity, speed and accuracy. 

It is covered completely and 
thoroughly with emphasis on 
the Local Coverage which is 
of most interest to 
Bostonians 

A full staff gathers, 
edits and presents the 



NEWS 



We realize that our obliga- 
tion as a Radio Broadcaster 

involves more than just spin- 
ning the records of the day. 




wracked by controversies as storm) 
and interesting as the present one." 

• SPONSOR certainly dors agree, anil is 
happy in i . pi nil these ezeerpta from the 
Topeka Staff Journal's editorial. 



"Must" reading 

The excellent article, "Radio Wallops 
Newspapers in New Grocery Shop- 
ping Study" (sponsor, 12/20), is re- 
quired reading for all WTRL sales- 
men, and it should he on the "must 
read" list of every groceryman and 
supermarket manager in the nation. 
Dick Dotv 
pres., WTRL 
Bradenton, Fla. 

I wasvery impressed by your Decem- 
ber 20 article entitled "Radio Wallops 
Newspapers in New Grocery Shop- 
ping Study." 

I feel certain this article can be 
applied to other retail stores as well 
as to groceries, and would like my 
salesmen to carry copies of your 
article with them. 

I would therefore like to request 
from 6 to a dozen copies. 

Harold 0. Parry 

v.p. and local sales mgr. 

WSAI, Cincinnati 

In the December 20th issue of SPON- 
SOR magazine a terrific article ap- 
peared. Starting on page 26 the 
article was entitled "Radio Wallops 
Newspapers in New Grocery Shop- 
ping Study." We would like to obtain 
50 additional copies of this article 
if possible. 

Elzer Marx. gen. mgr. 

Vermilion Broadcasting Corp. 

Danville, Illinois 

Radio ammunition 

Will you please send, at your earliest 
convenience, reprints of: 
' 1 ) Branden loves radio's Sunday 
evening punch from your November 
29th issue. 

(2) Kroger builds 3-way radio form- 
ula from your November 22nd issue. 
Incidentally, both articles are loaded 
with a tremendous amount of ammu- 
nition for selling not only the ac- 
counts they describe, but also almost 
ANY account on radio as an advertis- 
ing medium. It is most refreshing to 
see these RADIO success stories from 
time to time instead of all the articles 
going into TV stories. 

Ted Hepburn 
acct. supvr. 
WHGB, Harrisburg 




How to get your 
product on the 

BIGGEST SHOPPING LIST 

in Southern California 



Your product or service automati- 
cally goes on 100,000 official shopping 
lists . . . just as soon as your radio 
spots go on KBIGs HOME- 
MAKERS' CLUB, INC. package. 
As a participating sponsor, your 
labels are worth money. Jp over 500 
active women's clubs in Southern 
California. Guaranteed also are 
product demonstrations at a mini- 
mum average of 5 club lunches or 
dinners a week; access to consumer 
panel testing; low-cost sampling 
and couponing; regular product 
bulletins to member clubs; and 
monthly listings in Everywoman's 
Family Circle. 

You can buy this proven merchan- 
dising plan (together with the 
effective selling power of KBIG) for 
package rates as low as $155 
weekly. Ask your KBIG or WEED 
representative ... or write for 
special brochure. 



Tin kc/10,000 waits 




JOHN POOLE 
BROADCASTING CO., INC . 

6540 Sunset Blvd. 
Los Angeles 28, Calif. 
HOllvwood 3-3205 



tESENTATIVES: 
© MM J< 



WELD a CO. 

UN POOIC •■04DCMTI 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



23 



SOLID 



NO. 



Morning 

Afternoon 

Evening 



KOIL 

OMAHA 



t« 



HOOPER 
Oct.- Nov. 1 58 

8 AM - 6 PM 

36.2 

share 



TRENDEX 



PULSE 



Check the 

RATING 

of your choice 
KOIL is Your 

MUST BUY" station 
OMAHA 



8 am -6 PM Sept.' 58 



share 



COVERAGE 

where it counts 

KMYR 

A VITAL FORCE 
in selling 

Todays DENVER 



KOIL leads in 458 out of 



Jt ^\ Q 504 quarter-hours with a 

£^MJ t «J flat 30 rating morning 



SOLID 




NO. 




ALL 
DAY 



l 



KMYR 

DENVER 



HOOPER 

July- Aug- 58 

ALL DAY 



PULSE 

17 County Area July '58 



NO. JL' 



More quarter -hour 
firsts than any 
other Denver 
station. 






IF RESULTS ARE A MUST, SO ARE 

4 i#j -k a 



the Star stations 

DON W. BURDEN — President 



• KOIL — Omaha 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
AVERY-KNODEI 

• KMYR — Denver 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
ADAM YOUNG. INC 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 




Dr. Dichter psychoanalyzes radio 



^ Houston station finds its image and a blueprint 
for future in first all-out motivational research study 

^ Here is a new measurement for radio that goes 
behind the numbers to find out audience demands 



I n the years since radio began its 
comeback march, the criticism has 
often been leveled that it was trying 
too hard for numbers that could never 
Igain be attained while neglecting the 
qualitative measurements and studies 
that might make it more valuable to 
advertisers. 

In the face of this, all over the 
country, stations have begun applying 
the qualitative yardstick to their pro- 



graming and their station personali- 
ties. 

A new and healthy concern has 
crept into station management — How 
do our listening friends reall) sec us? 
What will make us more liked? 

This week, in Houston. Texas, ra- 
dio got up off the psychoanalyst's 
couch with a clear-cut profile of il- 
present audience image and a blue- 
print for the future. 



The patient was Houston station 
KPRC. The analyst was The Institute 
for Motivational Research, the world- 
wide organization headed by the man 
who has come to be known as "Mr. 
Motivations'' - Dr. Ernest Dichter. 
For the first time, the Institute, which 
has conducted probes of countless 
products from prunes to passenger 
cars, look on a full-dress stud) of an 
individual station and its radio mar- 
ket. 

Jack Harris, vice president and 
general manager of KPRC, ordered 
the study. "We wanted lo see what 
radio could be and should he. Now 
that the Ml{ report is in. we hope that 
other markets will have the same kind 
of jobs done for them." 

Behind this hope is the idea that il 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



25 



ANSWERS TO PICTURE TEST 

(Sample picture quiz at right) 

Dialogue for each picture Radio Station % 



"I'll call my boy friend now." 


KPRC 


19 


"While the commercial 


Indie A 


16 


is on, I'll get some beer." 


Indie B 


23 


"Now's the time to do 


Net X 


14 


the dishes!" 


Other 


30 


"If only they didn't have 


KPRC 


16 


commercials." 


Indie A 


17 


"How true!" 


Indie B 


36** 




Net X 


1 1 




Other 


14 


"You know, their commercials 


KPRC 


34** 


are often helpful." 


Indie A 


17 


"And that's a fact." 


Indie B 


20 




Net X 


17 




Other 


16 


"Another commercial! Try and 


KPRC 


12 


get something interesting." 


Indie A 


30** 




Indie B 


27** 




Net X . 


6 




Other 


23 




".Multiple answers — will not add to 100^ 
** Significant trend 

■Mill 



Which station is most likely 
to be playing this commercial? 



radio in a number of major markets 
takes to the couch it may reveal some 
things about itself that will make it a 
still more valuable tool to the nation- 
al advertiser. 

Much of what KPRC learned about 
itself and the Houston area audience 
is, of course, classified information — 
especially the specific recommenda- 
tions from the Institute on how the 
station may reshape its personality. 
But within the more than 80-page 
confidential report prepared by Dr. 
Tibor Koeves, vice president of the 
Institute for Motivational Research, 
are many significant findings that 
apply to all radio. 

Among the more significant is the 
revelation that the public seems to be 
dreaming of a new type of radio sta- 
tion. "Unconsciously people want a 
combination of the virtues of the net- 
work and of the local stations," says 
the report. "They wish to be guided 
by the authority, responsibility and 
the vast resources of the network sta- 
tions, but they also wish to be enter- 
tained, stimulated and exhilarated by 
the more informal, perhaps less pro- 

26 



fessional. but warmer, more intimate 
approaches and programing of the 
smaller local stations." 

The implication has often been 
made that in multi-station markets, 
radio is becoming stratified — that one 
outlet becomes the pop music strata, 
another the news and sports station, 
and so on. sponsor asked Dr. Koeves 
whether his Houston study supported 
this theory and whether this was the 
future for radio. 

"Neither radio's present nor future 
indicates stratification," he said. "Our 
depth studies tend to show that the 
capabilities of radio, as opposed to 
other media, have become crystal- 
lized. In general, radio cannot com- 
pete very successfully on the enter- 
tainment level. But it does show a 
greater and greater appeal on the 
service level. It is effective in pro- 
viding an understanding of world 
events and community events. It is 
effective as a problem-solver, especial- 
ly for housewives and teen-agers. It 
is extremely effective in providing 
companionship in fact, excelled at it. 

"It is this combination of emotion- 



al refreshment and service which will 
be characteristic of the successful 
radio operation." 

Since no human being acts unless 
motivated by a drive or need, the five- 
month study for KPRC turned up 
these 10 basic constellations of needs 
which influence or determine the lis- 
tener's reaction to particular radio 
programs and stations: 

(1) Need for orientation or focus- 
ing in a dynamically changing world. 

(2) Need to escape from every-day 
worries and cares. 

(3) Need for emotional identifica- 
tion with others; to escape loneliness. 

(4) Need for individualism. 

(5) Need to express aggression. 

(6) Need to feel moral. 

( 7) Need for a heightened sense of 
life. 

(8) Need for relaxation and day- 
dreaming. 

(9) Need for coping with personal 
problems. 

(10) Need for coping with intel- 
lectual and spiritual problems. 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



How these basic psychological 
needs influence radio listening is eas- 
ily demonstrated. The need for emo- 
tional identification with others (3 1 
is another way of saying "a need to 
get over that lonely, isolated feeling." 
To satisfy this need is why people 
turn to radio as a companion. On the 
other hand, the need to express ag- 
gression (5) is more often filled by 
tuning in a tv Western than by listen- 
ing to radio. 

These findings are a key to under- 
standing comparative effectiveness of 
competitive radio stations inasmuch 
as listeners in every interview and 
test tended to praise or criticize a 
program on whether it filled or failed 
to fill one or more of these basic 
needs. 

For example, here is a quote from 
one Houston listener who uncon- 
sciously said that radio filled her ba- 
sic need for orientation and focusing: 
"As a housewife my horizons could, 
and sometimes do, become limited. 
Radio helps to keep me informed 
about material that my husband gets 
in his business contacts. A number of 
stations give me this kind of pro- 
gram but I guess KPRC most of all." 

That Houstonians are not the least 
bit fuzzy about the image presented 



b\ KPRC was constantly evident 
throughout the study. Emerging from 
the depth interviews and progressive 
tests ( often lasting two hours or even 
longer) came such interesting and 
psychologically significant data as 
the spontaneous association of KPRC 
with such personalities as Gen. Doug- 
las McArthur, Margaret Truman or 
Oveta Culp Hobby. In a "product 
association" test, the station was most 
often associated with very expensive 
homes, mink coats, Ford Thunder- 
birds; much less associated with pre- 
fab homes, mouton coats or baldness 
remedies. 

From the analysis, KPRC comes 
through in its market as rich, well- 
educated, expert and reliable. It is 
relied on for news and its commer- 
cials are credible. (See charts.) But 
in this motivational study the station 
was not looking for bouquets; it 
wanted to know both strengths and 
weaknesses. On the negative side, it 
learned that it was somewhat lacking 
in both warmth and excitement. 
"KPRC," said one listener, "reminds 
me of an old teacher with no sense 
of humor." Now that the station 
knows both its advantages and its 
shortcomings, it has the blueprint for 
balancing its trustworthiness (in 



credibility, its commercials lead the 
nearest competing station by nearly 
3095 in believability) with tin- 
warmth which has become an integral 
part of local radio. 

Now that a station has submitted 
to this searching analysis, man\ will 
find it interesting to watch how it 
proceeds to develop some strong new 
personality traits without destroying 
the strong, respectable image it en- 
joys currently. How KPRC uses its 
motivational research study may well 
be a key to strengthening local radio 
as a national medium. 

Because this Dr. Dichter stud\ "I 
the Houston audience has not dimin- 
ished the value of radio at all; it has 
simply exposed the fact that in many 
cases radio has abdicated positions of 
strength where no abdication was 
called for. This was probably best 
summed up in the remark of a Hous- 
ton housewife and mother who said, 
"It is rather sad that radio programs 
are no longer the interesting and en- 
tertaining kind that they were. Their 
potentialities are so great. Th*\ 
could stimulate the imagination con- 
structively as the\ have in the past. 
Now they are floundering and letting 
the tv stations kill all initiative and 
I Please turn to page 57) 



imiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii iiiiiiuiiiiini milium mi mi iinimiiiiimimiiii m iiiih 



COMMENTS ON STATIONS 



REACTIONS ELICITED 
BY DEPTH INTERVIEWS 



I have the station on most 
of the day, but only listen 
with half an ear. 

I turn that station on when 
I want to find out what's 
new, what's happening. 



I just turn it on for music. 



They have programs that 
make you thinlc. 

A lot of the stuff on the 
station is just over my 
head. 



They're mostly teen-agers 
who listen to that station. 



You can generally believe 
them and trust what you've 
heard. 



KPRC 


Indie A 

%" 


Indie B 
96* 


Indie C 


Net X 
%* 


17 


40 


34 


31 


16 


51 


18 


20 


12 


27 


16 


43 


33 


30 


20 


66 


4 


9 


13 


33 


45 


14 


6 


14 


35 


3 


80 


36 


20 


4 


78 


8 


20 


13 


39 



■Multiple answers — will not add to inO'r 



^miiiimiiiimimimiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiniiiiiimiiiiiimiiiimmimiiim 

SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 




27 



Wall Street goes wild over radio 



^ Newspaper strike provides an eye-opening advertis- 
ing experience for ultra conservative investment firms 

^ Emergency schedules of spot radio announcements 
keep personnel working late at night to answer phones 



I he ordered ways of Wall Street 
were sharply jolted last month when 
investment firms used spot radio to 
reach customers shut off from daily 
stock reports by the New York news- 
paper strike. Jokes about "banker's 
hours" got a new twist as lights 
burned late in offices where sales per- 
sonnel battled to keep up with the 
calls that swamped switchboards as 
soon as the new announcements went 



on the air. Tension mounted nightly. 
Personal encounter with the power 
and impact of the media caused quick 
shifts in many long-held opinions 
about its use by the financial world. 
Post-strike promotions are likely to 
be changed as a result. And some 
surprises may be in store for the ex- 
perts because these allegedly slow- 
moving financial advertisers proved 
to be remarkably quick on their feet 



Way past closing time — but few people had a chance to go home when Eastman Dillon 
went on the air as an emergency measure during New York newspaper strike last week 




in the f9-day news emergency. 

Here is the experience of one house 
who ventured on the air for the first 
time during the strike. The firm: 
Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & 
Co., investment bankers and members 
of the New York Stock Exchange. 

John Ellis, partner in charge of the 
New York sales department, made the 
decision to use radio at ff a.m. 
on 18 December. His call to his ad- 
vertising agency, Doremus & Co., 
stressed the need for quick action. 

Commercials were written and ap- 
proved by 2 p.m. the same day, cleared 
by the New York Stock Exchange 
and in the hands of the stations by 
3 p.m. The announcements were sim- 
ple and dignified. Just a statement 
that, as a public service, the firm 
would keep qualified representatives 
at their desks that night to answer 
questions about the day's stock mar- 
ket activities. An invitation was 
given to phone for up-to-the-minute 
information about any specific stock 
or bond. 

The first day's schedule (added to 
as the promotion continued) : a one- 
minute spot on WCBS, a five-minute 
news program on WABC, and five 
20-minute spots on WPAT, Patterson, 
N. J. The first announcement was 
heard at 5 p.m. and immediately 
thereafter the board "lit up like the 
Christmas trees in the office," accord- 
ing to the startled, Mr. Ellis. 

As the calls continued to pour in, 
more volunteers were hurriedly asked 
to stem the tide. About 40 people 
stayed the first night. Over 700 
calls were received and about 450 
callers asked to be called back the 
next day. The next morning, the 
night's news spread through the of- 
fice — and there was no difficulty in 
getting an even larger staff for eve- 
ning — everybody wanted to stay and 
mine the gold in "them there hills." 

The following Monday, the addi- 
tion of two one-minute spots during 
early evening news programs on 
WOR, New York produced a new ava- 
lanche of calls. The board could not 
be closed until hours after the an- 
nounced closing time. 

Commenting on his experience, Mr. 
Ellis says that this spot radio pro- 






SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



gram produced "the fastest results we 
have ever had from advertising." On 
a typical evening during the strike, 
after hours activity at Eastman Dil- 
lon started soon after 5 p.m. with 
the arrival of messengers with copies 
of every available out-of-town news- 
paper with financial pages. Others 
soon followed bringing the last fig- 
ures from the nearby Stock Ex- 
changes. By 6, when calls usually 
reached their first peak, everyone 
was at their posts, and the big office 
with its three lighted Christmas trees 
was a bedlam. 

Although the firm went into ra- 
dio purely as a public service during 
an emergency, the number and qual- 
ity of the leads that were turned up 
has given Ellis a strong desire for its 
continued use after the strike. 

Other financial houses who already 
had regular radio programs used 
varying tactics during the news emer- 
gency. Francis I. du Pont & Co., with 
a regular five-minute market report at 
6:15 p.m. on WQXR. New York, cut 
their commercial to allow more time 
for reading market reports, but re- 
ported no use of additional time. 
Paine Webber Jackson & Curtis, 
whose morning program on the same 
station is a fixture in financial circles, 
made no changes except to use a 
small advertisement in the Wall Street 
Journal to plug the program. 

On the other hand, Shearson Ham- 
mill & Co. supplemented their regular 
Today In Wall Street on WRCA, 
by cutting commercial time and took 
additional time at the end of another 
program to invite listeners to call any 
of their five offices for information. 
They did not offer night service. Calls 
during the day rose to about three 
times above normal. 

Harris, Upham & Co. also took an 
additional five minutes, and their 
6:55 p.m. offer of financial news by 
phone kept about 20 men busy on the 
truck lines — often until 10 p.m. 

Bache & Co.'s Henry Gellerman 
thought the newspaper strike was 
coming and made early arrangements 
for two five-minute spots at 12:10 
and 4:10 in the afternoon to supple- 
ment their regular 7:15 p.m. program 
on WOR. They arranged to have a 
staff on hand evenings to handle re- 
sponses to their offer of information 
on closings, etc. But, though fore- 
( Please turn to page 65 I 



FLAVORS MAKE TEST NEWS 



WESTERN UNION 



# 



i« UWC277 PD-FAX MILWAUKEE J13 *4 120^PJC« ..' » 2 

•JOHN MCULLIH* SPO.ISOR- 
*0 EAST 49 ST HYK* 
;RETEL» PARTIDAY 8ALE3 OCTOBER 16 TO DECEMBER 16 %5 
CHOCOLATE 907 FBDGE* ©76 BUTTERSCOTCH* 7*2 UAR3HUALL0VJ= 
OTTO L KUEH'l CO a W B0Y7ER = 



The test in a nutshell 

Product: Parti-Day Toppings 
Market: 80 mile area around Green 
Bay, Wisconsin 

Media: Day lv spots only 

Schedule: 10 spots weekly 
Length : 26 weeks — from Oct. 15 
Commercials: Live, one minute 
Budget: $9,980 complete 



I his week, Parti-Day Corp. turned 
to a flavor-by-flavor analysis of its 
sales results in the Green Bay, Wis- 
consin test of day tv. 

The telegram above, from Marvin 
W. Bower, merchandise manager for 
Otto L. Kuehn Co.. Milwaukee food 
broker for Parti-Day. contains a few 
surprises for executives of Parti-Day 
and the D'Arcy agency. 

As of 15 October, when Parti-Day's 
schedule of 10 daytime tv minute 
spots per week started over WBAY- 
TV. Green Bay. they had predicted 



that the two chocolate flavors — fudge 
and straight chocolate — would run 
well ahead of the lesser known flavors, 
butterscotch and marshmallow. 

Bower's wire shows that of the 
3,490 cases of Parti-Day shipped to 
wholesalers in the Green Bay area 
during the first two months of the 
test, chocolate (965) and fudge i ( )17 i 
accounted for nearh 5 IS of sales. 
Noteworthy was the relatively strong 
showing of butterscotch (8761 which 
nearly equalled the figure for fudge. 

Chocolate flavors traditionally pre- 
dominate in the topping field. 

Parti-Dav and D'Arcy executives, 
however, are cautious about accept- 
ing a one-market flavor breakdown as 
indicative of the nation-wide picture. 
Thev say that so far their experience 
with Parti-Day shows clearK that 
"every market is different. 

In New York, for instance, butter- 
scotch is running even stronger than 
in the Green Bay market, while in 
New England it is lagging far behind 
Parti-Dav Fud»e and Chocolate. ^ 




llllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll:. 



SALES BOX SCORE 

16-31 Oct 580 cases 

1-15 Nov 1,450 cases 

15-30 Nov 370 cases 

1-15 Dec 1,090 cases 



Shipments to wholesalers in Green 
Bay, Wis. area since start <>t i\ test 



in 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



29 



WHO 

In Vui 
J7//H 



M 



N 




Woodrow Voss, Site station manager and KM\ R Korrespondent phones traffic report 

2,000 LOCAL REPORTERS 

^ Denver radio station creates giant news staff using 
private citizens, gets fast tips on all community doings 



m resh evidence of the imaginative 
tactics which have made radio Amer- 
ica's No. 1 source of local news, 
comes in this week from music-news 
station KMYR, Denver. 

The Rocky Mountain station has 
scored a scoop over any previous 
news coverage ever offered by any 
newspaper in the area, by naming 
2.000 private Denver citizens as spe- 
cial KMYR ^Correspondents, and of- 
fering weekly $25 prizes for the best 
news tips sent in. 

The KMYR Korrespondent's corps 
is only one, but perhaps the most spec- 
tacular, of the moves which Don Bur- 
den, president of the Star Stations 
(KMYR, Denver and KOIL, Omaha I 
has made in an effort to build the 
"fastest, most accurate news coverage 
possible in this area." 

Six months ago, after reorganizing 
his news staff, and adding such mod- 
ern equipment as three mobile cruis- 
ers ( see sponsor's comprehensive 
story in the 4 October issue on "How 
radio stations are pepping up news 
coverage") Burden began an inten- 
sive drive for more local reporters. 

Using a barrage of announcements, 
the station solicited all listeners to 
help report the news from the spot. 

30 



Special "KMYR Korrespondents" 
cards were offered as well as weekly 
prizes. To date, more than 2,000 
Korrespondents have signed up, and 
more are coming in at the rate of 
10 new ones each day. The station's 
stepped-up news service has attracted 
many new sponsors and one, Site Oil, 
has made the idea part of its sales 
program naming all its station mana- 
gers KMYR Korrespondents. 

Site Oil is in a particularly ad- 
vantageous position to take full ad- 
vantage of the promotion, since it has 
many stations in the area. Each sta- 
tion manager is requested to make 
special reports on any newsworthy 
happenings in his locality, in addi- 
tion to regular daily reports on traffic 
conditions. These phoned in reports 
are made an integral part of the 10 
daily newscasts sponsored by the 
company. 

KMYR reports that all sorts of 
news tips — accidents, fires, holdups, 
murders, suicides — are being phoned 
in with "amazing immediacy." Re- 
cently, one frustrated KMYR Korre- 
spondent who was the fifth to report 
on the same robbery had this com- 
ment: "You guys aren't reporting the 
news — you're making it." ^ 



Drug chain 

W Pittsburgh chain matches 
sales increases of discount 
firms in 7-day campaign 
with premium stamp ally 



1 he latest straw that's been heaped 
on the heavy back of drug stores — 
particularly the large chains — is the 
discount house. One drug chain that 
has not been willing to take the price 
competition lying down is the Sun 
Drug Co. in Western Pennsylvania. 

A couple of weeks ago it decided to 
fight fire with fire by lining up a 
bunch of traffic-luring items at attrac- 
tive discount prices, then blasting 
them at the communities in and 
around Pittsburgh. Sound as such 
strategy appears on paper, the tactics 
are something else again. Sun Drug 
felt it needed: 

• The right medium for impact. 

• An ally. 

• A saturation schedule broad 
enough to cover a flock of items. 

• A supply setup that wouldn't 
catch stores short of advertised goods. 

Finding the ally was fairly simple. 
The 10-year-old Top Value Stamp Co. 
has been pushing its way into ac- 
ceptance during the biggest growth 
years of the discount houses. 

Both Sun Drug and Top Value are 
users of radio. They were agreed that 
radio would give them the right 
amount of excitement with flexibility 
that would permit equal exposure for 
all items. At the same time, the 
schedule could be geared to the prob- 
lems of supply. 

KQV sales manager Bob Thomp- 
son huddled with Sun Drug's ad man- 
ager Harold Perry, buyer and assist- 
ant ad manager J. W. Hume along 
with Top Value's assistant ad mana- 
ger Wally Davids and assistant zone 
manager John Holm. The test cam- 
paign was set to run the week before 
Christmas — a time when many phar- 
maceutical houses curtail ad dollars. 

A saturation schedule was set, call- 
ing for 72 spots to run from 17 
through 23 December, 6:30 a.m. to 
6:30 p.m., evenly distributed through- 
out the day. 

This marked Sun's first experience 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



wars on discount houses with radio 



with an item promotion on radio. 
Top Value, in a sense, would he com- 
peting with itself. Its own "redeem 
your stamps now" schedule was al- 
ready running on KQV. A half hour 
protection was required between these 
and the joint promotional spots. 

Item selection took several things 
into account. First, according to 
Suns assistant ad manager Hume, 
there had to be one high ticket item 
for three reasons: ( 1 I to get volume 
from the promotion. (2) to identify 
Sun with the type of merchandise 
that you might think first of looking 
for in a discount house. ( 3 1 high 
ticket items, along with sundries, go 
best in self-service operations. 

Sun Drug, which pioneered self- 
service durgstores in and around 
Pittsburgh, now has 20 in its 46-store 



chain. Items therefore had to be 
selected with both self-service and 
conventional setups in mind. 

An electric blanket satisfied the 
high-ticket requirement. Two other 
items were also picked with an eye to 
self-service: a portable radio and milk 
chocolates. A snow brush kit and 
mens and women's billfolds are con- 
sidered attended-service items be- 
cause of demonstration involved with 
the first, handling and comparisons 
with the latter. 

With the items selected, KQV s 
continuity editor Herb Heiman start- 
ed writing the spots which had to be 
recorded and on the air in two da\s. 
Recording the spots provided sched- 
uling flexibility and made two-man 
spots with production gimmicks pos- 
sible. 



I hi I- - how (he ilem> v\ei <■ appni 

tioned in the four spots: 

• Electric blank"!. This high-th k> | 
it. in got ii- own 60-second commer- 
cial, a two-man spot, humorous. \ 
plaj on "automatic and easy-to-get" 
tied blanket to premium -tiitnj >~. 

• Snow brush kit and pocket radio, 
each requiring some explanation, 
shared a 60-second. one-man spet, 
straight sell. 

• Milk chocolates and billfolds 
were also combined in a two-man 
spot, humorous, centering on an argu- 
ment over who got the best value, 
both agreeing that stamps in the bar- 
gain give it to both, ending in board 
fade as argument resumes over who 
got the best brand-name item with his 
premium stamps. 

i Please turn to pa;^ \ i7 i 



Fast sell-outs created re-supply problem: Sun Drug asst. ad mgr. J. W. Hume (I), Top \ alue Stamps' asst. zone mgr. John Holm pitch in 



/ 






air 1 










I(|P 




•-*\A'4 



,v#M; 



Food, oil, tobacco provide 50.5% 



^ RAB estimates show that three major industries 
account for more than half of all radio spot spending 

^ Top advertisers use medium in many ways: for 
reminder copy, straight sell, in flights, 52-week drives 



1 here is often a tendency to gen- 
eralize about spot radios prime pur- 
pose. 

Some say it is primarily a way to 
reach a lot of people cheaply; others 
say it is primarily a reminder me- 
dium; still others point to its auto 
audience as its most effective target; 
and there is a group who say that it is 



best for short advertising bursts. 

True, it is all these things but it is 
a lot more, too. A look at how spot 
radio's top clients use the medium 
makes clear that most generalities are 
meaningless. 

• For example: the oil companies, 
who are heavily represented among 
the top accounts, obviously go after 



pillllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllW 

THIRD QUARTER 1958 SPOT RADIO 
ADVERTISERS— BY CATEGORY 

■ RANK CATEGORY % OF TOTAL 

1 Food and grocery 18.9 

2 Gasoline, lubricants 18.3 

3 Tobacco products 13.3 

4 Ale, beer, wine 9.0 

5 Cleansers 6.8 

6 Automotive 6.0 

6 Drugs 6.0 

8 Toilet requisites 4.6 

9 Finance 3.4 

10 Agriculture 3.0 

11 Transportation, travel 2.0 

12 Miscellaneous 1.9 

13 Confections, soft drinks 1.6 

14 Consumer Services 1.0 

15 Household, General .7 

15 Pet products - .7 

17 Building material .6 

17 Clothing, apparel, accessories .6 

17 Publications .6 

17 Amusements .6 

21 Watches, jewelry, silverware .4 

The RAB estimates above are based on the amount of time purchased by 
clients in these categories. Religious and political sponsorship are 
not included. Note that top three categories account for 50% of buys 

Iilll!!iillllll!llll!l!lllllllllllllli!llllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



auto radio audiences as a means of 
pinpointing their prime prospects — 
who are men drivers. Yet the heavy 
use of spot radio by food companies 
clearly indicates they are banking on 
in-home listening by women as a 
means of putting their selling mes- 
sages across. 

• For example: the big three auto 
companies, all of whom are in the 
top 10 among spot radio users, de- 
pend heavily on radio just to remind 
consumers that their new models are 
on view. On the other hand, the 
cigarette firms ( four of the big six 
are among the top 25 spot radio 
users, three are in the top 10) com- 
monly give their complete sales run- 
down. And, as a matter of fact, the 
auto companies sometimes present de- 
tailed reason-why copy on radio. 

• For example: the names of cli- 
ents who use flights in spot radio are 
legion I see "Can a 4-week radio 
flight do the job?" sponsor, 20 De- 
cember 1958), yet Continental Bak- 
ing, which, RAB estimates, spends 
$1.6 million in spot radio, lays out 
52-week campaigns in its major 
markets. 

• For example: Sinclair Oil, a 
heavy spot radio user, employs the 
six-second announcement with little 
more than the brand name in it. 
Northwest Orient Airlines uses spot 
for both image-building and to give 
details on terminal points and fares. 

The list of spot radio's top cli- 
ents (a list 51 names long) was re- 
leased recently by RAB in a precedent- 
shattering move. ( See "Spot radio's 
51 leaders in 1958," sponsor, 27 De- 
cember 1958.) Included were esti- 
mates of the actual spending by these 
clients, though not by brands. The 
estimates were based on activity dur- 
ing nine months of the year as re- 
ported by an increasing sample of the 
medium (40% during the third quar- 
ter of 1958). While a substantial 
number of stations are not included 
in the RAB sample, and while some 
of the estimates are rough, RAB did 
considerable cross-checking to assure 
itself the dollar figures were close to 
the truth. 

An analysis of the top spenders dis- 
closes that the oil industry is repre- 



32 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



sented by the largest number of firms 
—nine in all. This group includes 
National Carbon for Prestone anti- 
freeze and the Alemite division of 
Stewart - Warner Corp. The allied 
auto industry, as mentioned previ- 
ously, was also well represented, with 
the top two spenders being General 
Motors and Ford. The largest single 
expenditures by GM went for Chev- 
rolet, while the Ford money went pri- 
marily for Ford cars. Ford trucks and 
the new Galaxie. 

Food ranked next in importance to 
oil in the number of clients in the 
top 51. The importance of food to 
spot radio is not exactly a surprise 
considering the basic nature of the 
product, the large number of firms 
making and selling food and the fact 
that the food industry is a major 
category in all media. Taking into 
account all spot radio spending, food 
is the number one category (see chart 
on opposite page). 

A total of seven beer firms are rep- 
resented among the leaders, but as 
with food, none are in the top 10. 
Anheuser-Busch and Carling are well 
in the lead among the brewers. None 
of the others are in the top 25 spot 
radio users. 

The top group also includes a half 
dozen drug firms. The four tobacco 
firms represented in the leading spot 
radio companies represent nearly 
80% of domestic sales. Also includ- 
ed were three finance companies, 
three airlines and such names as 
Lever Bros., Colgate, Revlon and 
American Home Products. Of the 
last four names, only Lever (which 
ranked 10) was among the top 25 
spenders. Rounding out the list are 
Robert Hall, Metropolitan Life and 
Associated Sepian Products, which 
markets to Negroes. 

The breakdown of total spot radio 
spending by categories and in terms 
of percentages for the third quarter 
of 1958 is the second such quarterly 
breakdown put out by RAB. While 
it is not strictly comparable to the 
figures for the second quarter, a 
rough comparison shows that the 
ranking by industries hasn't changed 
much. As RAB enlarges its sample 
and improves its estimates, it will dis- 
continue the percentage figure and 
bring out dollar figures only. ^ 



BIB 



CHIMES IN 



^ Another Luce publication takes up the familiar 
print-oriented attack on "sleazy, self-imitative" tv 



Readers of Life Magazine's 22 De- 
cember "double issue." dealing with 
U. S. Entertainment were treated to 
another magazine blast against the tv 
industry. 

Though somewhat more restrained 
than Fortune's "Light that Failed" 
article reported in SPONSOR on 29 No- 
vember, Life's editorial still hewed 
closely to the print-inspired "anti-tv 
party line" which hard-pressed pub- 
lishers are using in an effort to bol- 



"confusion of stars and selling, of 
public art and public selling." and 
seems to suggest that tv performers 
should not be allowed to endorse 
advertised products. 

Other suggestions: that the net- 
works take all program control away 
from advertisers and a "parallel sys- 
tem of pay-as-you-listen tv with a 
view to restoring the direct relation 
between entertainer and audience." 

Life's suggestions, according to tv 



How 




Another season of second-rate pro- 
graming has started . TV on a setf- 
destruetive cycle: program mediocrity 
reduces audience, reduced audience 
weakens the medium's economics, 
weakened economics seems to bring 


FORTUNE 




on more mediocrity. m 


tipped off 




— „,„..,,„,.-„„ .*,. 


the new anti-tv 


"party line" 


Wm»*t Melt, at <ii» Wakte 1 Astoria in 
New York, L$jpam- H. Roger. II. 


Ptceinber 
litW 'IV 
frtic^i hi* 


ssue of i'otiunt Mftgwrim*, To track dunn thesr rum i 
-The Ught Ttntf Failed" discover tfw extort of FarflMt'* atttael 

s — ~^ontiie;^" w*$utth <w ii- - ~ - ■■■■_ */> >p»>sm* nasaged 



Here's how SPONSOR reported the "Tv — the Light That Failed" article in Dec. Fortune 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



ster their sagging advertising reve- 
nues. 

Said Life: "So many critics have 
assailed the sleazy and self-imitative 
bulk of tv output that we will not dis- 
cuss it here." But Life did not hesi- 
tate to take up the now-familiar bat- 
tle cry against tv's "economic struc- 
ture." 

As sponsor has warned, attacks on 
tv economics are part of the over-all 
print strategy to discredit the air me- 
dia. And Life rang a few changes 
on the well-known but not-too-well- 
documented allegations. 

According to Life, "t\ is becoming 
a subsidiary, instead of a vehicle of 
advertising. Both are honorable pro- 
fessions but more so when kept sep- 
arate." Life goes on to weep some 
mammoth crocodile tears over the 



executives with whom sponsor has 
talked, are almost naively self-serv- 
ing. First, because the actual amount 
of "program control" exercised b\ 
advertisers in 1959 is less than at anj 
time in tv history. The agencies have 
withdrawn almost entirel) from t\ 
production. And few advertisers wield 
much direct power on program con- 
tent, except through their undoubted 
right to buy, or not buy, particular 
programs. 

As to Life's notion of "pay-as-you< 
listen [\ ." here's a significant com- 
ment from a highly placed industry 
executive. '"If pa\ t\ is ever to suc- 
ceed, it will have to accept advertise 
ing. Thais the onlj waj it can be 
financed. 

But, meanwhile, the magazine boys 
dream on. \n<l on. \nd on. ^ 

33 







working 




partners 



productive representation . . . 

In no field of sales is maturity, experience and a 
background of performance more essential than in radio 

and TV station representation. And it was the need <i^V >>■ 
for a representative organization made up of men who 
possess these special qualifications that led to the 
formation of H-R by a group of mature and experienced 

working partners. Our steady growth over the years 
confirms our belief that many discriminating stations 
prefer this distinctive type of representative 
service when it is made available to them. 




FRANK HEADIEY, President 
DWIGHT REED, Vice-President 
FRANK PEUEGRIN, Vice-President 




RADIO 




' . . . We always send a man to do a man's job" 



TELEVISION 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

HOLLYWOOD 



SAN FRANCISCO 

DALLAS 

DETROIT 



ATLANTA 
HOUSTON 
NEW ORLEANS 



34 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 




AN 
ANNUAL 

SPONSOR 

SECTION 



^J n the following pages sponsor presents one of 
its most popular annual features, the summary of 
Tv Results" which have appeared in our magazine 
during the past 12 months. 

These "tv results" are capsule case histories in a 
wide variety of product and service categories, rang- 
ing from appliances to toys. 

Most, as you will see, detail the highly successful 
use of the tv medium by local advertisers. Thumb- 
ing through them you are almost certain to find at 
least a few which are directly related to some phase 
of your own business. 



We realize, of course, that in such limited space 
we cannot hope to provide all the factual material 
which sponsor ordinarily give< in its full-length case 
history stories. 

What you will find here, however, is a wealth oJ 
idea-producing leads and suggestions. If you wish 
further information, we suggesl you write directl) 
to the advertisers and stations involved. 

We do not pretend that these are the top t\ cam- 
paigns of the year, though they are certainly good 
ones. We do believe that this tv results section will 
give you a helpful insight into the wide variety of 
advertising uses for which the medium i> fitted. 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



35 



TV RESULTS continued 



APPLIANCES 



SPONSOR: Tinsley Tire Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Prior to Tinsley Tire Company's tv 
campaign its warehouse was packed with used appliances, 
such as combination refrigerator-freezers, deluxe ranges, 
washing machines and tv sets. Following a print campaign 
in which the results were limited, Tinsley turned to tv and 
bought five one-minute announcements in Class B and C 
time on WBIR-TV, Knoxville, Tenn. By the end of the first 
week, Tinsley had sold its entire stock of refrigerators and 
the remaining items were moving rapidly. One week after 
the campaign began the company purchased five additional 
1-minute announcements in the same time classifications. 
"It looks as though the warehouse will be just about empty 
by the time the last spots are run," said Stan Tinsley, owner. 
As a direct result of the campaign, Tinsley bought a schedule 
of five weekly announcements to run through the summer. 
These announcements will probably be extended to the 
Christmas season, to give the schedule maximum momentum. 



WBIR-TV, Knoxville 



PURCHASE: Announcements 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: Sutton Oldsmobile AGENCY: Griswold Advt. 

Capsule case history: Sutton Oldsmobile of Sacramento 
has been sponsoring half of Western Theatre, 7:00 to 7:30 
p.m., Thursdays, on KBET-TV, Sacramento for the past few 
months. Sutton displays an Oldsmobile model on-camera 
during each of their announcements. They have met with 
conspicuous success since they started their campaign. Not 
a week has gone by that Sutton's has not had direct results 
from their tv program. Early in 1958, as evidence of the 
immediate response to this advertising, the model displayed 
on the program was sold before Sutton's could remove it 
from the studio. The following two days brought more than 
100 people to Sutton's showrooms from all over the valley. 
In addition there were several long distance phone calls from 
cities over 100 miles away such as Reno, Turlock and Tracy. 
"We think the results of our advertising have been excel- 
lent. Tv certainly proved to be a worthwhile investment for 
us," said L. M. Griswold, KBET-TV's agency president. 

KBET-TV, Sacramento 



PURCHASE: Half-sponsorship of 
Western Theatre 



AUTOMOBILES 



36 



SPONSOR: Rosen-Novak AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Rosen-Novak, Omaha car dealer, 
has been a charter advertiser on KETV, also of Omaha, 
since the station signed on the air over a year ago. Rosen 
has had such outstanding results that he has twice renewed 
for 13-week periods. The company has been co-sponsor of 
KETV's highly successful Movie Masterpiece (first-run fea- 
ture films), Thursday beginning at 9:35 p.m. The com- 
pany uses one of the massive KETV studios to produce its 
live commercials, with Rosen or one of his sales force, his 
wife and a KETV announcer delivering the announcement. 
These commercials have been so successful, Rosen has de- 
veloped a sizable personal following. A different car is dis- 
played for each message and the results are phenomenal. 
"It is rare for a car to remain in our showrooms for more 
than 24 hours after its appearance on KETV," states Ed 
Rosen, part owner. "Our television advertising is doing 
exceptionally well and volume is continuing at a high level." 



KETV, Omaha 



Program 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: McLean Pontiac Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: McLean Pontiac Corp., of Norfolk, 
Va., had never used tv before the company purchased a spot 
schedule of four one-minute announcements in WAVY-TV's 
(Norfolk) , Early Late Show. McLean received results within 
one week after the campaign started. "Of the four automo- 
biles which were displayed during the announcements, two 
were sold within 48 hours after the announcements were 
made," said Richard Davis of McLean. "In addition to the 
direct sales, the telephone calls made to the showroom by 
people who had viewed the commercial have been most grati- 
fying." McLean's commercials include live showings of new 
automobiles in a specially lighted area under the facade oi 
WAVY-TV's studio. "Big Jim" Waters, McLean sales man 
ager, handles the announcements, including the introductior 
of other McLean sales people. After two months of advertis 
ing on WAVY-TV, Davis reported that results of the cam) 
paign showed a startling 65% increase in new car sales 






WAVY-TV, Norfolk 



PURCHASE: Announcement! 
SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



TV RESULTS continued 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: Murray Vout 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: Murray Vout, a local auto dealer in 
Salinas, California had not been using television for quite 
some time. In 1957 the firm, in business for over 30 years, 
switched its grant to English Fords and Studebakers and its 
budget to television. The car dealer purchased full sponsor- 
ship of two sports programs on KSBW-TV, Salinas-Monterey, 
Calif., immediately following Wednesday Night Fights on 
ABC TV and Friday night fights on NBC TV. In the follow- 
ing 12 months Vout registered a 27 r < gain in business, 
despite a supposed general recession. With 95ft of his adver- 
tising budget devoted to tv, Vout decided he could not afford 
both sports programs and cut his tv budget to one sports pro- 
gram, spreading his budget among other media. One month 
later Vout returned to KSBW-TV. unhappy with new results. 
With renewed sponsorship of both programs, he said: "I 
didn't fully appreciate the impact of tv until I used other 
media again. Then I realized it was the key to my success." 



KSBW-TV, Salinas-Monterey 



Progr 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: Patten Edsel Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Patten Edsel Co. never advertised 
on tv until July, 1958, when William Patten, pres., purchased 
20 nighttime spots on WRGP-TV, Chattanooga, Tenn. The 
announcements were devoted half to his repair service and 
half to sell new cars. The auto company employed two dif- 
ferent spots on repairs; a film emphasized "all make" serv- 
ice, and the other a live announcer with rear screen projec- 
tion of the shop. The auto sales spots stressed the quality of 
the cars by displaying three models with a live announcer. 
Immediate results were obtained. Following the announce- 
ments numerous phone inquiries were received regarding 
service, plus jobs from customers who had actually left their 
tv sets to come in for repairs. On Friday and Saturday of the 
same week, Patten Edsel's service department was swamped 
with customers. Traffic was so heavy that the shop had two 
crews working and still could not handle all the business. 



WRGP-TV, Chattanooga 



Announcements 



AUTO & CLOTHING 

SPONSORS: Van-Trow Cadillac and Olds Co. AGENO : Direcl 

and Silverstein's Fashions 

Capsule case history: Van-Trow Cadillac and Olds Co.. a 
steady advertiser on kNOE-TV, and Silverstein's Fashions 
sponsored a 30-minute spectacular following the Bing Cmsbv 
special in November on KNOE-TV, Monroe, La., to show- 
case the new 1959 Cadillac and latest women's fashions. 
Replicas of every Cadillac made from the first year to the 
present were displayed along with the women's fashions for 
the corresponding year. The entire show including time, 
talent and extras cost only $250 — $125 each. Van-Trow had 
made special arrangements to display the new 1959 Cadillac 
on the show and to also give immediate delivery to an) 
buyers. As a direct result of the show the dealer sold three 
1959 Cadillacs the following day to people who had never 
owned one before. Silverstein's reported the best Thursdav 
in its entire 30-year history. Even the Dodge dealer who 
watched the show called KNOE-TV for a similar show for 
Dodge. Van-Trow reports consistently high results from t\. 



KNOE-TV, Monroe, La. 



Program 



BANK 



SPONSOR: First National Bank of Elkhart AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Elkhart, Ind. recently concluded 
its centennial, which was celebrated from 13 September 
through 20 September. The First National Bank of Elkhart 
purchased a centennial package of half-hour shows on 
WSJV-TV, South Bend-Elkhart to advertise '"old-fashioned 
bargain days." The plan called for the merchants of Elkhart 
to display their goods on tables in front of the stores and sell 
direct from the stands. First National Bank used one live 
commercial within American Bandstand the day preceding 
the Centennial to advertise 140 souvenir saving banks on 
a first-come, first-serve basis, one per customer. On the 
opening day of the centennial a crowd had gathered waiting 
for the banks doors to open. Just 12 minutes after the 
doors were opened the entire 140 banks were sold. "\\ e 
could have sold 1,000 if they had been available." said 
Jack Donis. asst. v.p. "We plan another promotion shortly." 



WSJV-TV, South Bend-Elkharl 



Packages 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



37 



TV RESULTS continued 



BUILDING SUPPLIES & LUMBER 

SPONSOR: Flanders Lumber & Building AGENCY: Direct 

Supply, Inc. 

Capsule case history: Television has brought prosperity to 
Flanders Lumber & Building Supply, Inc., Essex Junction, 
Vt. Using a single late-night announcement, Tuesdays, 
11 p.m.. on WC AX-TV, Burlington, Flanders registered 
the best January to May in the company's history, 25% 
more than its best year. The company began its first tele- 
vision campaign in May, 1957. The commercial used was 
a live presentation by a local announcer emphasizing a 
complete line of building service, including everything from 
building plans to a single piece of lumber. By the end of 
the summer, the once-weekly announcement was producing 
such good results that Flanders placed 80% of its weekly ad 
budget in tv. Response to the increased schedule changed 
the entire operation: in a year, the company has added 540 
square feet of storage space for retail products and is now 
constructing 2.600 additional square feet. "It was WCAX- 
TV," said W. D. Flanders, pres., "that made this possible." 



WCAX-TV, Burlington, Vt. 



Announcements 



COFFEE 



SPONSOR: Folger Coffee AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: KTVU, San Francisco, suddenly 
received rights to televise the NCAA basketball playoffs, 10 
March and 15 March. KTVU offered sponsorship of the 
games to Folgers, a sizable West Coast coffee distributor 
at a time when the company was completing a large-scale 
campaign for their instant coffee using all media, in which 
they had met with considerable success. Folgers made a 
snap decision to participate and promote public relations by 
bringing the San Francisco audience important local view- 
ing fare. "When the playoff sponsorship was offered to 
us by Channel 2, we made one of the quickest decisions in 
our advertising history," commented Peter Folger. "Now it 
looks like it was one of our best decisions. The sportscasts 
did an outstanding public relations job for us, but at the 
same time they were a big sales builder. The hundreds of 
letters praising the Folger-sponsored telecast have under- 
scored the point that no good-will effort is ever wasted." 

KTVU, San Francisco PURCHASE: Half-Sponsorships 

38 



COSMETICS 



SPONSOR: Avon Cosmetics 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: Helen Church, supervisor for Avon 
Representatives in 16 mid-Missouri counties, purchased five 
spots a week on KOMU-TV, Columbia, Mo. These were 
scheduled to precede "Campaign Fifteen," a three-week 
intensive sales drive for Avon Representatives. The spots 
ran adjacent to various NBC programing throughout the 
day; two were in Queen For A Day, and one in Matinee 
Theatre. The cost was $80 on the station's five-plan. When 
Avon's drive was over, representatives of the 16-county 
district had experienced a 50% sales increase over the same 
period last year. Women in the area were actually waiting 
for an Avon saleswoman to call, some of the representatives 
reported. Because of heavy sales, Helen Church renewed 
this schedule on KOMU-TV. Although some of the increase 
was due to natural growth, she credits the major portion of 
the campaign's success to tv. "On all sides I hear glowing 
reports of the impact of tv on our customers," she says. 



KOMU-TV, Columbia, Mo. 



PURCHASE: Announcements and 
Participations 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 

SPONSOR: Gustafson's Dairy AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Gustafson's Dairy of Green Cove 
Springs, Fla., milk producers and distributors, made their 
first tv buy on WJXT-TV, Jacksonville, in February, 1952, 
as a sponsor of a local live hunting-fishing program. Broth- 
ers Ed and Noel Gustafson wanted to see if tv could build 
their business at a faster pace. Switching all their advertis- 
ing to tv, they studied the results carefully: over a six-year 
period, steadily increasing their tv advertising as they went 
along, the brothers increased their territory from five to 20 
counties. Despite heavy competition from other distribu- 
tors, sales growth exceeded many times the population 
growth of Jacksonville, Orlando and surrounding counties. 
Thoroughly convinced of the power of tv, they now sponsor 
on alternate weeks the syndicated films State Trooper on 
WJXT-TV and 26 Men on WDBO-TV in Orlando, plus a 
hunting-fishing show. Ed Gustafson says: "We don't want 
to be without television. It's responsible for our success." 



WJXT-TV, Jacksonville 



SPONSOR 



Programs 



3 JANUARY 1959 



TV RESULTS continued 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



SPONSOR: Sears & Roebuck AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Sears & Roebuck's suburban store 
in Manchester. Connecticut, recently built a huge summer 
"Warehouse Sale'" business through the use of a saturation 
tv spot schedule on WHCT, Hartford. Using tv spot for the 
first time, the store bought 20 announcements, minutes and 
20's, which were scheduled throughout the day during a 
three-day period prior to the sale. By displaying leading 
items from the Summer Hardlines Department, Sears was 
able to see immediate results from the items advertised. Roy 
Rippman. manager of the Sears store located in the new 
Manchester parkade. reporting the campaign's success, said: 
"Where advertising in other media had previously drawn 
customers from only Manchester, tv drew a greater number 
of customers from as far as 30 miles away." As a result, 
several other stores in the Manchester parkade have joined 
Sears for a combined Parkade television promotion on 
WHCT and have set up schedules for the season. 



WHTC, Hartford 



Announcements 



DOGS 



SPONSOR: Ann's Kennels AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Ann's Kennels, in Paw Paw. 111., 
all of 50 miles south of Rockford, bought three one-minute 
spots in The Roddy Mac Show, telecast on Wednesdays from 
1:30 to 5 p.m. Starting almost immediately, Ann's Kennels 
-Luted selling puppies like hot dogs. The kennels followed 
up their initial spot buy with the purchase of a full five- 
minute segment of the same once-a-week program. Sales, 
which had been brisk since the spot campaign, increased sig- 
nificantly. In fact so many dog purchasers jammed into Paw 
Paw that the town's only restaurant had to hire extra help 
!to serve the hordes of hungry dog lovers on their way to 
\nn ? Kennels. On the Fourth of July weekend alone, the 
kennel sold over $2,500 worth of dogs. People from all over 
W HEX-TV land are buying their puppies in out-of-the-way 
Paw Paw. and business at Ann's is the greatest in the firm's 
10-year history. "I am completely sold on tv, and do not in- 
tend to use any other medium." said the kennel's owner. 



FERTILIZER 



SPONSOR: Schuler Fertilizer Companj ^GENC\ : Direct 

Capsule case history: Schuler Fertilizer Company of 
Marshall, Minnesota purchased a schedule on KELO-TV, 
Sioux Falls. South Dakota to advertise Pep, a plant ferti- 
lizer. KELO-TV operates booster stations in Reliance, S. D. 
(KPLO-TV) and Florence, S. D. (KDLO-TVl, which cam 
all programing and announcements transmitted by the 
mother station in Sioux Falls. No other medium was used 
for the campaign. After the campaign had been underwax 
a few weeks, Schuler experienced marked increases in their 
8-ounce Pep sales. Of particular importance was the facl 
that their sales curve showed increases for the smaller size 
Pep. Later in the campaign, sales for the larger <°>-ounce 
bottle showed a rapid climb — evidence that viewers had 
tried the smaller size with results. Schuler had succeeded in 
placing over 3,500 bottles of Pep within the coverage area 
of KELO-TV and its two booster stations. "We must give 
credit where credit it due." said sales manager Daniels. 



KELO-TV, Sioux Falls 



Announcement* 



FLOUR 



WREX-TV, Rockford 



Program 



SPONSOR: Mooresville Flour Mills, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: As sponsor of Joe Smith's Southern 
Playboys, on WSOC-TV, Charlotte, N. C, Mooresville Flour 
Mills, Inc., of Mooresville, has found a program that de- 
livers heavy sales in the Charlotte market. For the past 
three months, since Mooresville began sponsoring Joe 
Smith's Southern Playboys, the company reports marked in- 
creases in flour, corn meal and feed sales. The major por- 
tion of the customers said they had heard the announce- 
ments on WSOC-TV. With the aid of WSOC-TV's produc- 
tion staff and the air salesmanship of Joe Smith and his 
Playboys, the Mooresville announcements were given high 
entertainment value. Not only did regular customers make 
more frequent purchases, but a great many new accounts 
were opened which Mooresville attributes directly to the 
television program. "Adding new accounts is of even great- 
er importance than are sales increases alone."' said Joe Gil- 
ley. Jr. "Vie are planning to use this program indefinitely." 



WSOC-TV, Charlotte 



PURCHASE: Sponsorship 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



39 




The Piedmont Industrial Crescent is a unique concentration 
of buying power ... a vast "area laboratory". . . stretching 
across the productive Piedmont section of North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Virginia. 

It is a vast urban complex created by bustling cities, 
booming industry and big agricultural purchasing power where 
millions of your customers WORK, EARN, SPEND. 

Strategically located at the hub of this big year-round 
market is WFMY-TV. . . the most powerful selling 
influence, by far. 



^\ This Is North Carolina's Interurbia 

, . .The largest metropolitan market in 
the two Carolinas. Here, WFMY-TV 
dominates because it serves . . . sells. 




uufnfiu-tv 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Represented by Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Inc., New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Boston, Detroit 



40 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 1959 



TV RESULTS continued 



FOOD 

SPONSOR: General Foods Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: German cooking chocolate was 
called a "dead" item by grocers and distributors in the 
Greensboro, N. C, territory until Cordelia Kelly of WFMY- 
TV's What's Cooking Today show brought it back to life. 
Cordelia baked a German chocolate cake on her program, 
offered the recipe free to viewers. So far, she's filled 2,589 
requests for the recipe — and people still ask for it. Accord- 
ing to E. J. Fraylick, General Foods Corp. salesman located 
in Greensboro, "Salesmen in our territory (including Greens- 
boro, Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Durham and 
Salisbury) have racked up 1,637% of our first quarter 
budget on German chocolate." Fraylick attributed the out- 
standing sales record to Cordelia's cake-baking on television, 
"and sending out the 2,500-plus recipes the viewers asked 
for." The sales technique also proved the value of the inte- 
grated commercial as an effective sales message, giving the 
advertising an additional validity and believability factor. 

WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. Participation 



FOOD STORE 



SPONSOR: B&H Food Store AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: When B&H Food Store of Mobile 
abandoned print some three years ago because of unsatis- 
factory results, they purchased full sponsorship of Ziv's 
Highway Patrol, seen Thursdays from 8 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
on WALA-TV, Mobile, Alabama. The 24-hour, seven-day-a- 
week store has renewed the show for three consecutive 
seasons. Despite the fact that a local chain store does more 
than 40% of the area's grocery volume, B&H has been able 
to boast a better than average sales volume which increases 
with each succeeding year of sponsorship. The store attrib- 
utes the rise to the air selling of Jim McNamara. WALA-TV 
national sales manager, who, they insist, must do the com- 
mercials. The client claims that when he is off-camera, sales 
volume dips. An oddity of the B&H campaign is their fore- 
going the third commercial: "In order that you may enjoy 
the remainder of Highway Patrol to conclusion and with- 
out interruption B&H relinquishes its commercial time." 

WALA-TV, Mobile Film show 



* 



FURNITURE 



SPONSOR: New York Furniture Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: In 1957, Emil Berkowitz, owner of 
the New York Furniture Co., with five stores in the Denver 
area, found himself in a tough financial situation. His regu- 
lar newspaper advertising failed to attract sufficient business. 
He decided to try tv — and if that failed, he would be forced 
to go out of business. Berkowitz bought a Saturday night 
20th Century-Fox feature movie on KBTV. 10 p.m. to con- 
clusion of film, costing $750 per program. Called the New 
York Furniture Theatre, the program featured the stores' 
annual warehouse sale on its premiere night. Since his 
stores remain open weekends, tv had to prove its pulling pow- 
er the following day. "It was the greatest one-day sale in our 
49-year history," Berkowitz reported. "Over 3.500 custom- 
ers crowded into the store, buying $32,000 in merchandise 
in 12 hours." Currently, he puts 50' \ of his budget into 
television, limiting his summer advertising campaign entirely 
to tv because it brings "faster and more dependable results." 



KBTV, Denver. Colo. 



Program 



FURNITURE 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR: Fowler Furniture Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Fowler Furniture Co. of Tyler. 
Texas, believes that tv will move its merchandise. They have 
been a steady advertiser on KLTV since October 1956. To 
cite one example: In a recent promotion for dining room 
suites, 10 April thru 18 April, Fowler advertised its sets 
priced at $29.95, $39.95 and $59.95 each. At the conclu- 
sion of the campaign Fowler had sold 30 sets at an average 
price of $50 per set. In addition to the advertised suites, 
the company sold 26 other dinettes priced from $69.95 to 
$139.95, bringing the average price for each suite sold to 
$70. Fowler used three sports shows. 6:15-6:25 p.m., 
Thursday. Tuesda\ and Thursday during the 10-da) cam- 
paign. Each show carried two 1 -minute participations at 
which lime a sample set was displayed. Customers came 
from a 10-mile radius of Tyler to purchase the advertised 
specials. Since Fowler put the major portion of his ad 
budget into television his sales have steadil) increased. 

KLTV, Tyler PURCHASE: Sponsorship 

II 



TV RESULTS continued 



GAS 



SPONSOR: Piedmont Natural Gas Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Seven years ago. natural gas was 
introduced into the Charlotte area. Due to the newness of 
the product, a certain amount of natural resistance was 
encountered. In order to combat the problem, the Piedmont 
Natural Gas Company turned to television. They decided 
to sponsor a weather telecast on WSOC-TV. Charlotte, N. C, 
to link natural gas with a valuable public service program 
in the public mind. For seven years. Piedmont continued 
sponsorship of Channel 9 Weather, and watched acceptance, 
sales and good will grow. Each year, company officials 
watched with satisfaction as more and more people turned 
to gas. In July of 1958 so widespread was the acceptance 
of natural gas, that the company was enabled to reduce rates 
to their residential and commercial customers. The company 
attributes a good part of the switching to natural gas to the 
show. "Your station has played a major part in our suc- 
cess," said J. J. Sheehan, Piedmont v.p. in charge of sales. 



WSOC-TV, Charlotte 



Weather program 



GROCERS & SUPERMARKETS 



SPONSOR: Graceffa & Sons 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: To win a larger share of food 
volume in Rockford, 111., Graceffa & Sons switched a portion 
of its budget to tv. Graceffa was spending $125 weekly on 
ads in the local newspaper, but sales were not satisfactory. 
Th« supermarket decided upon a single weekly 60-second 
spot on WREX-TV, Rockford. Each announcement was 
written to spotlight an employee and, at the same time, give 
the store a personal touch. In one spot, one of the check- 
out girls or meat managers appeared on the screen to quote 
the best buys. Within four weeks the Graceffa management 
saw concrete sales results. Following this success they im- 
mediately added another spot — again sales increased — and 
again Graceffa increased the budget allocation by purchas- 
ing a quarter-hour co-sponsorship of Roddy Mac. Now 80% 
of Graceffa's advertising budget is devoted to television — 
an increase of 350% ! In the time Graceffa & Sons has been 
using the television medium sales have increased 25%. 



WREX-TV, Rockford 



42 



PURCHASE: Announcements & co-spon- 
sorship in Roddy Mac 



GROCERY & SUPERMARKETS 

SPONSOR: Safeway Stores, Inc. AGENCY: Manchester Advtg., Inc. 
Capsule case history: Safeway Stores has used television 
in the Washington, D. C, area for two major reasons: to 
foster solid relations within the community by providing 
good family entertainment; to sell its top quality grocery, 
meats and produce. Safeway has sponsored a full-length 
feature film, Safeway Theatre, on WMAL-TV for the past 
eight years (and uses spot on two other tv stations). The 
store stresses soft sell in all its commercials with a mini- 
mum of interruptions during the program. "Whenever a 
new store is opened in the area, the groundwork is laid 
through the good-will created by Safeway Theater," said 
Dick Williams, director of radio and television for Manches- 
ter Advtg. Since the chain began sponsoring Safeway The- 
atre, the program has rated as the No. 1 local tv show in the 
market. "I am confident that our television advertising in- 
vestment has paid substantial dividends," said Burton War- 
ner, ad mgr. of Washington-Richmond Safeway Stores, Inc. 



WMAL-TV, Washington, D. C. 



PURCHASE: Safeway Theatre 



LADIES' DRESSES 

SPONSOR: Cas Walker Supermarkets AGENCY: Tennessee Valley 

Advtg. Agency 

Capsule case history: You don't ordinarily expect to see| 
housewives trying on dresses between gondolas in a super-l 
market, but that is exactly what happened at the Cas Walker 
Chapman Highway Supermarket in Knoxville. To familiar- 
ize people with the location of the store and its services. 
Walker purchased 4,400 ladies' dresses and advertised them 
for $2.99 on three tv programs. WBIR-TV one-shotted the 
announcements on the Amos , n Andy Show on a Tuesda) 
night, 6:30 to 7:00 p.m., and on the Cas Walker Farm ana 
Home Hour the following night, Wednesday, 7:00 to 8:0( 
a.m.; Walker also used announcements on another statior 
on Monday of the same week. Before 8:30 a.m. on the sal< 
day, the parking lot was jammed with over 200 cars ant 
store aisles were packed. Forty-eight hours later stocks wen 
reduced to odd sizes; 24 hours later they were completel; 
sold out, necessitating cancellation of planned newspape 
advertising. Walker's objectives had been accomplished 



WBIR-TV, Knoxville, Tenn. 



SPONSOR 



Announcement 



3 JANUARY 1959 



TV RESULTS continued 



LAUNDRY & CLEANERS 

SPONSOR: Slater-White, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: For the past four months, Slater- 
White, Inc., a custom laundry of San Antonio, has been 
running 10 announcements weekly in KONO-TV's 20th Cen- 
tury Theatre, seen nightly from 10:20 p.m. to conclusion. 
The campaign cost Slater-White slightly more than $4,300 
for the 16 weeks. The firm which is well known in San 
Antonio for its deluxe laundry operation and has a reputa- 
tion for quality work at above average prices, uses the 
slogan, "A little more — but so much better," to sell its story. 
During the four-month trial period, the campaign surpassed 
all other advertising campaigns in the laundry's history. 
"More customers came in as a result of our tv campaign on 
KONO than from any other form of advertising we have 
used," said Orville Slater, owner of the concern. Each de- 
partment of the cleaning and laundry firm showed substan- 
tial increases. As a result of the outstanding sales power of 
tv, Slater-White set up a year's campaign on KONO-TV. 



KONO-TV, San Antonio 



PURCHASE: Announcements in 
20th Century Theatre 



MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS 

SPONSOR: Golden Jersey Creamery AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: In April the Golden Jersey Cream- 
ery purchased five one-minute announcements per week in 
KGBT-TV's Popeye Theatre, weekdays from 4:30 to 5:00 
p.m. to announce a special kiddie promotion. The small fry 
were asked to send in labels from any Golden Jersey prod- 
uct. The youngster who sent in the most labels during the 
'•ampaign would receive a Shetland pony. In a scant six 
weeks Golden Jersey has received an unbelievable 1,000,000 
labels from every corner of the Rio Grande Valley. "We are 
thoroughly convinced that our KGBT-TV schedule has done 
more for our sales than any other medium we have ever 
used," said E. B. Braden, manager and part-owner. "Day- 
time television really delivers the audience for us. Milk sales 
have already increased approximately 10% since the start 
jf the campaign, which represents a much larger increase in 
product output than we get from other media." Braden ex- 
pects sales to rise higher before conclusion of the campaign. 

KGBT.TV, Harlingen 



PURCHASE: Annomncements in 
Popeye Theatre 



MILK & MILK PRODUCTS 

SPONSOR: Foremost Dairies AGENCY: Dave Bennett & Assoc. 
Capsule case history: Beginning in September and 
running through November 1957, Foremost Dairies of La 
Feria, Texas, ran one announcement in Steve Donovan 
Western Marshall, Saturday mornings from 10:30 to 11:00, 
on KGBT-TV, Harlingen, Texas. Youngsters were asked to 
cut the "F's" from the Foremost products, and send them 
to KGBT-TV. Some products have larger "F's" than others 
and are priced higher. Points were assigned according to 
the letter size and three prizes were offered for those send- 
ing in the most points: a bicycle, portable radio and a 
badminton set. The results: Over a quarter of a million 
Foremost labels were received from all sections of the Rio 
Grande Valley and surrounding area. Foremost Dairies 
reported a 10% increase in milk sales in the Valley alone; 
figures on other Foremost products also showed a marked 
increase. "Tv is the most powerful advertising medium I 
have ever seen," remarked John White, owner of the Fore- 
most dealership. "We plan to increase our tv schedules." 
KGBT-TV, Harlingen, Tex. PURCHASE: Announcements 



MOVIE 

SPONSOR: Howco Exchange AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: "Rodan," a recent fiction release, 
was advertised on WSOC-TV, Charlotte, N. C, by Howco 
Exchange, a regional film distributor. At the suggestion of 
WSOC-TV, Howco purchased a tv schedule on the station's 
25-plan. Howco had used television in other areas of the 
South but only WSOC-TV was bought in Charlotte. The 
local theater which carried the film did heavy business. The 
movie house drew an almost capacity crowd each time the 
picture ran. Movie houses in Gastonia, Monroe, Albermarle, 
Salisbury and Rock Hill, all within the station's coverage 
area, which also showed the film, had similar successes. In 
fact, every theater running the film within a 75-mile area 
of Charlotte met with surprising box office receipts. Theaters 
playing the picture outside of WSOC-TV's coverage pattern 
did not do nearly as well as those in the Charlotte coverage 
area. "You can be assured we will use tv on our next cam- 
paign," stated Scott Eett, the branch manager of Howco. 



WSOC-TV, Charlotte. N. C 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



Announcements 



i:< 



TV RESULTS continued 



PAINT 

SPONSOR: Dagastino"s Wallpaper and Paint Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The most difficult time of the year 
to sell paint is traditionally during February and January. 
Nevertheless, the Dagastino brothers bought a 10-plan of 
six 60-second and four 10-second spots on WHBQ-TV's, 
Memphis, Million Dollar Movie. Using only four of the 10 
announcements, they advertised Texolite and Super Kem- 
Tone on a Thursday and Friday evening in February. On 
Saturday, the biggest snow of the year hit Memphis. Yet, 
sales for the day were $300. They claim that their volume 
totaled 90% of all paint sales made in the city that day. 
A normal Saturday's volume under ideal conditions is only 
S150. They estimate their sales for the month of February 
to be 80% of all the total of the more than 100 retail 
paint businesses in Memphis. Dagastino's has ordered three 
more 10-plans, on WHBQ-TV, and has already formulated 
summer plans for additional advertising on WHBQ-TV. 



PROCESSED FOODS 



WHBQ-TV, Memphis 



PURCHASE: Announcements in MDM 



POWER MOWERS 



SPONSOR: Hunt-Gibson Furniture Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: The Hunt-Gibson Furniture Co. de- 
cided to combat mounting competition in the South Bend- 
Elkhart area, by putting a large portion of its advertising 
dollar into television. Some six months ago the store pur- 
chased ten 10-second spots a week — five in the afternoon and 
five in the evening — on WSJV-TV, South Bend-Elkhart, Ind., 
at a cost of $76.40 per week. During the last three weeks 
of May, Hunt used 30 of its announcements — 15 in Class A 
time and 15 in Class B time — to advertise power lawn mow- 
ers. The cost to Hunt's on WSJV-TV's 10-plan: $229.20. 
When the campaign ended, Hunt-Gibson's entire stock of 
mowers was sold out, representing more than $5,000 in gross 
sales. "We are using television because it delivers more 
sales impressions per dollar invested than any other medium 
in the South Bend-Elkhart market," said Ellsworth W. Gib- 
son, owner. Hunt-Gibson plans to continue using WSJV- 
TV indefinitely, the company told the station. 



SPONSOR: Scudder Food Products AGENCY: Mottl & Siteman 

Capsule case history: Scudder Food Products, one of the 
largest regional food product manufacturers on the West 
Coast has used tv in almost all of their major campaigns. 
They now sponsor one-half of the syndicated film series 
Whirlybirds, 7:30 to 8:00 p.m., on KHJ-TV, Los Angeles. 
Scudder chose Whirlybirds as a vehicle to advertise two of 
their processed food products, potato chips and peanut 
butter, which sell for approximately 15^ and 35^ respec- 
tively. About seven months after the program went on the 
air, Scudder offered a special model "helicopter" as a pre- 
mium for 50^ and proof of purchase of one of the adver- 
tised products. In less than 13 weeks after the offer had 
been made, they had distributed 66,000 of the toy "egg 
beaters" throughout the Los Angeles market area. Tv ad 
vertising formed the backbone of the premium offering 
Scudder has renewed for a 52-week firm schedule on KHJ 
TV as a result of the tremendous response to their schedule 



WSJV-TV, South Bend 



PURCHASE: Announcements 



KHJ-TV, Los Angeles 



PURCHASE: Half-Sponsorship of 
Whirlybirds 



RESTAURANT 



SPONSOR: 



Caniglia's Pizzeria & 
Steak House 



AGENCY: Pleskach' 
and Smith 



Capsule case history: In the nine-year history of Omaha 
television, Caniglia's Pizzeria and Steak House had never' 
advertised in this medium. Pleskach and Smith, Caniglia's' 
advertising agency, recommended a television campaign emM 
ploying daytime spots and one nighttime announcement.] 
KETV was selected to kick off the campaign utilizing a day , 
time 5-plan supplemented by one spot in the 9:35 movie Fri 1 
day evenings. The purpose was to announce the grand re* 
opening of the restaurant after its remodeling, and to inforrr 
customers and prospective customers of the much larger seat 
ing accommodations now available. Even though the weathei , 
was inclement the opening-day crowd was overwhelming l 
Every table was taken and people were waiting to be seated 
"Our client is immensely pleased with the over-all results o 
tv advertising," wrote Pleskach. "My eyes have been reall; 
opened to the possibilities of tv, and the company is con 
sidering increasing its tv budget." 



KETV, Omaha 



Announcement 



44 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



M Mother Hubbard 
j would flip! 




it little old cupboard dilemma of 
's was nothing, really. 



Qsider Joe Foy, now. He's General Man- 
[' of Spartan Stores, Inc., of Grand 

ids. Behind him is his new 310,000 
lire foot warehouse. When this picture 

taken, all those acres and acres of cup- 

d had yet to be filled. 



once that's done, Joe's job is just bare- 
iarted. He's got to turn right around 
proceed to empty it — and then fill it 
eai in and empty it again — umpteen times 
r, and do it year after year. 



But, whereas Dame Hubbard contemplated 
her project with knitted brow, Joe ap- 
proaches his eagerly and with confidence. In 
the twelve years he's been boss at Spartan, 
volume has increased 1,000%. It now 
grosses more than 60 million dollars a year. 
In all, Joe serves more than 500 stores all 
over Michigan. 

Joe is a modern grocery merchandiser, us- 
ing modern techniques. He says, "The sale 
of grocery products requires effective pre- 
selling in top-notch advertising media. We 
know WOOD and WOOD-TV can do this 
pre-selling job competently." 



Your sales manager knows the importance 
of distribution in WOODland. Make certain 
that distribution is followed by sales. Keep 
a schedule on WOOD and/or WOOD-TV. 
Wherever you are, there is a Katz man to 
help you get it. 

WOOD-TV Is first- morning, noon, night. 
Monday through Sunday November '58 
ARB Grand Rapids 

WOOD-AM is first-morning, noon, night, 
Monday through Sunday-April '58 Pulse 
Grand Rapids 

Everybody in Western Michigan is a WOODwalchei 




WOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODland Center, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV - NBC Basic for Western and Central Michigan: Grand Rapids. 
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon and Lansing. WOOD - Radio - NBC. 



Problem Solved by an 
Account Executive 




Hal needed help. He was on 
his fifth ulcer trying to boost 
Florida sales. 




"Help," he cried. "We're com- 
ing," said Media. 




"Blair TV Associates said 
WCTV offers a great undupli- 
cated buy in a market that 
buys like crazy!" 




It worked so well he can af- 
ford to beat the ad manager 
at golf. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 



for North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Pliipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



TV RESULTS continued 



RESTAURANT 



SPONSOR: Breisch's Restaurant AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: For the past year and a half, 
Breisch's Restaurant has been a consistent advertiser on 
KOMU-TV, Columbia, Mo. Prior to Breisch's entry into tv, 
the restaurant had done limited promotion. The restau- 
rant now uses three 10-second Class "B" announcements 
weekly for a monthly expenditure of $117. This is the only 
advertising medium utilized. Since Breisch's began its 
schedule on KOMU-TV, sales receipts have risen 45% over 
the same period a year ago. In a recent test, they ran a spe- 
cial promotion featuring Hawaiian Night. The purchase was 
two one-minute Class "B" announcements — the only adver- 
tising used. More than 300 people were served on Hawaiian 
Night; an equal number were turned away due to the lim- 
ited seating capacity. "Tv has proved to be the best medium 
for my advertising dollar," said owner Leroy Watkins. "It 
achieves the results I want and I plan to continue using it." 



KOMU-TV, Columbia 



PURCHASE: Announcements 



SHOES 



SPONSOR: Brittain's AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Although Brittain's, one of the 
South's leading children's department stores, had had little 
experience with the television medium, they turned most of 
their advertising budget to WRAL-TV during the months of 
March and April; only a small amount was channeled to 
other media. The results well justified the expenditure. 
After reviewing the business volume for these two months, 
they netted an 18.4% increase over the same period of 
1956, and total sales exceeded any April and March in 
Brittain's history. After conferring with WRAL-TV's sales 
manager, Mr. Sam Mobley, manager of the Raleigh store, 
bought one announcement on Thursdays in Popeye, at 
which time a pair of children's shoes was shown. The total 
cost was only $210. Mobley was so impressed with the sales 
results that they have been running schedules since then with 
equal success. "We do not know of any other media that 
could have done the job so well as television," he said. 



WRAL-TV, Raleigh, N. C. 



PURCHASE: Announcements 



46 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



TV RESULTS continued 



SPORT GOODS & EQUIPMENT 



SPONSORS: Local Wholesaler and Dealers 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: A little short of a year ago, George 
A. Grenholm, manager of V. Tausche Hardware Co., a 
wholesale sports store of LaCrosse, Wis., conceived a plan 
whereby four local sports good stores, each in a different 
community of the LaCrosse trading area, would sponsor a 
show each Friday called Fite Nite Sport Nite, on WKBT, 
LaCrosse. The cost per telecast, $100, was divided propor- 
tionately among the sports outlets and Tausche Co. After 
launching the program, the sponsors found that in almost 
every case, items advertised on their show resulted in near, 
or complete, sellouts. The long-range sales potential of the 
show is demonstrated by the fact that from 70% to 90% 
of their advertising is devoted to this particular program. 
Sales figures have climbed consistently since its beginning. 
The first contract was signed for an eight-week test cam- 
paign. It was immediately renewed for an additional 26- 
week flight and again this past March for another 26 weeks. 



WKBT, LaCrosse 



PURCHASE: Programs 



SOFT DRINKS 



SPONSOR: Pepsi Cola Bottler AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: By now the local teen dance show 
is familiar to every soft drink sponsor in the United States. 
George Noland, a Pepsi Cola bottler, bought several an- 
ouncements in Dixon On Disc, Monday to Friday, 4:00 to 
i:00 p.m., on WALA-TV, Mobile, Alabama. This was a 
jioneer test show — at least for the Southeastern section of 
he United States. The trade publication "The Pepsi Cola 
, World" reported Noland's investment has been returned 
i00% ! Instead of dropping announcements from Dixon 
On Disc in the winter months, which is slow for soft drinks. 
Poland continued his campaign. Results were so good that 
te increased his schedule to one-half sponsorship of the 
how. "Since I started using this show, there has been a 
teady increase in sales," says Noland, who is going into his 
hird year with WALA-TV. The national organization was 
o impressed they bought the same type of show elsewhere. 






t, 



a tl'i 

* ALA-TV, Mobile 



PURCHASE: Half-sponsorship in 
Dixon On Disc 



SUPERMARKET 

SPONSOR: Eavey's Supermarket AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Eavey Supermarket of Fort Wa\ oe, 
Ind., has made tv the backbone of its advertising since 
it opened in August, 1956. At present, the store spends from 
60 to 65% of its advertising dollar in tv. Presently, the 
store sponsors News and Weather on WKJG-TV. Fort 
Wayne, and two other stations. Eavey first ventured into 
tv on the eve of its opening da> in Fort Wayne, when lie 
and tv star Denise Lor took viewers on a tour of the building, 
via an hour-long remote telecast. Since then, the "Eavey 
Girl," has posed in a picture under the store's facade, 
become a regular visitor to Fort Wayne homes. Eavey uses 
three girls dressed as the store's clerks; they play sales- 
ladies on seven of the supermarket's nine weekly shows. 
Eavey claims its store accounts for 20 to 25% of Fort 
Wayne's food volume. "People don't read the fine print in the 
newspaper, but on tv you have a captive audience that sees 
and hears every word," said Eavey manager Bert Mahet. 



WKJG-TV, Fort Wayne 



Programs 



TABLES 



SPONSOR: Judd Drugs AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Before Judd Drugs, a medium-sized, 
Midwestern drug chain, used tv they were skeptical of its 
pulling power; now it is a must in their advertising budget 
Their first experience on tv was with WSJV-TV, South 
Bend, Ind. Charles Judd, president of Judd Drugs, pur- 
chased full sponsorship of a half-hour syndicated film to 
be shown on Friday nights from 10:00 to 10:30 p.m. In 
order to really test the strength of tv advertising, Judd 
offered hostess tables at $1.99 each. He used just one an- 
nouncement in his show. By the end of Saturday morning 
he had distributed five dozen tables in his five stores, includ- 
ing those in Goshen and Warsaw. In addition, it was the 
biggest single Saturday morning gross they had ever known 
in the same period of any year. Traffic in other sections of 
Judd's stores increased also due to this one announcement. 
"We are more than pleased with the results of our experi- 
ment," says Judd, "and are preparing a new tv campaign." 

WSJV-TV, South Bend, Ind. PURCHASE: Program 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 






Topeka has 

1 TV Station 

WIBW-TVisit 



That's Why 

NOBODY FROM NOWHERE 

Can Saturate 

TOPEKA 

like 

WIBW-TV 

SATURATES TOPEKA 




ALL DAY -ANY DAY 

Here's why survey-proved WIBW-TV is 
your best buy for complete coverage 
of the entire Topeka Farm market. 

• WIBW-TV commands the viewing audi- 
ence. Note current survey figures: 

Share of Audience Monday-Sunday 

7:45-12 N. 12N.-6p.m. 6p.m.-12Mid. 
57.0% 50.3% 51.1% 

• In the 447 rated quarter-hours . . . 
WIBW-TV ranked FIRST. 

• In the top 15 Once-a-Week shows (with 
on average program rating of 44.13) . . . 
WIBW-TV had an average rating of 
37.69%. 

. WIBW-TV serves 38 rural and urban 
counties in the heart of Kansas . . . where 
total gross income for 1957 was 
$719,277,000.00. 1958 is a banner year. 

• WIBW-TV saturates 218,190 TV homes. 
(NCS-#3) 

• 

Survey Figures Prove 
WIBW-TV's Value 

• Not even the combined efforts of 3 dis- 
tant Kansas City TV stations can begin to 
dent the Rich Topeka Farm Market, accord- 
ing to a current survey. 



Share of Audience 

Monday-Sunday 



7:45 
12N 



12N 
6p.m. 



6 p.m. 
12Mid. 



WIBW-TV, TOPEKA 57.0% 50.3% 51.1% 
Sto. A, Kansas City 10.7 10.0 9.7 
Sta. B, Kansas City 6.1 10.4 9.6 
Sta. C, Kansas City 13.4 14.7 15.3 



WIBW-TV 

Channel 13 



CBS-ABC 
Topeka, Kansas 



REPRESENTED BY AVERY- KN0DEL, INC. 



L. 

48 



TV RESULTS continued 



TOYS 



SPONSOR: The Arcade Department Store AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Arcade Dept. Store of Fort 
Smith. Ark., has been a steady user of tv for several years. 
On Wednesday, 11 December, they ran one announcement 
on KNAC-TV, Fort Smith, to advertise their mechanical toy 
helicopters, selling for approximately $2.50. The cost to 
Arcade was $27. By noon the following day, they had sold 
out their entire stock of 234 toy whirlybirds. Arcade had 
previously ordered an additional 700 from its distributor, 
but was unable to get delivery in time to meet the demand 
created by this one tv spot. As a result, hundreds of cus- 
tomers who came in throughout the rest of the week to pur- 
chase the mechanical whirlybirds, were unable to do so. 
Arcade used no other medium for this item. "We have used 
tv in many successful campaigns before. But this is the 
most sensational turnout from just one announcement I have 
ever seen," commented Pete Wells, publicity man for Ar- 
cade. "We are now planning a comprehensive schedule." 



KNAC-TV, Fort Smith 



TRAILERS 



SPONSOR: Eastern Trailer Sales 



PURCHASE: Announcement 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: When Eastern Trailer Sales of Nor- 
folk, Va. decided to try television advertising it expected 
only moderate results. The trailer company purchased three 
five-minute segments of WAVY-TV's 10:35 P.M. Weather 
Monday through Friday immediately preceding the Early 
Late Show. The cost to Eastern for the four-week campaign 
was $1,807. A sample trailer was displayed during each 
announcement. At the outset of the campaign Eastern had 
50 mobile homes in its warehouse. When the campaign con- 
cluded Eastern was completely sold out. "We sold 19 trailers 
without having to pitch people that came in. They merely 
demanded, 'I want the trailer advertised on WAVY-TV,' " 
said Dewitt Hobbs, general manager of Eastern. Ninety of 
the 50 units sold for $66,000. The other 31 went for approxi- 
mately $2,000 apiece. This campaign had an advertising 
cost of only 2.8% of the gross. The company was forced 
to cancel all further advertising until it could replenish its 
stock. As soon as this is done they plan to renew it. 



WAVY-TV, Norfolk 



SPONSOR 



Program 



3 JANUARY 1959 




Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



3 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 
SPONSOR 

puklioations me. 



Often you can chart where a business is headed by scanning the highpoints in 
its more or less recent accomplishments : hence this review of the 1958 signifi- 
cant happenings in tv film and syndication, in particular: 

By individual topic the crests and valleys shaped up as follows: 

IMPORTANT RECRUITS TO SYNDICATION: 1958 saw many national advertis- 
ers buying into regional syndication for the first time. These included: Kellogg (this one was 
really national) , Amoco, Pillsbury, Miles Labs, Brown & Williamson, Nestle's, Rival Dog Food. 

TAPE: The big technological news of the year was tape with these consequences: 

1) All three networks and upwards of 60 stations installed tv tape facilities. 

2) A dozen or more stations started taping shows for "swap or sale." 

3) Tape regional networks kicked off sports programing. 

4) Guild's staff pioneered syndication of the new technique with two shows sold to 
stations, plus others available. 

5) However — the pessimistic side of tape in local programing is that it failed in 1958 
to attract any major ad spenders. 

NEW BUYING PATTERNS: While the backbone of film syndication last year con- 
tinued to be the regional advertiser's spread on the alternate week basis, a number of new 
tv film buying patterns appeared, such as these: 

• Program diversification: Advertisers like Schlitz bought several smaller regionals of 
varying shows instead of one big campaign, while buyers like Camels, Pabst and Sunoco, 
went into syndication on a market-by-market basis. 

• Double coverage: Ballantine may have started something new in its buy of two pro- 
grams (Highway Patrol and Bold Venture) in the same regional area. 

• Exits from syndication: Lack of the right program plus other factors took these re- 
gional buyers out of syndication last year: Hamm's, Nationwide insurant, Brylcreem, Corn 
Products and Wilson meats. 

SYNDICATION'S EXPANDING BUSINESS: Last year saw major increases in gross 
business by most of the film companies over what they did in 1957. Sample increases were: 
ABC, 62%; CBS, 20%; CNP, 80%; NTA, 41%; Screen Gems, 27%, and Ziv, 32%. 

RATINGS : More and more syndicated shows demonstrated during 1958 that they could 
gather ratings which had national measurements comparable to network shows. (For Nielsen 
ratings of 5 programs, see FILM-SCOPE, 10 May, 1958.) 

UPGRADED PROGRAMING: 1958 also saw a steady climb in program quality, es- 
pecially with better scripts and higher budgets for many syndicated shows. 

HOLLYWOOD'S NEW ROLE: With MCA taking over distribution of Paramount 
features, the last of the major pre-1948 libraries, 1958 marked the end of Hollywood's de- 
pendence on its backlogs as an important source of income. 

At the same time, Hollywood began to show fresh interest in producing for tv, 
with United Artists filming 5 series and Paramount trying to enter tape via its KTLA facili- 
ties and production-sales staff. 

THE OPTION TIME QUESTION: From the sales and rating successes of ABC TV 
affiliates with syndication in the 7:00-7:30 time strip given to them in the fall of 1958, it's 
clear that tv film is the course most stations will take in local time recaptured from net- 
work control. (For national advertisers in these time periods and for ratings successes in 
these strips, see FILM-SCOPE for 8 November and for 27 December, 1958.) 



PONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



49 




FILM-SCOPE continued 



Participating advertisers in New York daytime syndicated strips got some un- 
expected programing during the recent newspaper strike. 

WCBS-TV, for example, yanked My Little Margie, Our Miss Brooks and Life of Riley anc 
put in news daily for the duration of the crisis. 

Paradoxically, the live news fell a rating point or two short of what the strips score 
in Arbitron previously, despite the news shortage. 

COMMERCIALS: Accenting top developments in commercials production di 
ing 1958 were new developments in technique, style and approach. 

Here are a few of the milestones in the commercials field that belong to 1958: 
TAPE: Nothing had more implications for commercials in the past 12 months than 
introduction of tape. 

At the close of the year, here was tape's status: 

• In addition to the networks, tape facilities were delivered to Elliot, Unger and Elliot, to 
Filmways, to Telestudios, to Videotape Productions and to Termini Services — and notable is 
the fact they're mostly N. Y. studios. 

• Although millions were invested in tape equipment in 1958, hardly a commercial was 
delivered — except for highly active Telestudios. 

• This very fact of tape's high facilities cost drew a line which the smaller producer dared 
not cross, limiting tape experimentation and production to the larger and more 
affluent commercials makers. 

• The raging question of technical difficulties remained up in the air with opinion rang- 
ing from despair at problems to hope for new solutions. 

NEW CREATIVITY: New styles in commercials blossomed in 1958, like these: 

1) High fashion live action, which originated in luxury goods, made important in- 
roads on food, soap and beer selling moods. 

2) Slide motion, a style born with the "art film" where the camera moves and the 
subject is still, was successfully transplanted to commercials to become a main creative 
vogue of the year. 

THE NEW APPROACH: Throwing away the "hard sell" for its harshness and the 
"soft sell" for its ineffectiveness, a new selling approach emerged in 1958 that seemed to 
combine (a) impact of straight selling and (b) entertainment value of indirect approach. 

AGENCY-PRODUCER PARTNERSHIP: One of the complications of new creativity 
in 1958 resulted in a greater need for close teamwork between the agency and its pro- 
ducer — from conception through execution — especially in the field of animation. 

TRIUMPH OF LIVE ACTION: While Schwerin studies of commercials in 1955 indi- 
cated that about 8 out of 10 of all commercials used live action, in 1958 the use of live action 
climbed to a new high — with 9 out of 10 commercials using "live". 

COMMERCIALS PRE-TESTING: With more than $100 million spent in 1958 
on making commercials, surprisingly little was likely spent on evaluating them — although 
new pre-testing techniques seemed to be gaining ground. 

NEW ATTENTION TO COMMERCIALS: The new role of the commercials in the 
agency's tv outlook was characterized by one Madison Avenue executive thuswise: "1958 
was the year we finally figured out what programing was all about and switched our atten- 
tion back to the original selling tool — the commercial." 



50 



A case against talk that's either too fast or too slow seems to emerge from 
a recent Schwerin study of 350 one-minute commercials. 

It was found that commercials faster than 150 words per minute or slower than 100 faret 
poorly on the average compared to those in between. 

In other words, an audio track has its best chances when it goes at a rate some 
where between 1.5 and 2.5 words a second. 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 195? 



WhaCs happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



#M WASHINGTON WEEK 



3 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 
SPONSOR 

PUBLICATION* INO. 



The Supreme court decision in the RCA-Westinghouse sale-trade of their Cleve- 
land and Philadelphia stations could well become the most important turning point 
for the industry's Washington relations in 1959. 

The question which the high tribunal is now conjuring with has this clear-cut status: 
Not whether RCA and NBC are guilty as charged — even pure as the driven snow — but rather 
whether FCC approval of the transaction "insulates" it from pursuit hy the Justice 
Department. 

RCA and NBC contended successfully in the Appeals Court that the FCC is the expert 
agency charged with regulating broadcasting. This would mean that no other government 
agency could act against a practice the FCC had approved. Justice and the FCC appealed, 
arguing that the FCC is not expert on antitrust matters, and that Justice should have primary 
responsibility in this field. 

A good share of the Barrow Report recommendations for clipping network wings 
is at issue here. Justice has studied many of the practices the network study group opposes, 
and could move in the courts against some of them. Option time is the prime example. 

If the Supreme Court finds Justice may only advise the FCC, Justice will reiterate its be- 
lief that this practice is a per se violation of the antitrust laws. The FCC will very likely find 
it to be a "reasonable restraint of trade," which is permitted under the antitrust laws. It 
would probably merely decide to cut the number of option hours — slightly. 

If the Supreme Court finds that FCC expertise does not extend to antitrust matters, the 
FCC might surrender on the spot on option time. Even if the Commission persists, 
Justice would almost surely take the webs to the courts on the practice. 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee and 
chief Congressional foe of pay-tv, hasn't been in as much rush as he had promised 
to hold pay-tv hearings. 

The FCC has given him until the end of this session of Congress to get a bill passed 
banning the pay system, under threat of finally letting go with the long-promised trial run. 

Harris did not call hearings in December, as he had half-promised, has not yet set hear- 
ing dates. It is likely he wants to take the temperature of the new committee with its many 
soon-to-be-appointed freshmen members. 

That he will continue to do all he can to block subscription television is still certain, 
but methods and timing are not as clear. And getting a bill through Congress still seems a 
rough job. 



The Harris House Commerce Legislative Oversight subcommittee was having 
indigestion over its report on last year's stormy hearings. 

The report, probably contents of which have appeared on this page from time to time, 
will be less important than the bill which will result. This will likely be very much like nu- 
merous bills introduced, but not acted on, in the last Congress. 

The bills will stress strong penalties for improper approaches to Commissioners and for 
Commissioners who listen and provide that everything must be "on the record" in con- 
tested cases. 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



51 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



3 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

•MK80R 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



One of the major tv film companies just borrowed $3 million from a factor- 
ing outfit to help fill its immediate need for capital. 
The loan's interest rate : 11%. 

Out of the scores of evening programs that were on the air 20 years ago 
only four — at least, in title — are around today. 

They are: Amos 'n' Andy, Fibber McGee & Molly, the Lone Ranger, and Hit 
Parade. 

Booz Allen & Hamilton has hired some special marketing consultants to lend 
a hand in the survey it is conducting at J. Walter Thompson. 

The biggest and most venerable of the agency giants apparently is bent on streamlin- 
ing its operations from stem to stern. 



The agency field's continuing epidemic — mergeritis — has cut so deep by now that 
rumors about forthcoming mergers have almost taken the place of the second martini at lunch. 

Incidentally, Needham, Louis & Brorby this week stiffarmed reports that it was 
probing for a splice with Benton & Bowles. Not long ago its name was linked with 
BBDO. 

The tv networks have now got to the stage of sending out studies to the tradepapers 
rebutting a research release which the grapevine tells them is coming from a com- 
petitive network. 

A memo attached to one of these rebuttals this week noted: 

"We think it significant enough to put at your disposal as background information 
should (the competitive network) try to plant the story with your publication." 



CONCEPTS THAT DDDN'T JELL IN 1958: 

• BBDO's proposal that a tv network set aside a weekly mid-evening hour for four dif- 
ferent advertisers to use for high-grade programing during the month. 

• Wayne King staging a radio comeback via e.t.'s in behalf of Lady Esther. 



THINGS YOU CAN EXPECT TO HAPPEN IN 1959: 

• A time buyer's estimator to miscalculate the cost- 1,000 with the result that the com- 
petitive station will mutter, "Somebody's off his rocker." 

• A rep salesman on sitting down with a timebuyer discovers that he didn't bring 
along with him the requested availabilities or a study his people had put together. 

• A visiting station manager overstays the timebuyer's graciousness and the rep 
with him begins to worry whether the faux pas will be held against him. 

• Formula buying — with rating points the chief escape prop — will dominate media 
activity and not this criterion: Will it move goods? 

• Esty will caution stations about the propinquity of certain types of products. 



52 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 




Nothing else like it in Greater New York 



!C0E 



NOTHING APPROACHES THE SOUND: 

WVNJ originated the programming concept of Great 
Albums of Music. It is the only radio station in the metro- 
politan area that plays just Great Albums of Music from 
sign on to sign off every single day of the year. 

NOTHING APPROACHES THE AUDIENCE: 

The very nature of the music makes the audience pre- 
ponderantly adult. It's a rich audience, too. In one of the 

radio station of Qhe SJernark Pettis 



wealthiest counties of America (Essex — with its million 
plus population) — WVNJ dominates in audience — in 
quality of audience — and in prestige. 

NOTHING APPROACHES ITS VALUE: 

WVNJ delivers its adult, able-to-buy greater New York 
audience for less cost per thousand homes than any other 
station in the market. By every reasoning it's your very 
best buy. 

national rep: Broadcast Time Sales • New York, N. Y. • MU 4-6740 



uk, N. J.— covering New York and New Jersey 



3 JANUARY 1959 



With smaller markets often bypassed. SPONSOR ASKS: 



How do you overcome the top- 50 




With many advertisers feeling 
that only "top 50" spot schedules 
are efficient, reps tell how they 
are selling the smaller markets. 



Richard O'Connell, president, Richard 
O'Connell, Inc., New York 

This is a question with indeed a 
tremendous variation of answers and 
is often heralded with the opinions of 



Sin all 
station 
must be 
better 



as many people as are asked the 
question. 

The problem of selling national 
spot radio in medium and small sized 
markets was created by the love af- 
fair between national products and 
the top 50 to 75 markets of the coun- 
try. The love affair is now a torrid 
romance in the top 25 markets of the 
U.S., so indeed it is a problem for 
those medium-sized and smaller mar- 
kets to woo the affections of the na- 
tional product brand manager and/or 
advertising manager, and, accordingly 
his advertising agency. 

Using the first things first rule, the 
inclusion of a medium or small size 
market in the advertising plans of a 
product must be inspired locally 
through the distributor, the broker, 
district manager and/or all three of 
them. In today's picture the district 
manager of a given product has be- 
come more important than ever in 
media planning. The station that does 
not get to know his area representa- 
tives for the many national products 
sold in his area, can have little hope 
of garnering any dollars from the 
national spot field. This is no longer 
a suggestion, but a MUST. The rep- 



54 



resentative plays an important role in 
this technique in that he should be 
advised immediately of all contacts 
and meetings between station per- 
sonnel and area product representa- 
tives. It is his function, then, to 
advise the agency and to help sell 
them on the idea, else the station may 
find that the agency, who lives with 
the client day in and day out and 
who may disagree with the area rep- 
resentatives' ideas has had much time 
to talk the client out of whatever the 
area representative may have talked 
him in to. Therefore, the cardinal 
prerequisite in selling a medium or 
smaller size market in the national 
field is to have a complete two-way 
street between station and rep, carry- 
ing the story to all levels of client and 
agency decision-makers. 

Another very helpful suggestion to 
those stations in medium and smaller 
sized markets is to do everything 
within their power to simplify the 
purchase of their market, especially 
where rate structures are concerned, 
because no agency is interested in 
spending the time to buy a small mar- 
ket with a complicated rate structure 
when he has to spend an equal 
amount of time dealing with an 
equally complicated structure in a 
major market. For the most part, we 
find major markets as backward as 
the medium-sized and smaller mar- 
kets when it comes to the moderiza- 
tion of rate structures. If all small 
markets make this their rule of 
thumb, we feel it would help them 
in capturing further spot dollars. It 
is also true to say that this applies to 
the large markets as well. 

Finally, and of equal importance is 
the necessity for the smaller station 
operator to keep material on his sta- 
tion updated. Trying to sell a small 
or medium-sized market, using 1950 
census and a 1954 rating survey is a 
waste of time for all, especially the 
agency, so if you're a small guy 
you're almost in the position of 
having to be better than the big guy. 
It was ever thus!!! 



Don Waterbury, national sales mgr., 
Ram beau, Vance, Hopple, Inc., New York 

In apportioning media budgets, na- 
tion advertisers, in most cases, are 
guided by sales figures for the previ- 
ous sales periods. The smaller the 
market, the larger the share a given 
product must have, in order to reach 
a gross sales figure that will justify 
an advertising expenditure. This sys- 
tem, sound as it may be, obviously 
penalizes the smaller markets — in- 
cluding markets which are doing a 
better job, percentage-wise, of moving 
a product than larger cities which get 
the business. 

Ironically, an advertiser buying a 
one, two or three station market has 
much greater opportunity of acheiv- 
ing a dominant share of the market 
for his product, then he would in a 
major metropolitan area. This is true 
for a number of reasons: 

1) There are not as many brands 
competing in a product category. 

2) Potent in-store displays, and 
other merchandising aids, are much 
more easily arranged because of less 
competition from allied media and 
the much greater probability that the 
station management and retailers en- 
joy a personal relationship. 



Small 

stations 

must 

sell 

harder 



Furthermore, with fewer competing 
radio stations, it is probable that your 
buy will net a larger share of audi- 
ence than in multi-station markets. 

I have found the most successful 
methods of getting national dollars 
into a smaller market is for station 
management to make contact with the 
broker's wholesalers and jobbers on a 
local level. A broker in a small mar- 
ket feels that his job is just as tough 
as it is for a broker in a larger mar 




SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 195< 



market psychology? 



ket. "Mom and Pop" store are every- 
where, and getting Mom and Pop to 
take that extra case is tough no 
matter where they are located. 

The small town hroker, apprised of 
the fact that his counterpart 90 miles 
down the highway in a market twice 
the size of his is getting advertising 
help, while he gets none, is going to 
raise all kinds of you-know-what the 
next time the company salesman 
comes into town. 

The representative salesman must 
furnish station management with in- 
formation of accounts breaking in 
similar and larger markets in the 
region. Then he participates in a 
two-pronged attack: the station men 
working on the local broker and the 
representative salesman selling the 
agency buyer. 

Here's an actual case in point con- 
cerning a group of automobile dealers 
who are in the fringe county of a 
dealer's association. The association 
fostered extensive and expensive tv 
campaigns in the major market with 
the association's boundaries, but there 
was no penetration into the county in 
question. Our company contacted a 
dealer who was on the advertising 
committee, and discovered that each 
dealer pays an advertising fee for 
each car he receives. We informed 
the dealers in this non-covered county. 
He went into action, and so did we. 
The dealers in this county are now 
going to get their money's worth. 



»arl L. Schuele, general manager, 
Broadcast Time Sales, New York 

While Broadcast Time Sales is 
lainl) a major market representative 
nth stations in the top 25 markets, 
ve do have some stations in markets 
lut of top 50. 

We have attacked the problems of 
lese stations and their markets 
iggressivel) . 

The Thorns radio stations in North 
Carolina are all in markets not in 
he top 50. Individually these are all 
pne stations and do well in getting 




their share of the national spot radio 
money that goes into their markets. 
But, of course, there is a tendency for 
many national advertisers to overlook 
these secondary markets for radio. 



National 
advertisers 
need local 
stations 



This, as a matter of fact, is why 
SPONSOR wants this question answered. 

First, we realize that in secondary 
markets there is less competition from 
other media: fewer television stations, 
fewer newspapers, and less magazine 
circulation. So we are convinced that 
important national advertisers really 
need strong local radio stations in 
these markets to effectively sell their 
products. Consequently the Broad- 
cast Time Salesman is proud to 
recommend to a timebuyer. or even 
an account executive, that such a 
market should be included in radio 
plans. 

Second, we, together with the man- 
agement of Thorns Radio, have put 
the North Carolina stations into a 
unified group. This makes them — 
combined — a big market. They cover 
more than 4,000,000 people and that 
is more people than live in the fifth 
largest market, Detroit. In addition, 
this Thorns Group of North Carolina 
is sold with one billing source and 
with a combination discount. 

Since these are excellent stations in 
themselves, when they are combined 
as a single buy to cover the homes of 
4,000,000 people, it is a dramatic and 
important story. This story is so im- 
portant that we take it not just to 
timebuyers, but also to media direc- 
tors, account executives and advertis- 
ing managers. 

Frankly, the response we've gotten 
has been so heartening that we are 
completely convinced that this is the 
(Cont'd next page) 




wilkes-barre 
/hazleton 

WfLK 

Leads all other 

WILKES-BARRE Stations 

with 

GREATEST 

LISTENERSHIP 

in 65 of the 72 '/« hours 
from 6 A.M. to Midnight 
(Pulse September— 1958) 



STATION 


1st 


Tie 


WILK 


65 


5 


Sta. B 


2 


5 


Sta.C 









For the best 
Inside Coverage 

of 

PENNSYLVANIA'S 

3rd LARGEST 

MARKET 

you must 

use 







' WILKES-BARRE 
PA. 

LA Call 
AVERY-KNODEL 
\S for details 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



55 







proper way to sell good stations in 
secondary markets of importance. I 
would add. however, one word of 
caution to others who might try the 
same strategy : I doubt that this com- 
bining of stations would be really 
effective unless all the stations were 
really good advertising vehicles. 

We feel we are lucky because the 
Thorns stations of North Carolina 
meet these requirements with flying 
colors. 

Bob Dore, Bob Dore Associates, N. Y. 

A buyer at one of the larger radio 
accounts recently said, "Radio sta- 
tions are in the advertising business 
and yet most of them do not know 
how to promote their own facilities, 
and they're reluctant to spend their 
own advertising dollars. Some of the 
printed material attached to availa- 



Plun 
to get 
those 
ad dollars 



bilities that come across my desk are 
so poorly written that I get the idea 
that the station can't do much better 
for a product on the air," he con- 
cluded. 

There are plenty of national dollars 
waiting for radio stations not in the 
first 50 markets. But the station 
must aggressively plan to get those 
dollars, and must work closely with 
its rep to sell the market as well as the 
station. Here are some suggestions: 

Advertise the market as well as the 
station. . . . Run a consistent cam- 
paign in the trade journals selling the 
importance of the market as well as 
the station. WNAX in Yankton, 
South Dakota, a small town, did just 
that and many of the larger cam- 
paigns have a budget allocated to 
Yankton. 

Compile available market informa- 
tion. . . . Gather all of the existing 
market information available for your 
area from the Chambers of Com- 
merce, local business organizations, 
census reports, Nielsen, Hooper and 
Pulse reports, Standard Rate & Data, 
Sales Management and other sources. 
Prepare an attractive, colorful bro- 
chure compiling such information, 
using charts and graphs rather than 



56 



large blocks of copy. Periodically 
send such material to agency people. 
Provide a sufficient number of such 
brochures to your representatives so 
he can send out mailings to buyers, 
media directors, etc., and attach them 
to availabilities. 

Contact dealers, distributors and 
brokers. . . . Most stations don't do 
this because such sales activity is not 
productive of immediate business at 
the time of the contact. Dealers, dis- 
tributors and brokers can usually ex- 
ert sufficient pressure at the account 
level to get the market put on the list, 
and in some instances get a specific 
allocation for a particular station. 
When a station makes such contacts, 
advise your rep so the rep salesmen 
can make the appropriate contacts at 
the agency level. 

Set up a realistic merchandising 
program. . . . Unless a station has a 
clearly defined merchandising pro- 
gram, the rep's usual phrase that the 
"station will set up a merchandising 
program based upon the budget" falls 
on deaf ears. It means absolutely 
nothing. Stations with a definite and 
concrete merchandising plan are 
given serious consideration by agency 
buyers because it is known at the 
time of the buy how many stores will 
be visited, how many displays set up, 
local ads run, etc. Several accounts 
buy stations with aggressive merchan- 
dising plans primarly for the mer- 
chandising! 

Program to get the ratings. . . . 
Most stations play the same tunes, 
paraphrase the same news and echo 
back the same weather reports. The 
station that gets the largest audience 
is the one with the "alive" sound. 
Cut down a lot of the chatter, it's 
dead air. Select tunes which have a 
wide listening appeal. Run station 
"promos" either in the form of 



jingles or some other "live" sound 
selling the call letters. Create an 
awareness of your station in your 
own market. Don't be lulled into a 
sense of false security that you have 
the best station and everybody listens. 
Radio listeners are fickle. Sell your 
call letters on the air, and with 
printed media ... so when the rat- 
ing gal calls or visits the area, your 
station will get a fair break. Remem- 
ber that ratings are created — they 
just don't happen. 

Don't cut your rate. . . . Have one 
rate for similar accounts and don't 
offer a lower rate to account repre- 
sentatives who visit the station. The 
whole advertising business is one big 
family. Word gets around very quick- 
ly about deals that can be secured 
from a station and when that does 
happen . . . agency buyers are re- 
luctant to buy the station for fear 
of being called to the front office to 
explain why they paid more than 
other accounts using the station. 
Radio stations are cutting their own 
throats with two-faced rate policies. 
Sell results — not price. 

Monitor your competition. . . . 
Make sure you know what the other 
stations have on the air. Compile a 
list of all local accounts for your rep, 
to let him know that most of the 
local business men who base their 
decision on their own listening habits 
and sales results, use the station. 
Compile a list of all national accounts 
in your market for your rep. If you 
think the ratings are not truly rep- 
resentative of your listening audience, 
see that your rep calls on the buyers 
of all of those accounts. 

The plan to get national advertis- 
ing dollars can be compared to an 
electrical magnet. The more "charge" 
you put into the plan, the more you'll 
pick up. ^ 






f i 



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Mountain 

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HEADQUARTERS: SALT LAKE CITY 



THE NATION'S MOST SUCCESSFUL REGiONAL NETWORK 



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In the 9 county area of 
THE RICHEST HILL ON EARTH 

PULSE Feb. 1958 



DENVER - CONTACT YOUR AVERY-KNODEL MAN 



s?on ;os 



3 JANUARY 1959 



ARTH 



DR. DICHTER 

{Cont'd from page 27) 

imagination of their audience." 

A timebuyer might ask, "What 
made a station like KPRC turn to 
Dr. Dichter for a motivational stud\ ? 
A lot of radio buying is still by the 
numbers, let's face it. So why this 
interest in a station's personality and 
in audience psychology?" 

The answer to this — to the rela- 
tionship between station personality 
and its ratings or audience composi- 
tion — is explained by Dr. Koeves in 
the motivational report to KPRC: 

"When we speak of the personality 
of a radio station or of any other 
medium or even any product."' writes 
Dr. Koeves, "essentially we are speak- 
ing of the same kinds of judgments 
we bring into our contacts with hu- 
man beings. We assign to the station 
certain qualities and characteristics. 
Mainly, we expect a certain typical 
behavior in any given situation. 

"The question of personality is ex- 
tremely important for every radio 
station and for every other product 
as well. Just as an example, blind- 
fold tests at our Institute have proven 
that most consumers are unable to 
differentiate among a number of 
cigarette or beer brands; and yet, 
each respondent affirms that he has 
his own favorite brand which he has 
selected for very definite differentials 
in taste and other qualities. 

'"By the same token," Dr. Koeves 
continues, "the moment you tune in 
on a certain radio station, you have 
already prepared yourself for a cer- 
ain type of experience. More than 
hat, if it is your favorite station, 
nconsciously you have already pro- 
ected a part of your own personality 
nto the action of tuning in. By the 
ere fact of preferring to listen to 
PRC or KILT or some other Hous- 
on station, you have marie a state- 
ent about yourself. 
"The whole listening experience, 
s well as the commercial effective- 
ess of a station, is thus deeplv in- 
uenced by what the personalitv of 
he station is felt to be by individuals 
nd by the community." 

In selecting its Houston sample. 
he Institute picked onlv regular 
adio listeners; to make sure that 
inswers would not be distorted — onlv 
hose who spent not more than 30% 
'f their time with KPRC. 



Media studies at the Institute re- 
veal that there is no such thing as 
a CBS or NBC listener, or Times 
reader, or Reader's Digest reader in 
the sense of a fan who only reads 
and dotes upon that station or that 
magazine. The Times reader reads 
other publications, the NBC listener 
or viewer is exposed to other net- 
works. However, if someone is se- 
lected for a depth survey who states 
a preference for a particular station 
then that person becomes a true 
part of the profile of that station's 
devotees. ^ 



SUN DRUG FIGHTS BACK 

(Cont'd from page 31) 

• Billfolds also soloed in a two- 
man spot, humorous-straight, opening 
with Dragnet-type lead, broken by 
cash register sound effect as spot 
switches to straight sell, pushing bill- 
folds for "boys at the office," imply- 
ing ideal gift for business associates 
or anyone you more or less have to 
give a gift to. 

While d.j.'s Henry DaBecco, Roy 
Elwell and Dave Scott were record- 
ing these spots, the Sun Drug and 
Top Value people were working out 
details of combating the supply prob- 
lem. All 46 stores would watch levels 
closely and be prepared to report 
each morning to assistant ad mana- 
ger Hume on their supply. If a sell- 
out was imminent at any store in the 
city, store supervisors with a surplus 
of that item would transfer it to the 
other store. This would not only 
avoid the customer annoyance of not 
finding the item stocked, but would 
enable an over-all. sell-out trend to 
remain just that, exhausting each 
stores supply uniformly. 

This transfer by store managers 
might work smoothly in the city, but 
stand-by personnel had to be avail- 
able to deliver items to outlying loca- 
tions. Similarly, stand-by items had 
to be selected to replace sell-out items, 
and the station had to be primed 
with copy points. 

With the stage set. the promotion 
broke Wednesday morning. 17 De- 
cember. Early in the game, the ad- 
vance planning paid off. B\ mid- 
morning Thursday. Hume's store 
checks in the city alone revealed a 
potential sell-out of the 1,200 snow 
brush kits by nightfall. In order to 
make it a reality, the supply at each 
store was checked and the transfer of 



I'ONSOK 



3 JANUARY 1959 



merchandise completed l>\ mid-after- 
noon of the same day. 

Simultaneously the station was 
given a cut-off on the kit commer- 
cials. Commercial for the new item — 
Westinghouse flash bulbs — bad to in- 
corporate the pocket radio, which 
shared the spot with the sold-out kit. 
Both were pitched "for people \<>u 
might have forgotten," and the first 
spot — live — was on the air b\ 10:30 
a.m. Friday morning. These spots 
were done live for the balance of the 
promotion. 

The pocket radio was the next item 
to hit the critical list. Friday morn- 
ing's store check revealed that tin; 
supply of 800 would very likely be 
exhausted by Saturday. The prob- 
lem here was one of re-supply. The 
weekend was devoted to moving ra- 
dios from the warehouse to all 46 
stores in proportions estimated about 
right to ride through the Tuesday 
close-out. 

By Sunday, all hands were helping 
with the re-supply operations. Not 
only company executives (see photo 
page 31 1 but station personnel — sales 
manager Bob Thompson, program 
and sales coordinator John Gibbs — 
were pitching in using their cars. 

When the smoke cleared with all 
items nearly or completely sold out, 
ad manager Harold Perry evaluated 
the results of the promotion. He sees 
its success as a major stimulus in 
maintaining the drug chain s volume 
percentage increase at a figure com- 
parable to market increases generally 
among competitors. 

This was the purpose of the pro- 
motion — to combat the year-end spurt 
that gives the discount house its big 
sales advantage. 

Heretofore. Sun Drug's radio ad- 
vertising had been confined to co-op 
arrangements with major pharma- 
ceutical bouses. Top Value's use of 
radio to creating awareness of its 
stamps and plugging member retail- 
ers, among them Sun Drug. 

But executives of both companies 
see in these strong results of item 
advertising on radio a new weapon 
against their two biggest threats: 

(1) underselling of discount houses, 

(2) credit in department store-. 
The fact that the two companies 

held their own volume-wise during 
the big season for both discount 
houses and department stores points 
to increased use of radio a< a waj of 
meeting their diverse competition. ^ 



57 



RADIO BASICS/JAN 



■/ 



Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



1958 1957 



49.2 
radio 
homes 





48.3 

radio 

homes 



51.1 50.2 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: A. C. Nielsen estimate, 1 Nov. each 
year, homes figures in millions. 



Radio set index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1958 



1957 



95,400,000 
37,200,000 



90,000,000 
35,000,000 



10,000,000* 10,000,000 



142,600,000 135,000,000 



Source: RAB, 1 July 1958. 1 July 1957. 
sets in working order. # No new information. 



Radio station index 





End of November 1958 






Stations CPs not New station 
on air on air requests 


New station* 
bids in hearing 


Am 
Fm 


1 3315 108 1 456 
571 115 34 

End of November 1957 


1 114 
29 


Am 
Fm 


1 3180 1 109 1 374 
I 537 51 1 32 


1 116 
1 9 


Source 


: FCC monthly reports, commercial stations. *Octoher each 


year. 



Radio set sales index 



Type 



Home 
Auto 



Total 



Oct. 1958 Oct. 1957 

743,368 923,849 

296,067 522,746 



1,039,435 1,446,595 8,326,662 11.126,312 



10 Months 10 Months 

1958 1957 



5,647,044 6,764,221 
2,679,618 4,362,091 



Source: Electronic Industries Assn. (formerly RETMA). Home flgares are retail 
sales, auto figures are factory production. 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 



Average daily hours in-home radio usage per home by day part 



October 1958 



Morning 

6-9 a.m. .34 hrs. or 20 min. Noon-3 p. in 

9 a.m. -Noon .42 hrs. or 25 min. 3-6 p.m. 

Total .75 hrs. or 45 min. Total 



Afternoon 

.37 hrs. or 22 min. 

.29 hrs. or 17 min. 

.65 hrs. or 39 min. 



Night 

6-9 p.m. .24 hrs. or 14 min 

9 p. in. -Mid. .15 hrs. or 9 min 

Total .39 hrs. or 23 min 



January-February 1957 



6 a.m. -Noon .85 hrs. or SI mirt. Noon-6 p.m. .77 hrs. or 46 min. 6 p.m.-6 a.m. .65 hrs. or 39 min 



The material above is based on Nielsen Radio Index, covers through Saturday. The totals for October 1958 are comparabl 
in-home listening only. Morning and afternoon figures are to the January-February 1957 figures except that the latte 
for Monday through Friday. Nighttime figures are for Sunday also covers post-midnight listening. Times are Eastern zon 



58 



SPONSOR • 3 JANUARY 195 



w* 



YOUR 

1959 

BUSINESS 

WILL BE 

UP 

because you'll get more of it if you read 
SPONSOR'S 12th annual 

FALL FACTS BASICS 

38 pages on Marketing with 15 pages of BASICS charts 
86 pages on Radio with 15 pages of BASICS charts 

78 pages on Television with 18 pages of BASICS charts 
17 pages on Film with four pages of BASICS charts 
Full copies of Fall Facts BASICS available for $1 



Reprints of the popular BASICS charts sections: 

1 TO 9 35 cents each 

10 TO 49 25 cents each 

50 TO 99 20 cents each 

100 TO 499 15 cents each 

500 TO 999 121^ cents each 

1,000 OR MORE 10 cents each 

Prices include postage 



16 pages on Marketing 

16 pages on Radio 

24 pages on Tv and Film 



For fast delivery, use the coupon below ; 



Readers' Service, SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Please send me the following reprints from Fall Facts BASICS. 

Check or cash enclosed Bill me 

Section Quantity desired Unit price Total amount 

Marketing 

Radio 

Television-Film _ 



Full copy of Fall Facts BASICS— $1 



Name 

Company 
Address 



ADVERTISERS 



In a step to reach a goal of 
$70 million in gross sales, the B. 
T. Babbitt Co. has gained control 
of Charles Antell. 

The joint agreement called for Bab- 
bitt to purchase the cash assets, trade 
names and trade marks of Charles 
Antell, Inc. and to purchase Charles 
Antell, Ltd. of Canada. 

A. N. LaBelle has been elected a 
v.p. of Babbitt, in charge of the new 
Antell division, which will manufac- 
ture and market Formula 9 Hair 
Conditioners, Liquid Shampoos, Hair 
Sprays and the newest products — 
Vita Yums and Vita Pops. 

Piel's Beer continues to cop the 
list of favorite tv commercials, 
according to the November, 1958 
listing by ARB. 



Other favorites: 


2) 


Maypo 


3) 


Hamms Beer 


4) 


Alka Seltzer 


5) 


Dodge 


6) 


Seven-Up 


7) 


Falstaff Beer 


8) 


Chesterfield 


9) 


Burgermeister Beer 


10) 


Ford 



Campaign : 

This week marks the launching of 
Gaines' new product, New Gaines 
Meal. The campaign includes 10- 
second I.D. tv spots — 14 per market 
per week, and commercials on the 
Ann Sothern, Zane Grey and Decem- 
ber Bride shows — CBS TV. A note 
about the commercial: It took 93 
dogs seven hours to be posed for a 
10-second scene. Agency : B&B. 

Strictly personnel: John Morris- 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



Brother it's cold out — 2.6° below freez- 
ing; Daring the weather: (1 to r) Bob 
Cheyne, sales promotion director, WHDH- 
TV, Boston; John Cohen, U. S. Weather 
Bureau; Sam Stein, of Boston's L Street 
Health Club; Bob Webber, Skin Diving 
Club and Anthony Galluccio, L Street, as 
part of WHDH-TV's Sea Hunt promotion 



It's a submarine! Philip Schaeffer, art 

director for WSAZ-TV, Huntington, W. Va., 
puts the finishing touches to the little "Y- 
IC-3" submarine that plans to make a trip 
under the South Pole, via that station's 
Spinach Playhouse. Submarine will also be 
displayed in leading department stores 
throughout the stations coverage area 





sey has joined Miles Products Divi- 
sion of Miles Labs as an assistant 
advertising manager . . . John Bull 
has resigned as executive v.p. of 
Sorenson Advertising, Chicago, to 
join Reynolds Metals Co. as a con- 
sultant in marketing and product de- 
velopment . . . William Caskey, ex- 
ecutive v.p. of WPEN, Philadelphia, 
has been elected to the board of di- 
rectors of the Sun Ray Drug Com- 
pany. 



AGENCIES 



Leo Burnett, Inc., Chicago-based 
agency just passing the $100 mil- 
lion mark in billings, realigned 
its top-level management last 
week. 

The changes: 

Leo Burnett continues as chair- 
man of the board and top officer of 
the agency; Richard Heath moves 
up to chairman of the executive com- 
mittee, responsible for agency man- 
agement. 

W. T. Young, Jr., an executive 
v.p., has been promoted to president. 




On location at the filming of Screen 
Gems' new syndicated series Stakeout, in 
Biscayne Bay, are Walter Matthau (1), 
star and Ben Colman, S.G.'s Eastern area - 
sales manager. Screen Gems combined 
three-day sales meeting with start of film- 
ing series based on Fla. Sheriffs Bureau , 



60 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



He will primarily coordinate the 
agency's creative output, marketing 
services and the work of the account 
staff. 

DeWitt O'Kieffe, a director and 
one of the founders of the company, 
has been elected senior v.p. ; Draper 
Daniels to executive v.p. in charge 
of creative services; Joseph Gree- 
ley, to executive v.p. heading mar- 
keting services; Philip Schaff, Jr., 
executive v.p. for administration and 
finance, also elected to the board of 
directors; and Edward Thiele, v.p. 
and director, named senior account 
supervisor. 

Another Chicago-based agency nam- 
ing top level appointments: 

Keyes, Madden & Jones, the 
39th ranking air agency ( See "Top 
50 Air Agencies" 27 December 
SPONSOR, page 27), has this new offi- 
cer set-up: 

Howard Jones, formerly execu- 
tive v.p., has been elected president; 
Harry Goldsmith, Jr., from senior 
v.p. to executive v.p.; Lee Marshall, 
to senior v.p.; and Dale Mehrhoff, 
to v.p. 



New members of the board of di- 
rectors include: Harry Goldsmith, 
Jr.; Lee Marshall and Fred Willson. 
Freeman Keyes continues as chair- 
man. 

Agency appointments: The Hertz 
Corp., for its truck and car leasing 
advertising, billing about $1 million, 
to Needham, Louis & Brorby. 
Campbell-Ewald, Hertz' agency since 
1928. continues to handle the car 
rental segment of the account and 
FCB, the plane renting . . . Lucky 
Tiger Manufacturing Co., Kansas 
City, to Gardner Advertising . . . 
Lake States Imports, Inc., distributor 
of the Renault in seven midwestern 
states, to Tilds & Cantz, Los An- 
geles. 



On the personnel front: Hugh 
Lucas and Kensinger Jones, both 
of the tv/radio departments, appoint- 
ed v.p.'s of Campbell-Ewald . . . Roy 
Stewart, to direct the media and re- 
search department of The Brady Co., 
Appleton, Wis. . . . Charles Ander- 
son, Jr., named writer-producer in 



the radio i\ department of Comstock 
& Co., Buffalo. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



Latest happenings at the \AB: 

• The AM Radio committee urged 
the Association to reaffirm its stand 
against liquor advertising on the 
air, during its winter meeting. 2-6 
February. The group also supported 
increasing the annual radio observ- 
ance to one month this year. 

• Its latest campaign, "Look for 
a room with a radio" has stations 
using about 29 spots per week to plug 
it, and formal pledges of support 
from two state broadcasting associa- 
tions — Tennessee and New Jersey. 

• NBC's Robert Sarnoff will re- 
ceive the Association's 1959 Keynote 
Award for Distinguished Service dur- 
ing its convention in Chicago, 16 
March. 

And here are some of the RAB's 
latest activities: 

• John Hardesty, v.p. and gen- 






At a kick-off luncheon celebrating the affiliation of the new 
Storz station KOMA, Oklahoma City with NBC are speaker Todd 
Storz, president of the Storz stations; Matthew J. Culligan, execu- 
tive v.p. of NBC and Mrs.. Todd Storz. Luncheon was to acquaint 
local merchants and agencies with station's new programing policy 



Another luncheon, another place: At the second annual joint 
pre-Christmas party sponsored by the Broadcast Advertising Club of 
Chicago and Chicago Unlimited: (1 to r) Paul McCleur, Geoffrey 
Wade Advertising; Holly Shively, EWR&R. secretary BAG; James 
Beach, ABC, president BAC; and Pete DeMet, sports packager 




To promote the show while New Yorkers were paperless, this 
100-year-old stage coach rode around city, wishing all a "Merry 
Christmas" from Dick Powell's Zone Grey Theatre (CBS TV* 



Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus hand out Christinas 
sponsored by the Scranton Times and its station 
kids from Lackawanna County Society for c 



gifts at a party 

WEJL, for 200 

rippled children 



I; 



\? 



I iljyb ifii 





eral manager, warned the ice cream 
manufacturers industry meeting in 
Chicago, that advertising can never 
reach maturity if non-experienced 
company executives continue to over- 
rule agency decisions. He attacked 
top-level management for an "ivory 
tower"" attitude when claiming exten- 
sive knowledge of advertising tactics. 
• Additional plans committee 
members include: F. H. Brinkley, 
of Ottaway Radio Stations; Benedict 
Gimbel. Jr.. WIP. Philadelphia; Tom 
Harrell. WSTP, Salisbury, N. C; Al- 
bert Johnson, KENS, San Antonio; 
Bob Eastman, of Robert E. Eastman 
station reps; and Russell Woodward 
of PGW. 



Meeting plans: The ninth annual 
conference of the Western States 
Advertising Agencies Associations 

will be held in Palm Springs 23-25 
April. Convention theme: New di- 
mensions in advertising. 

Kudos: These Los Angeles adver- 
tising executives received awards 
from the Advertising Council for 



their contributions to the national 
welfare: James Barnett, of Rexall 
Drug Co.; Arthur Bailey, of FC&B 
and Russell Eller, of Sunkist Grow- 
ers, Inc. . . . The Civil Service Com- 
mission's diamond anniversary award 
plaque, to Harold Fellows, NAB 
president. 

They were elected: 

At the Advertising Research Foun- 
dation. Ben Donaldson, consultant 
at Ford, chairman; Arno Johnson, 
v.p., JWT, vice-chairman; Frank 
Mansfield, director of marketing re- 
search, Sylvania, treasurer. 

At the Advertising Federation of 
America. Robert Lusk, president of 
B&B and Arthur Motley, president 
of Parade publications, to the board 
of directors. 



FILM 



Starting off the new year are two 
developments involving produc- 
tion of film programs in Europe 
for American tv. 



YOURS 



FOR INSPIRATION, KNOW-HOW 
AND NEW RADIO ELECTRONICS KNOWLEDGE 

Bigness has everything in the world to do with it when, 
each year, THE IRE NATIONAL CONVENTION and 
THE RADIO ENGINEERING SHOW is planned for you. 
Industries are only as big as you men who make them. 
And you have created a colossus that requires a Coliseum 
to show itself. 

Come to see, to hear and to learn. Whatever your special 
interests— equipment, component parts, instruments or pro- 
duction—these 800 exhibits representing 80% of your in- 
dustry's productive capacity are an INSPIRATION IN 
RADIO ELECTRONICS that will take you further along 
your personal path of progress. 




THE IRE NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Waldorf-Astoria Hotel 

<l, AND THE RADIO 

ENGINEERING SHOW 

Coliseum, New York City 



MARCH 
23 • 24 
25 • 26 



THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS 



1 East 79th Street, New York 21, 



Y. 



They are: 

• J. Arthur Rank's agreement with 
ITC to produce Interpol Calling, a 
39-episode international police se- 
ries budgeted at $1.4 million and 
scheduled to start filming in Febru- 
ary. 

• Gross-Krasne-Sillerman's shoot- 
ing of Fate, a dramatic anthology, 
partly in Europe under supervision of 
GKS foreign executive producer 
Donald Hyde. (Some episodes will 
also be made in Hollywood.) 



Sales report: Ziv's 1958 sales were 
32% ahead of 1957 volume, ac- 
cording to v.p. M. J. Rifkin. During 
the year, 25 account executives were 
added to Ziv's selling force, already 
regarded as the largest in the indus- 
try. 

Ziv sales included the following: 

• Network sales of Bat Masterson 
I NRG) and Rough Riders (ARC). 

• Syndication sale of Highway 
Patrol (4th year), Sea Hunt (1st and 
2nd year), Target, Dial 999, Mac- 
kenzie's Raiders and Bold Venture. 

More sales : NTA's Dream Package 
of 85 feature films reported sold to 
WMAL-TV, Washington, D. C.; 
KTVU, Oakland; WJAR-TV, Provi- 
dence; WHRF-TV, Rock Island; 
KONO-TV, San Antonio; WJRT-TV, 
Flint; WHO-TV, Des Moines; WMT- 
TV, Cedar Rapids; K ROC-TV, 
Rochester, Minn.; WINK-TV, Ft. 
Meyers; KOAM-TV, Pittsburg, Kan.; 
KFYR-TV, Rismarck, N. D., and 
KWRR-TV, Riverton. 






NBC stations' color: CNP's Cameo 
Theater is carried in color in six of 
the nation's ten largest tv markets. 
Five of these — New York, Chicago, 
Philadelphia, San Francisco and 
Washington — are NRC stations, plus 
WHDH-TV, Roston (ARC). 



NTA expansions: Henry D. Long 

will head the new San Francisco of| i 
fice of NTA . . . Samuel Gai 

named NTA foreign sales manager 



Promotion : Two promotions on be I 
half of Bat Masterson were ( 1 ) a five i 
city tour by star Gene Rarry in Ne 
York and New England and (2) 



62 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 195' 



preservation of art work by Oliver 
French on the series to Gene Barry. 

On the move: Arthur Spirt, 

former central division manager of 
1TC, has resigned. 

Commercials: the Trans American 
Advertising Agency Network com- 
petition gave its 1958 first place 
award to the Art Crayon Company's 
tv commercial produced by Fiore 
Films of Jersey City, N. J. 
Additional information: in re 
P&G's record-breaking buy of selec- 
tive programing in Canada (see 
FILMSCOPE, 13 December, 1958), 
the following facts are also of inter- 
est: 

1 l S. W. Caldwell Ltd., Canadian 
agency for P&G, recommended the 
switch from CBC network to spot 
programing. P&G is Canada's biggest 
advertiser. 

2 I Handling the transaction were 
Jim MacDonald and Rafe Engel of 
P&G, Ken Page and Owen Duffy of 
Caldwell's tv film sales, and Gordon 
Keeble of S. W. Caldwell Ltd. 



NETWORKS 



Maremont Muffler (Mar -Pro, 
Inc.) will be the first in its field 
to go network tv. 

It's buying into the Garroway and 
Paar shows, starting February, on a 
52-week basis. 



The trend of network tv pro- 
gram audiences continues to 
rise, according to TvB's January- 
November report. 

The first 11 months, 1958, show a 
7% increase in average evening pro- 
gram audiences and a 5% jump in 
average daytime audience. 

Here's a comparison of the growth 
in the number of homes reached for 
January through November of each 
year : 



1957 (55) 

1958 (61) 



8.2 
7.9 



2,983 
3.123 



AVG. EVENING 


RATING 


HOMES 


PROGRAM (NO.) 


(psb) 


(ADD 000) 


1955 (133) 


21.1% 


5,939 


1956 (136) 


21.6 


6,957 


1957 (123) 


22.3 


8,282 


1958 (124) 


21.9 


8,838 


AVG. WEEKDAY 






DAYTIME PROGRAM 




1955 146) 


8.1% 


2,275 


1950 (50) 


8.4 


2,711 



New network business and re- 
newals: for ABC TV, Block Drug 
Co. (SSC&Bl into American Band- 
stand; Boyle-Midway (JWT), for 
Colt .45 and Frito Co. (DFS), for 
The Lone Ranger . . . Mutual reports 
that 35% of its 1958 roster of clients 
have renewed network contracts for 
this year, with 52-week campaigns 
ordered by Colgate, Ex-Lax and Hud- 
son Vitamin Corp. . . . For CBS TV, 
The Texan, renewed by Brown & 
Williamson for the final 13 weeks of 
its 39- week run. 

Network ideas: NBC Radio is 

sending out a ball-and-cup game to 
agencies and advertisers as part of its 
five-week campaign to promote its 
"Engineered Circulation" con- 
cept. The device, a cup on a stick 
and a wooden ball attached to a 
string, illustrates the campaign slo- 
gan — "the trick is in the timing." 

Four mailing pieces to the client- 
agency list preceded the game. 

Programing note: Jackie Glea- 

son finished his half-hour weekly se- 
ries on CBS TV for Lever and 

Pharmaceuticals last week, with plans, 
instead, to do four specials on the 
network during the 1959-1960 season. 

Thisa 'n' data: Tv Guide quotes 
James Hagerty, White House press 
secretary, as saying he is against any 
Congressional legislation that would 
compel radio and tv networks to yield 
time for live broadcasts any time the 
White House requests it, "except, of 
course, in time of national emer- 
gency." 



RADIO STATIONS 



All radio and tv in 1957, ac- 
cording to FCC data just released, 
did $1.5 billion, 6.1% over 1956. 

Here are some highlights from the 
FCC's radio revenue report or 1957: 
ALL REVENUE FROM RADIO: 
$517.9 million; 5.2% over 1956. 
NATIONAL NETWORKS: $51.7 mil- 
lion; 6.7% over 1956; operated at a 
loss. 

NATIONAL AND REGIONAL NET- 
WORKS PLUS 21 O&O STATIONS: 
$73.4 million; 4.7% over 1956; no 
profit since expense equalled income. 



SELL 




D ; 1 ,', I I .' [ HTTT7 




Alabama's ONLY fulltime 100% Negro 
station • In Birmingham — the 31st 
market — 42% Negro • Top-rated 
Negro station consistently by Pulse- 
Hooper • The BEST way to the 
260,000 Negroes of the Birmingham 
Metropolitan Area. 



SELL 




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on WOK J 

of SHREVEPORT 
onKOKA 

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WITH 

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IN WISCONSIN 

• The area with the HIGHEST 
industrial weekly wage in the 
state. (U.S. Employment Bu- 
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• Serving the RICHEST farm 
counties in the Midwest with 
over 54,000 farm families. 

• Serving the giant land of 3 A 
million people and two mil- 
lion cows. 

IMF All-TV Eau claire 

VVLHU" I V Wisconsin 
See your Hollingbery Man 
in Minneapolis, see Bill Hurley 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



63 



Hoodoo Ski Area in Oregon 



Nearly }/\ of Oregon's 
buying families watch 

KVAL-TV 

KPIC-TV 



The only clear picture in the 
Eugene-Springfield-Roseburg 
market is on KVAL-KPIC. One 
order to your Hollingberry man 
or Art Moore and Associates 
(Portland-Seattle) covers both 
stations. 



KVAL-TV Fugene 
NBC Affiliate Channel 



E 



v 



KPIC-TV Roseburg • Channel 4 

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IMPACT! 




PROVED 3 WAYS 
AMERICA'S BEST TV BUY 



AM, May 7958 — highest rated station in 
America in markets of three or more 
stations. 

Telepu/se 1957 Year-End Review — highest 
rated station in America in markets of 
three or more stations for the entire 
year of (957. 

Telepu/se, May 7958 — first in the market 
91.3% of rated quarter-hours. 



HB0D-H1T 



CBS Television Networl • Channel 4 • El Paso. Tela! 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 

Dcrrance D. Roderick Pres.; Val Lawrence, V.-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



NATIONAL SPOT: $169.5 million; 
16.5% higher than 1956. 
LOCAL SPOT: $316.5 million; 6.3% 
over 1957. 

STATIONS OTHER THAN O&O's: 
3,143 reported $444.4 million; 8.3% 
above 1956. Profits of these amounted 
to $54.6 million; 11.9% above 1956. 
On the other side of the ledger there 
were 959 stations, 31.1% of all sta- 
tions, who reported they lost money 
in 1957. In 1956 the ratio of losing 
stations was 29.3%. (See 6 Septem- 
ber 1958 sponsor, page 67, for FCC's 
1957 financial data.) 

Ideas at work: 

• Gone abankin': To accommo- 
date the Erie Union Bank's wish for 
Christmas music in their lobby, 
WICU, Erie, supplied the records — 
along with news, commercials a7id the 
whole station operation. Station also 
interviewed bankers and officials, and 
plugged the bank's Christmas Club — - 
while the bank picked up the bill. 

• WlSN, Milwaukee, came up 
with a "hands down" winner in their 
contest offering $100 to the person 
writing the station's call letters the 
most times on a post card. The win- 
ning number: 11,839 WISN's. 

• For salesmen only: Jack Pyle, 
d.j. on WIP, Philadelphia, found out 
that his daily noon-hours program 
doesn't attract an all-lady audience 
only. He suggested that traveling 
salesme7i listening to him, send in 
money for a private salesmen's din- 
ner — and 450 traveling salesmen 
showed up. 

• WPTR, Albany-Schenectady- 
Troy, is airing Christmas carol 
chimes of every church in Tri-City 
area, which the station recorded. Dif- 
ferent chhnes are played between 
each popular music record. 

Thisa'n'data: WICE, Providence, 
has set up a full-time merchandising 
and sales protnotion department, 
headed by John Murray, Jr. The de- 
partment plans include direct mailing 
for the sponsor and personal appear- 
ances of station's stars . . • Consult- 
ant appointed: Lawrence B. Tay- 
lor, Inc., Burlingame, Cal., has es- 
tablished a broadcasting division to 
service radio and tv station manage- 
ment. J. G. Paltridge becomes direc- 
tor of this consulting division. 

They were awarded: Bud Clark, 
newscaster on WIL, St. Louis, pre- 



sented with the Missouri Associated 
Press News Coverage Award . . .. 
KSFO, San Francisco, for its blood 
appeal, honored by the Fraternal Or- 
der of Eagles . . . Dewey Compton, 
farm director of KTRH & KTRK- 
TV, Houston, winner of the Ameri- 
can Farm Bureau Federation's award 
for reporting . . . WKAP, Allentown, 
Pa., won the Meritorious Service 
Award for 4-H at the annual banquet 
of the Lehigh County Agricultural 
Extension Service. 

Anniversary note: WBCB, Levit- 
town, Pa., celebrated its first birth- 
day with an open house party that in- 
cluded remote broadcasts, fashion 
and variety shows and dancing for 
the 8,000 guests. 

Station staffers : Robert Kindred, 

appointed general manager of KJBS r 
San Francisco . . . Eddie Newman, 
to program director of WDAS, Phila- 
delphia . . . Warren Blackmon, to 
the executive staff at WVCG, Coral 
Gables . . . James Pigg, named farm 
director at WBAP, Ft. Worth . . . 
Jack Kroeck, farm director, WDAF, 
Kansas City . . . Arnold Peterson, 
farm service director, WOW, Omaha 
. . . Thomas Carr, to director of 
public relations at WBAL, Baltimore 
. . . George Pardon, to the sales 
staff at KFMB, San Diego, as account 
executive. 



RESEARCH 



Pulse's Dr. Sidney Roslow told 
the Washington Ad Club this 
week that a single audit bureau 
for tv would be disastrous. 

His basic argument: Tv is a dy- 
namic medium and should be meas- 
ured by as ma7iy means as possible. 
Look at what has happened to the 
newspapers. They've confined them- 
selves to a single yardstick, the ABC 
Population and income has gone up 
at a fast rate but the total number 
of newspapers have declined. 

Noted Dr. Roslow : The more head 
and mind counting — that is, competi- 
tive research — the better it is for a 
medium. 

M. A. Wallach Research, Inc., has 

its interviewers using IBM Port-a- 
Punches to create punched research 
cards while an interview is being 
conducted. 



64 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



Designed for on-the-spot punching, 
it is being used by the company's 
new tv group — T.P.I. Ratings, Inc. 
Strictly personnel : Ernest Fan- 
ning, named to the newly created 
post of executive assistant to the gen- 
eral manager for diary reports, and 
Stephen Salonites, to the New York 
sales staff of the ARB . . . Richard 
Wolden, to the client service staff 
of the Menlo Park, Cal., branch of 
Nielsen . . . Sidney Rowland, to re- 
search associate at Special Studies, 
Inc. 



TV STATIONS 



The Empire State Building, which 
transmits from its tower all seven 
New York tv stations, can make 
this boast: 

It's the first skyscraper to buy tv 
to advertise itself. Specifically, the 
thing it's selling is more tourism for 
its observatories. 

WRCA TV has the business— 20- 
second spots. 

Promotion and merchandising 
note: Top winners of NBC TV's 
$25,500 daytime program promotion 
contest were Dean Faulkner, pro- 
motion manager of KOA-TV, Denver, 
and Peggy Cooper, of WITN, Wash- 
ington, N. C. Other winners: Ar- 
thur Garland, WRGB, Schenec- 
tady; John Hurlbut, WFBM-TV, 
Indianapolis; Frank Reynolds, 
KFSD-TV, San Diego; Kirt Harris, 
KPRC, Houston, and Dick Paul, 
WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre. 



ea Ideas at work : 

• WTAE, Pittsburgh, tied in with 
Santa in multiple ways; via special 
ID slide, 17-foot cutout on roof of 
studio-offices, Christmas card tying 
in with station's ad-promotion theme: 
Take TAE and See". 

• KTTS-TV, Springfield. Mo. 
et' 'conducted a "Why I like Gunsmoke" 
ink contest in conjunction with the 6 

December Tv Guide cover story on 
James Arness. Prize to the best an- 
swerer: An autographed dye transfer 
of the magazine's cover. 

Construction note: WXYZ-TV, 

Detroit's new tower, a tall 1.073 feet, 
is now completed, and ready to be- 
. .-'in transmitting the station's pro- 
grams. The tower is nearly twice as 
tall as Detroit's tallest skyscraper. 



Thisa 'n' data: Arthur C. Niel- 
sen, president of A. C. Nielsen, and 
sports editor John Carmichael dis- 
cussed ratings on WBKB, Chicago's 
V.I. P. show . . . Anniversary note: 
WDSU-TV, New Orleans, celebrated 
its 10th year by telecasting a "birth- 
day party" in the form of an original 
musical comedy. 

Kudos: WTAE, Pittsburgh, re- 
ceived its first public service award 
from the Boy Scouts of America for 
its hour-long This Is Exploring show 
. . . John Wilner, v.p. and director 
of engineering for radio and tv sta- 
tions of the Hearst Corp., selected 
for the first engineering award given 
by the NAB. 

New promotions at the Noe En- 
terprises (KNOE-AM & TV, Mon- 
roe, La.. WNOE, New Orleans) : Paul 
Goldman, to executive v.p. and gen- 
eral manager; Ray Boyd, v.p. and 
director of engineering; Harry Ar- 
thur, to v.p. and program director; 
Jack Ansell, Jr., v.p. heading sales 
and promotion ; Ansel Smith, v.p. 
and operations manager, and Mac 
Ward, v.p. and news director of the 
tv station; Edd Routt, named v.p. 
and general manager of the Monroe 
radio station. 

More personnel news: James E. 
Szabo, named sales manager for 
WABC-TV, New York . . . Kenneth 
Hanni, to assistant to the president 
at Intermountain Broadcasting and 
Tv Corp. . . . Merrill Panitt, pro- 
moted to editor of Tv Guide . . . 
Herbert Buck, Jr., also becomes 
program director of WCTV. Tallahas- 
see, Fla. . . . Edward Marsett, to 
the staff of KFMB-TV, San Diego, as 
account executive . . . Vernon Gold- 
smith, to the press information de- 
partment at WNEW-TV, New York. 

Add personnel appointments: 
Neal Edwards, station manager of 
KXAB-TY. Aberdeen. S. D. . . . 
Murray Tesser, assistant manager, 
WHNY-TV. Springfield-Holyoke . . . 
Howard Coleman, to administra- 
tive assistant to the president, Gross 
Telecasting. Inc. . . . Kenneth 
Wright, to account executive and 
Don Harris, to assistant program 
director. WPTA. Ft. Wayne . . . 
Taylor Lumpkin, to the sales de- 
partment. WSB-TV, Atlanta. ^ 



WALL STREET 

( Cont'd from page 2 ( ) i 

handed in planning, they found it 
hard work to handle the 600-700 
callers who accepted the invitation 
the first afternoon and evening. Bache 
representatives asked callers to gi\e 
their names and addresses and the 
stocks in which they were interested. 
A follow-up call was made on each the 
next day and this program has been 
very valuable in securing new cus- 
tomers and their business. 

One stumbling block often men- 
tioned in discussions of the continued 
use of these spot radio promotions is 
the necessity of keeping the regular 
personnel in the office to work nights. 
"The staff cant be asked to work on 
an emergency basis forever." "It is 
impossible to use outside help or a 
service to answer phone calls — it 
takes specialists to give the proper 
answers." These are typical tf com- 
ments received : 

Eastman Dillon, are definitely in- 
terested in continuing on a perma- 
nent basis, and will probably try a 
13- or 26-week schedule as a starter. 

John Ellis, who heads sales for 
Eastman Dillon, reports that since 
their advertising in the past has been 
mainly r in newspapers, they will have 
to go slow in learning how to use 
radio. He mentioned the different 
response it brought — and that it had 
occurred under unusual circum- 
stances. Ellis feels that the good will 
generated by his emergency program 
was well worth the cost, quite apart 
from any more tangible value. He 
cited the reputation his firm has as 
being one of the most aggressive in 
the business, and considers that the 
promotion has reinforced that repu- 
tation still further. 

As Ellis sees it, his problem now 
is how to give listeners a sufficiently 
strong incentive to respond as vigor- 
ousl\ as the) did during the duration 
of strike. 

In the past, Eastman Dillon news- 
paper advertising lias had the job 
of filling in and mailing coupons a«k- 
inii lor information. Now, il radio 
is employed and the response is like- 
l\ to he instantaneous, new factors 
enter in. and the firm will have to 
feel out the best wa\ to work with 
them. \\ atchers are confident it won t 
be a long wait in the majorit) ol 
cases. ^ 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



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66 




Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Joseph Stamler has been appointed v.p. 
of ABC and general manager of WABC-TV, 
New York. He has been with the flagship 
station for the past six years, spending his 
first three years as an account executive 
and then promoted to sales manager. Prior 
to joining WABC-TV, Stamler served as 
an account executive for WMGM, New 
York for two years, and before this, as 
sales manager of WNDR, Syracuse. He spent four years in the Air 
Force during W.W. II. Stamler is a graduate of Syracuse University. 

Cordon Hellmann has been named direc- 
tor of sales development of Transcontinent 
Tv Corp. He formerly spent three and one- 
half years as director of sales promotion at 
TvB. Prior to this, Hellmann was director 
of sales presentations at CBS TV for five 
years. His background also includes adver- 
tising and promotion experience with K&E 
and ABC TV. In W.W. II, he served in 
the Pacific as a naval aviator. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins 
University. Hellmann will operate out of TTC's New York office. 

Murray C. Thomas has been elected v.p. 
in charge of media at Anderson & Cairns, 
Inc. He has been with A&C since 1952 
following his association with D-F-S as 
manager of print media. Thomas also 
served as media director for Paris & Peart 
and as manager of market analysis for the 
Spool Cotton Co. He is a past president of 
the Media Buyers' Association. Other pro- 
motions at A&C: Everett Hencke, to v.p. heading art; Sherman 
Rogers, v.p. heading copy; Edmund Ridley, v.p. of agency relations. 

William H. Crumbles was recently ap- 
pointed vice president of RKO Teleradio 
Pictures, Inc. He will handle special assign- 
ments for RKO o&o radio/tv stations 
throughout the country. Beginning his 
radio career with WRUF, Gainesville while 
a student at the University of Florida, 
Grumbles moved after graduation to 
WJHP, Jacksonville. Subsequent to W.W. 
II. he joined WGCM, Gulfport and in 1947 became associated with 
WHQB, Memphis. He is vice president of the AFA of Memphis 






SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



"V ' ■ » Xi" 3^3 


IR FUTUI 


~^m£s& 



':*•"*? , . L* 



— 



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YOUR FUTURE IS GREAT IN A GROWING AMERICA 






SWsiK*^T _*;♦* 



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THE CITY THAT DIDN'T EXIST A MONTH AGO 



Every 30 days the U. S. adds as many new Americans as 
live in Norfolk, Va.— creating brand-new wants and 
needs which must be satisfied. 

What does this mean to you? It means greater opportu- 
nities than ever before — in all fields. Home construction 
is expected to double by 1975. Power companies plan to 
increase output 250 f f in the next 20 years to provide 
the power for scores of new labor-saving devices. Cloth- 
ing suppliers predict a one-third increase in 7 years. 

With 11,000 new citizen-consumers born every day, 
there's a new wave of opportunity coming. 

7 BIG REASONS FOR CONFIDENCE IN AMERICA'S FUTURE 

1. More people . . . Four million babies yearly. U. S. popula- 
tion has doubled in last 50 years! And our prosperity 
curve has always followed our population curve. 

2. More jobs . . . Though employment in some areas has fallen 
off, there are 15 million more jobs than in 1939— and there 
will be 22 million move in 1975 than today. 

3. More income . . . Family income after taxes is at an all- 
time high of $5300 -is expected to pass $7000 by 1975. 



4. More production . . . U. S. production doubles every 20 
years. We will require millions more people to make, sell 
and distribute our products. 

5. More savings . . . Individual savings are at highest level 
ever— $340 billion— a record amount available for spend- 
ing. 

6. More research . . . $10 billion spent each year will pay off 
in more jobs, better living, whole new industries. 

7. More needs ... In the next few years we will need $500 
billion worth of schools, highways, homes, durable equip- 
ment. Meeting these needs will create new opportunities 
for everyone. 

Add them up and you have the makings of another big up- 
swing. Wise planners, builders and buyers will act now to 
get ready for it. 



FREE! Send for this new 24-page illus- 
trated booklet, "Your Great Future in a 
Growing America." Every American 
should know these facts. Drop a card to- 
day to: Advertising Council, Box 10, 
Midtown Station, New York 18, X. Y. 

(This space contributed as a public service by this magazine.) 




SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 



07 



SPONSOR 



Congratulations to RAB 

Last month the Radio Advertising Bureau came up with 
two important radio "firsts" — the first spot radio dollar fig- 
ures ever compiled by an industry trade association, and the 
first broadcast media expenditures ever released by a broad- 
cast media source on a "net" rather than a "gross" basis. 

For both these achievements RAB deserves the thanks and 
appreciation of the entire radio industry. 

RAB's list of 51 top radio spot advertisers (with com- 
mendable caution RAB insists that they are not necessarily 
the top 51) was carried in the 27 December sponsor. 

Its industry-by-industry breakdown, and a discussion of 
what these RAB figures mean, appears on page 32 of this 
issue. To Kevin Sweeney and his RAB staff, sponsor extends 
its heartiest congratulations for a much-needed and difficult 
job well done. 

The RAB research cannot fail to impress media men, ac- 
count executives and advertising managers who are planning 
1959 campaigns, and thus will do much to increase the sales 
power behind radio spot. 

The fact that the figures were difficult to compile, and esti- 
mate exactly reflects great credit also on RAB. Its research 
department was forced to set up new and special machinery 
for collecting and evaluating time-sale information and spe- 
cial formulas for breaking the expenditures down to a net 
rather than gross basis. 

In releasing its figures, RAB was at pains to point out that 
they were based on a "large but not complete sample of the 
industry," and, for this reason, they may omit "certain siz- 
able accounts, particularly large regionals." 

But the fact is, that RAB has provided the industry, for 
the first time in history, with a clear-cut picture of the kind 
of national advertisers who are selling through spot radio, 
and impressive figures on the amounts they are spending. It 
is a truly fine accomplishment. 



A 




"v./' 



this we FIGHT FOR: More light of every 
kind on the sales power of radio spot. This 
tremendously valuable branch of air media 
deserves more billings than it has been receiv- 
ing. It must not hide its light under a bushel. 



68 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Saint: Admen, publicists and public 
relations men have been given a patron 
saint to look after them — St. Ber- 
nardino of Siena. And high time, too! 

Quote: By Grey Advertising's Gene 
Accas at RTES meeting — "Hypoed 
ratings are a station's falsies; they put 
up a strong front with no support." 

Definitions: Here's the final install- 
ment of that studio lexicon by Dee 
Vincent of KONO-TV, San Antonio— 
'"Ready One" — This is the signal for 
Camera Two to be put on the air. 
u Go to black" — The coffee break has 
gotten out of hand, there is no one in 
the control room and we're off the air. 
Boom — Something the general man- 
ager has a tendency to lower right 
after we have gone to black. (Some- 
times mistakenly referred to as a piece 
of studio equipment.) 
"Standby" — Command to call attention 
of crew to watch the academy leader 
on the "On-the-air" monitor, usually 
during a live cut-in. 

Don't Mix! Gloria Brown, Cleveland 
KYW and KYW-TV's Gal on The Go, 
is currently plugging a cake frosting 
mix and a reducing product named re- 
spectively "Swel" and "Twill." Her 
big worry: that she might one day fluff 
by talking about the qualities of 
"Swill." 

Nature story: KENS-TV, in sunny 
San Antonio where snow comes hardly 
ever, was deluged by phone calls 
during the telecast of a pro football 
game played in a Chicago snowstorm. 
San Antonians complained about the 
"snow" on their tv screens. 

Spirit: lust to prove this is the season 
of "good will to all men," in New York 
City, ABC's Ollie Treyz won NBC's 
stereo hi-fi prize at the RTES Christ- 
mas party, while out in St. Louis, 
KTV1 (an ABC TV affil) salesman 
Dick Kimball won the prize given by 
Manager Bob Hyland of KMOX (CBS) I 
of a two-week vacation in Hawaii. 0h\ 
well, at least in the KMOX case they're^ 
getting a competitive salesman out of 
town. 

Trend? ABC TV has auditioned as 
possible daytime entry an "indoor 
Western." Unfair to us horses! 



SPONSOR 



3 JANUARY 1959 




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Find out today how "Shopper-Topper" can move 
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The Shopper-Topper* Merchandising Plan guarantees: 

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lO JANUARY 19S9 
20. ■ a copy • S3 ji year 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




WESTERNS 
STILL TOP THE 
RATINGS 

Mid -season television 
survey reveals seven 
fall starters have died. 
Other show -witches 
mark first 13 weeks 

Page 31 

The man behind 
Bab-O's new 
market plans 

Page 34 

Bardahl 

merchandises to 
its competitors 

Page 38 

What stations 
think of 42 
rep services 

Page 40 



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I If one of these series isn't sailing for you, you're missing the boat! California national productions, inc. 

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NBC TELEVISION films a division OF 

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DEEP 
STUFF 



© Vol. 13, No. 2 



lO January 1959 



SPfl eyf c& #Tl W9 
m ^tan^ H^H ^Hidiy ^mrnm^ ■ ^Wl 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO AOVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Net tv: first i3 weeks are the hardest 

31 Some casualties, substitutions and shifts mark the first lap of 58-59 
season as sponsors eye ratings... Westerns still ride high and handsome 

Bab-o's Lachner plans market by market 

34 ln an exclusive sponsor interview, B. T. Babbitt's president, Marshall S. 
Lachner, explains the new marketing policies of 123-year old firm 

How Bardahl battles the oil giants 

36 Here's how the oil additive won 85% distribution, $2,225,000 volume 
in N.Y. merchandising a tv schedule to the oil companies' own outlets 

Why 13 auto dealers laugh at the slump 

38 The industry may be off 20%, but an auto chain used saturation radio 
to gain a 10-12% sales increase in Greater Cleveland, Little Rock, Miami 

Holidays slow up Creen Bay's tv test 

39 With chains and supermarkets featuring seasonal items for Xmas and 
New Years, sales of Parti-Day toppings are off, but January looks brighter 

What stations want in services 

40 218 radio/tv stations rank 42 services now performed by their national 
representative, add candid comments to answers in sponsor's new survey 

Schwerin tests the "hybrid" commercial 

43 Research in 1958 shows that "hybrid" commercials were more effective 
than those commercials using either live action or animation alone 



sponsor asks: What constitutes good radio sound? 

34 As music-news format controversy comes to a head, three station men 
describe the programing techniques they have found most successful 



FEATURES 

57 Film-Scope 

25 49th and Madison 

64 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
64 Picture Wrap-Up 
62 Radio Results 
lO Sponsor Backstage 
60 Sponsor Hears 



17 Sponsor-Scope 

76 Sponsor Speaks 

44 Spot Buys 

52 Telepulse 

76 Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 
74 Tv and Radio Newsmaker; 
59 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 
Senior Editors 

W. F. Miksch 

Jane Pinkerton 
Harold Hazelton 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Western Editor (Los. Angeles) 

Marjorie Ann Thomas 
Film Editor 
Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 
Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Editor 
'"a Csida 
Art Editor 
Mauiy Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Vlskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

Sales Manager 
James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 
Sandra Lee Oncay, Asit. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Manager 

Dorris Bowers 

George Becker 

Laura Datre 

Priscilla Hoffman 

Jessie Ritter 

Member of Business Publication*. ^^^Tl 

Audit of Circulations Inc. LjJjB. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.| 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St.l 
(49th G- Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: superior 7-9863.1 
Birmingham Office: Town House. Birmingham) 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087B 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-80891 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 111 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.Al 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St.T 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Publishei I 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered * 
2nd class matter on 29 January 1948 at the Balti 
"""p lostoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc 



*V* 





-/^ 



t**H 



*Sfc 



t 1 *, 



mportant scoop at Telestudios! in the monitor: a swmt m mum 

j 'take'. 9 In TELESTUDIOS' control room: astute N. W. Ayer executives take all the second looks they 
ike to assure top quality results for their quality- conscious client. It's all done in minutes while the 
rew stands by to shoot another "take" That's because it's done with "tape" at TELESTUDIOS, playing 

\ \ack instantly, on command. And at TELESTUDIOS you also command 13,000 square feet of videotape 

!\ \lant.. . 4 complete broadcast camera chains . . .new 70-position dimmer board.. . top notch technical 
I )faff. All this plus custom service treatment.. . top management personalized treatment. That's why 
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1 ostyou get with" tape" at TELESTUDIOS. That's the scoop— "tape" at NTA's TELE STUDIO S. 
1481 Broadway, New York, N. Y, LOngacre 3-6333 



WOR RADIO 
STUDY ADDS 
ANEW 
DIMENSION 
TO COST- 
PER-IOOO 




p 

r 
r 

h 



her 

shopping 

habits 




i 




Advertisers have always been aware of 
the shortcomings of buying radio on a 
strictly cost-per-1000 basis. Everyone 
realizes that the lowest cost-per-1000 does 
not necessarily produce the greatest sales 
results for the dollars invested. Why? 
WOR's new study "The New York House- 
wife" gives the first statistical evidence. 

The study, nearly a year in the making, 



analyzes the housewife audience of 8 major 
New York radio stations. Although t 
housewife may listen to many stations,, 



„, 



she is a loyal listener to some and not to 



others; she is more personally -interested 



in some; she is more receptive to some, 



she is more attentive to some and she 



relies on one more than another. The way 



she listens to a station is bound to affec 



her response to its advertising. 

SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 19J 



There's a big difference in the type of housewife listener each Neiv York station 
delivers. For example, in comparison with a top-rated music/news independent, 



WOR RADIO DELIVERS 




54% 



MORE LOYAL LISTENERS 

MORE PERSONALLY - 
INTERESTED LISTENERS 



4 1 % MORE RECEPTIVE LISTENERS 



78% 



MORE ATTENTIVE LISTENERS 



PER 
1000 

HOUSEWIVES 
REACHED 



/ 






WOR's study also sheds new light on the housewife's shopping habits . . . 

• HOW MUCH SHE SPENDS AND WHEN SHE SHOPS 

• HER EXPOSURE TO RADIO AND NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING 
PRIOR TO SHOPPING 

• THE LENGTH OF TIME BETWEEN ADVERTISING EXPOSURE 
AND SHOPPING 

. . . important information that demonstrates why advertisers should make radio 
their primary choice. Ask your WOR RADIO representative for your copy of 
"THE NEW YORK HOUSEWIFE " study. 



•hi i 



WOR RADIO 710 






fm 98.7 



A Division of 



HKO 



Te I eradio Pictures. Inc. 



Serving more advertisers than any other station i)i New York 



SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



BUT RULES 

ARE MADE 

TO BE BROKEN! 



by 

Bert Ferguson 

Exec. Vice-President 

WDIA 



Every rule has an exception — 
even the one that says there's no 
such thing as a sure thing! Because, 
here is a sure thing: One medium 
alone — Memphis' Radio Station 
WDIA — sells the biggest market of 
its kind in the entire country ! 
The 1,237,686 Negroes in WDIA's 
listening pattern! 

Only 50,000 watt station in this 
area — America's only 50,000 watt 
Negro station — WDIA reaches al- 
most 10% of the nation's total 
Negro population, with total earn- 
ings last year of $616,294,100! 




FIRST 


IN LISTENERSHIP 


Negroes make up over 40% of the 
Memphis market! And before it 
buys, this big buying audience 
listens — to WDIA! In the March- 
April 1958 Nielsen Station Index, 
Sunday through Saturday, WDIA 
totaled up an overwhelming 52% 
more rating points than the next- 
ranking station: 


Station 


Total Rating 
Points 


WDIA 




528.2 


Sta. B 




337.1 


Sta. C 




284.1 


Sta. D 




278.8 


Sta. E 




137.4 


Sta. F 




101.3 


Sta. G 




74.1 



WDIA's year-round national ad- 
vertisers include: COLGATE PALM- 
OLIVE COMPANY . . . PURE OIL 
. . . CONTINENTAL BAKING 
COMPANY . . . GENERAL MO- 
TORS . . . LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO COMPANY. 

It's a fact! When selling the 
Memphis Negro market, you've got 
a sure thing with WDIA! Why not 
drop us a line today? Let us tell 
you about WDIA's proof of per- 
formance in your own line! 

WDIA Is Represented Nationally 
By John E. Pearson Company 

ECMONT SONDERLINC, President 
ARCHIE S. CRINALDS, JR., Sales Manager 










NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This tveek veteran broadcast representative Ed Petry named 
a new president to his 27-year-old firm. The move reveals a 
"grass roots' 1 '' approach as increased emphasis on spot radio 
and tv makes de-centralization of selling, increasing "must.''' 

The newsmaker: Fift\-four year old Edward Everett 
Voynow riding herd on Petry 's branch offices since he set the first 
ones up in 1932, has the local pulse of the organization at his finger- 
tips. This week he was moved up to president of the company from 
his executive v.p. post, with Petry assuming chairmanship of the 
board. 

Petry will also head up a newly-formed committee — a sounding 
board for ideas from the field. They will come from the organiza- 
tion's 63 salesmen by way of "plans boards" for radio and television, 
also just creative. 

The tv board will be headed by 
Martin L. Nierman, formerly v.p. 
of television, who moves up to fill 
Voynow's vacated executive vice- 
presidency. V.p. Bill Maillefert will 
head the radio board. 

A look at Petry 's expansion in 
the last two years (when it passed 
the quarter-century mark) shows 
why a closer link to every branch 
is needed. The number of offices 
increased from seven to nine cities, 
its radio station list from 18 to 27, 
tv list from 28 to 30. 

Behind the Voynow appointment 
is a long career that had a lot to do with lifting radio out of a crystal 
set fad and making it an advertising reality. In 1927, Voynow left 
his post of promotion manager for King Features Syndicate to join 
National Radio Advertising. That's when he got the idea of putting 
radio programs on phonograph records. 

The biggest stumbling block, he recalls: getting stations to invest 
in turntable equipment to play the shows. As soon as they got in line 
he proceeded to sell the idea of recorded half-hour dramas to the 
Maytag Washing Machine Co. When that idea caught, Voynow 
pushed the advantage to work out a "second 159c commission ' for 
sales representatives. 

It was Voynow who opened Ed Petry s Chicago and Detroit offices 
when Petry decided to start a representative firm in 1932. In 1951, 
he was elected executive v.p. Now, as president of the firm, he'll con- 
tinue to headquarter in Chicago, where he has headed things up since 
the very beginning of Edward Petry & Co. ^ 




Edward Everett Voynow 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 




I SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



Way out 
Front! 



?WPTF 





WPTF is way out front with lis- 
teners both at home (Metropolitan 
Raleigh) and throughout its 32- 
County Area Pulse. 70 out of 72 
quarter hours at home . . . and every 
single quarter hour throughout the 
area! And here's the share of audi- 
ence story: 

Metropolitan Raleigh (Wake County) 

WPTF .... 31.4% 

"B" 24 

"C" 16.7 

"D" 9 

"E" 5.3 

All Others. . 8 



35% 



Share of Audience 

1958 

Area Pulse 32 Counties 



12.7% 




6.7% 5.7% 



WPTF Local 2nd Sta. 3rd Sta. 
Network 







: 




Time buyers 
at work 







Waif Moran, Donahue & Coe, Inc., New York, feels that buyers 
should constantly keep in mind the fact that it is their job to sell a 
given product effectively. "Low costs per thousand and ratings are not 
the only factors to be considered when contemplating a buy," Walt 
says. "It may be that the highest rated show or the most popular sta- 
tion is not the most efficient vehicle 
for the clients' commercials. An 
understanding of the basic appeal 
of a program or programs can be a 
better guide to sensible buying. 
Also, the market itself can be a de- 
ciding factor in determining if the 
product is suited for the area. Spe- 
cific market studies, not just effec- 
tive buying income, households, 
retail sales and population figures, 
shed more light on the market's 
potential." Walt thinks that with 
the constant changes in living patterns, population increases and 
tremendous industry growth, it is equally important for buyers to 
keep up to date, both through the station representatives and their 
own research. "This research data is essential to good buying." 



Ed Gallagher, Albert Woodley Co., New York, thinks that "there is 
a need for more qualitative defining of audiences rather than the 
quantitative stress which is placed on them today. It is not sufficient 
to define listeners or viewers as a sum total. A more important 
factor is the type of person who is tuned to programs. Merely saying 

there is 2.2 persons per set does 
not answer the question of will or 
can this audience buy the product. 
Data is needed on economic stat- 
ure, shopping habits, extraordi- 
nary market factors, buying power 
and working habits." Ed says that 
there is little or none of this infor- 
mation available without utilizing 
hours of precious time researching 
it. Rep salesmen, he feels, should 
be prepared to present this data in 
one neat package whenever the 
buyer calls for it. "Of course, reps are not entirely at fault when 
they lack this information. Stations know far better the special fea- 
tures of their market, but apparently think it is not important enough 
to inform their rep. Other media go to all lengths in presenting salient 
market facts; there's no reason why broadcast can't do the same." 




SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1955 





Merchandising 









NBC-TV 
BASIC 

Tom Tinsley 

President 

Irvin Abeloff 
Vice Pres. 



1. FEATURE FOODS MERCHANDISING 

2. COMMUNITY CLUB AWARDS 



3. IN-STORE FOOD DISPLAYS 



4. IN-STORE DRUG DISPLAYS 

5. IN-STORE FOOD DEMONSTRA- 
TIONS, SAMPLING, COUPONING 

6. STORE WINDOW DISPLAYS 

7. BARGAIN BAR PROMOTIONS 

8. MAILINGS TO RETAILERS 

9. PERSONAL CALLS ON JOBBERS, 
WHOLESALERS, RETAILERS 

10. REPORTS TO FOOD ADVERTISERS 

11. PROMOTIONAL SPOTS 

12. NEWSPAPER ADS 




in the rich 

market of 

Richmond, 

Petersburg 

& Central Va. 






National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington 
Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, Miami, New Orleans; McGavren-Quinn in Chicago, Detroit and West Coast 

10 JANUARY 1959 



THE 













30 years 
Service 

in the Columbus Area 
is the key-stone of 
WRBL policy in provid- 
ing TOP Quality pro- 
grams for all Audiences 



WRBL 



Pioneer and Leader in 
Columbus since 7928 

Complete local news 
coverage since 1937 
Proudly— a CBS 
affiliate since 1939 

WBBL-FM 

First Station in Georgia with 
Daily Stereophonic Music 

FM operation continuously since 
1946 . . . 



Exclusive FM in Columbus since 
1953 . . . 

It's the combination of 

Quality and 

Experience 

which makes WRBL Radio 

the New and Preferred 

tune-in habit 
of the Columbus Area 



WRBL w AD H° FM 

5KW 25KW 

COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 

Represented by 
GEO. P. HOLLINGBERY 






10 




by Joe Csiila 



Sponsor 




Throw that guy out! 

I get as indignant as the next broadcast- 
industry boy over the sometimes sneaky, some- 
times stupid assaults on radio and/or video by 
the print media. Not excepting the recent For- 
tune and Life slams, to which more capable 
critics than I have made adequate answer. 

I do wonder, however, how many smart ad- 
vertising agency men, how many experienced 
business men are truly fooled by the distorted, shamefully slanted 
propaganda pieces published by many of our print friends. It's my 
guess that a vast number of advertising men and their clients, espe- 
cially the smarter ones, consider most of these poison-pen pitches 
somewhat of an insult to their intelligence. 

And it's my further guess that the feeble folderol, however well- 
written, trying to prove that radio/tv are over-rated, over-priced 
media have a boomerang effect. I think it has helped lead ( if only 
indirectly ) enough advertisers to put more money into the broad- 
cast media, to account, at least in part, for the fact that ad expendi- 
ures in both radio and television are up, while loot laid out for 
magazines I including Time, Life and Fortune) is down. 

Let's keep it a clean fight 

I do believe that it's vitally important for every segment of the 
trade, broadcasters themselves, the industry press, et al, to fight the 
good competitive fight against the print media. I believe all the 
positive selling we can muster should be mustered. When Pulse 
shows that out-of-home radio listening for the summer, for example, 
added 28.3% to the in-home audiences during 1958, as opposed to 
a 17.3%-out-of-home addition in 1951, I feel we should, one and all, 
spread the word. 

When the TvB comes up with figures to show that the average 
weekday, daytime show in 1958 pulled some 140,000 people more 
to the set than the average weekday, daytime stanza in 1957, I say, 
hurrav, and lookahere, everybody. And when the average night time 
program draws 556,000 more people in '58, than its equivalent seg 
ment in '57, again huzzahs should be transmitted wide and far. 

In short, with positive, constructive believable selling, and wit 
becoming dignity, we should beat their brains out. But I do no: 
approve of the practice of utilizing the skunk's own weapons agains 
him. Inevitably, I believe such a practice would boomerang. 

An example of the kind of competitive selling I feel we coul 
readily have done without was the recent Trendex survey, conducte 
for Blair-TV and the John Blair & Co., video and radio reps respee 
tively of some of the finest broadcast properties in the country, 
am unstinting in my admiration for Blair's talents as salesmen of th< 
broadcast media, for their enthusiasm and aggressiveness. But whei 
they pitch a survey which tends to pooh-pooh newspapers, I leav 
the room. I am a broadcast man, first, last and have been lo, thes' 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195' 



J 





Qxotxrte^ 



T^u. 



tertA tO 




1 



"19 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD. HOLLYWOOD 28/HOLLYWOOD 3-5151 






.OBER T M . PURCELL 



president and general manager • MILTON H.KLEIN, sales manager 



■ " ■■ ■' 



n © r n 



JAXIE" SAYS, 



"YOUR BEST 
NIGHTIME MINUTES 
IN JACKSONVILLE 
ARE ON WFGA-TV" 



Sponsor backstage continued 




You'll find a lineup of top shows to 
use in sending your sales message 
into the booming North Florida- 
South Georgia television area. This 
rich $1 '2 billion market is ready 
and receptive ... so move in with 
minutes on: 

* RESCUE EIGHT — Mondays — 7:30 
to 8:00 PM 

* HONEYMOONERS — Tuesdays — 
10:30 to 11:00 PM 

* BOLD VENTURE 

Reach deep for results and reach 
for WFGA-TV. It's your best buy 
in the Jacksonville Metropolitan 
Market. 

For further information on one 
minute availabilities, call Ralph 
Nimmons in Jacksonville at ELgin 
6-3381 or contact your nearest 
P.G.W. "Colonel." 

BASIC NBC AND SELECTED 
ABC PROGRAMMING 

Represented nationally by 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



WFGA-TV 

Channel 12 

Jacksonville, Florida 



FLORIDA'S 
COLORFUL STATION 









12 



many years. But there is no broadcast operation in the world, whic 
performs its function any better than a newspaper called the Ne 
} ork Times. 

The Trendex study showed that 35.9 % of the 1000 people in Nev 
York's five boroughs who constituted the random sample interviewed, 
were not inconvenienced by the 18-day newspaper strike. Of these 
same 1,000, only 77%> had heard of the launching of the new U.S. 
satellite; about 47% had heard that Mao Tse Tung was abdicating; 
and about 59% had heard about the horrible department story fire 
in Bogota, Colombia. Certainly no radio or tv newscast failed to 
carry these items — and anyone who switched from one station or 
channel newscast to another through some hours of some days as 
1 did (and I'm sure many others did) would have heard these same 
items on every station in newscast after newscast. 

The people who obviously hadn't heard about these events didn't 
miss their newspapers; they didn't miss their radio or tv newscasts 
either. They probably wouldn't miss their own heads, if someone 
could remove the heads without making too much of a rattle. 

59.1% of this thousand were "inconvenienced" by the unavail- 
ability of major newspapers. Of this 59.1%, 19.6% missed the 
advertisements of sales; 16% missed the news; 9.1% missed special 
features; 7.7% missed "it" all; 1.4% missed keeping up on current 
events; 2.1% missed the financial news; and 13.3% complained be- 
cause they said they got more news in papers than on radio or tv. 

Why take the defensive? 

I did not sit in on the presentation of the findings of this survey 
to advertising agency men, clients, or who have you by Blair repre- 
sentatives. I cannot, therefore, baldly state that they were in any way 
attempting to show that the newspaper strike in New York proved 
that radio and tv are much more important as news media than 
newspapers; or that people can really get along fine without news 
papers. Or even that it proved that tv and radio are better advertis 
ing media than newspapers. 

Tv and radio, I believe have proved over and over again that they 
are more effective, less expensive advertising media than newspapers. 
They prove it every day. And I'm confident they'll continue to prove 
it for many, many another long eon. 

But, if I were a buyer of advertising, and a broadcast salesman 
came into my office and tried to tell me that people didn't miss their 
newspapers, I think I would throw him out. I might even (as soon as 
the papers got back in print), cancel a couple of spots on his station, 
and buy an extra 100 lines on two columns in my favorite paper, jusl 
to indicate to him that I dislike having my intelligence insulted . . 
by broadcasters, as well as Time, Inc. ^ 






Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

Do you always agree with what Joe Csida says in Sponsor Back- 
stage? Joe and the editors of SPONSOR will be happy to receive 
and print your comments. Address them to Joe Csida, c/o 
SPONSOR, 40 East 49th Street, New York 17, New York. 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 







Which "twin 



gets your WAV E ? 




**~ 



WAVE Radio celebrated its 25th Anniversary on 

December 30 — WAVE-TV its 10th on November 24. 

Each of these remarkable sister stations wins the cake in its category because: 

WAVE-TV, Channel 3, the first television station in Kentucky, 

is also first in ratings — first in coverage — 

first in number of listeners — first in values for advertisers. 

WAVE RADIO, famed for a quarter century as the Louisville area's 

prestige regional station, still gives you all the richest part of Kentucky — 

without the cost of covering Chicken Bristle, Big Bone, Gravel Switch, etc.! 





r a 



d i o 



WAVE 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Both Represented by NBC Spot Sales 



television 



SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



13 



*m 



Since CBS Radii 

announced PCI 

U. S. advertisers 

have investe 

$4,136,000 in 

new and expanded 
schedules on th 

CBS Radio Networl 



] 



, Program Consolidation Plan, 
effective January 5, is the 
first major forward step to 
assure network advertisers 
of larger national audiences. 
These greater values are 
created through uniform 
station clearances, news 
every hour on the hour and 

I more effective sequencing 
of entertainment programs. 
Full details on request. 



New multi-million dollar 
investment in CBS Radio 
Network from industry leaders 
like: Bristol-Myers Co., 
California Packing, Fram 
(Filter) Corporation, General 
Electric (Lamp Division) , 
Lever Brothers, Lewis-Howe 
I Co., Q-Tips Sales Corp., 
I Standard Packaging Corp. , 
■ Stewart-Warner Corp. (Alemite 
' Division), and many others. 




Greatest sales 
period of any 

radio network 
in years. 







Family Radio 
Is 

Scholarship, 
Showmanship, 

Salesmanship. 



Bartell scholarship provides the research 

by which the dominant family audience 

is attained in each Bartell market. 

Bartell showmanship develops a 

glittering progression of 

music, family fun, community service. 

Bartell salesmanship produces 
positive results for advertisers. 

Bartell it... and sell it! 



BRMELL 

mnv 




COAST W COAST 




AMERICA'S FIRST RADIO FAMILY SERVING 15 MILLION BUYERS 

Sold Nationally by ADAM YOUNG INC. 



16 



SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 195 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



10 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



There could be a good omen for advertising in general (and tv in particular) 
in the fact that the 1958 profits of many major corporations turned out much high- 
er than anticipated at planning time. 

As has been the custom, the bulk of advertisers had geared budgets not only to expected 
sales but to expected earnings. 

The lesson they'll probably note from their timidity in 1958 is that earnings might 
have been appreciably higher had they shown more confidence in the outlook and 
done some heavier advance budgeting for advertising. 

Those higher profit figures serve as a favorable sign, therefore, for media that 
require longer planning and commitments — a la tv. And all around, the climate is 
improving. 



BBDO, Minneapolis, has put out a feeler for tv minutes around nighttime and 
Sunday afternoon sportscasts for an "undisclosed product with male appeal." 
The campaign would start in March. 



Agencies can expect to get NBC TV's new ground rules for minimum station line- 
up buying by mid-month. March will be the likely starting time. 

NBC's rules follow the same pattern of minimum dollar volume and percentage 
of the total network rate as those recently introduced by CBS TV. 

(See 20 December SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 15, for salient provisions of CBS TV 
plan.) 

The main activity in national spot tv this week was along the renewal line. 

Among the bigger extenders were Alberto -Culver (Geoffrey Wade) for minutes in night- 
time movies for 52 weeks; and Maxwell House Instant (Benton & Bowles) for ID's in 
about 45 markets. 

(B&B has been lend-leasing these spots for seasonal runs, but it feels doubtful that it'll 
be able to continue now that the station list has been cut down from 90-odd.) 



New York and Chicago continue to stay ahead of the national pattern in the 
percentage of homes using radio. 

Note this illuminating comparison of homes tuned in during the fall of 1958 vs. 
the year before, which Nielsen this week pulled out of its station index at SPONSOR- 
SCOPE's request: 



SPONSOR 







CHANGE 




CHANGE 




CHANGE 


MON.-FRI. 


NEW YORK 


'58 vs. '57 


CHICAGO '58 


vs. '57 


NATIONAL '58 


vs. '57 


6-9 a.m. 


16.1 


+18.4% 


22.7 


+12.4% 


11.2 


+ 4.7% 


9-12 noon 


17.1 


+17.9% 


18.4 


- 3.2% 


14.0 


+12.9% 


12-3 p.m. 


11.5 


+ 9.5% 


15.1 


- 8.5% 


12.5 


+ 1.6% 


3-6 p.m. 


8.3 


+ 7.8% 


14.0 


+ 2.9% 


9.9 


+ 3.1% 


6-9 p.m. 


8.6 


- 1.2% 


9.1 


+24.7% 


9.2 


- 1.1% 


9-12 mid. 


3.8 


+ 8.6% 


5.4 


—14.3% 


6.4 


-13.5% 


10 JANUARY 1959 












1 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Coldene, out of JWT, Chicago, is changing its spot vehicle. 

It's pulling out of tv and putting all air media billings into spot radio. 



INTA, which up to now has concerned itself exclusively with tv, has been tak- 
ing a look at radio. 

The objective: organizing a transcription network limited to the top 50 markets. 

Ray Nelson, assistant to NTA president Eli Landau, has talked to quite a number of 
radio stations in such markets about the idea. Their reactions are now being "cerebrat- 
ed," as Nelson puts it, by NTA planners. 

The new AFTRA tv code takes into account that making commercials can be 
dangerous. 

Two provisions that point this up: 

1 ) Actors and announcers that participate in the production of a commercial that looks 
physically hazardous are entitled to a "premium rate" of $50 extra. 

2) Producers using locations outside the U.S. and Canada are required to take out 
a $50,000 death or disability policy for each AFTRA member involved. 



Year-round regional spot radio advertisers are beginning to take advantage 
of an open market by imposing tough renewal conditions. 

For example: A major spender headquartered on the West Coast is insisting that his 
spots be improved at the end of every 13-week cycle — even if it means ousting an es- 
tablished account, or accounts. 

His objective, in effect: Getting a guarantee that his cost-per-thousand will go 
lower each quarter. 

The first business week of the new year started off rather lively for the radio 
networks. 

NBC shared with CBS in multi-$100,000 hauls from Bristol-Myers, Lever's Surf, 
and Sterling Drug. 

CBS also got six daytime units a week from Ex-Lax and a couple Impacts a week 
from Hudson Vitamin. 

ABC wrapped up about $10,000 a week for a minimum of 13 weeks from American 
Home products via participations in Breakfast Club and weekend news. 

All three networks reported this week that, judging from inquiries and proposals at hand, 
billings for the initial 1959 quarter should put them ahead of last year. 



You'll likely be interested in a comparison of what the female audience deems its 
favorite programs with the ranking Nielsen gives them on the basis of ratings. 

NBC TV this week matched the eight shows that the gentler sex told Tv Q Ratings it 

favored most against their latest Nielsen ratings, and these were the comparative standings: 



18 



PROGRAM 




TV Q RATING 


NIELSEN RANKING 


Real McCoys 




1 


10 


Wagon Train 




2 


1 


Father Knows 


Best 


3 


36 


NBC News 




4 


115 


Perry Mason 




5 


9 


Gunsmoke 




6 


2 


I Love Lucy 




7 


90 


Perry Como 




8 


5 

SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



NBC TV's sales department is starting off the year with a target list of pros- 
pects rated above-average. 

This roster numbers about 25, and is composed of companies that spend at least 
$2.5 million a year for advertising. 

What the network is bent on doing in 1959 is broadening its base of sponsors. Like 
the other networks, NBC TV is loaded with soap and tobacco business; so its aim will 
be to recapture the sponsors who left network tv for some reason or another after a 
fling. In short, NBC is out to buy itself some sponsor insurance. 

Another source of potential income that tv will be striking hard at in 1959 will be 
the soft goods field, especially men's wear and furnishings. 

Among other things, the pitch will take the tack that tv is as effective and open for 
seasonal promotions as any other medium. 

Marketers point out that if there's any facet of the soft goods field where the label can 
be made important to the buyer it's in men's wear and furnishings. 

Kleinert, which specializes in baby wear, picked up a couple contiguous daytime 
quarter-hours on NBC TV this week. 

The business was placed by Grey. 

Tv programing critics thus far seem to be running ahead of the hearse: 

The number of network show casualties among the newcomers for the 1958-59 season 
looks as though it will fall far short of the previous year. 

An index to how things are faring this year: 

The casualty rate for new shows for the entire 1957-58 season was 58%. At the end 
of the first lap of the 1958-59 season, only seven out of 30 newcomers have hit 
the dust. That's less than 25%. 

(For a roundup and analysis of tv network programing at this point, see page 31.) 

Despite the more pronounced leveling of the tv audience among the three networks, the 
cost-per-thousand for advertisers in the top rating rungs has gone up very little 
compared to a year ago. 

In fact, there's relatively no difference in the average cost-per-1000-homes-per-com- 
mercial-minute between the top 10's in the Nielsen first December reports for 1957 and 1958. 

The average for the first 10 a year ago was $2.08. This time it's $2.09. 

Applying SPONSOR-SCOPE's estimate of net time and gross talent costs to Nielsen's 
calculations of average homes per program for the top 10 in the first December report, 
the cost per commercial impression comes out as follows: 



PROGRAM 


TIME PLUS TALENT 


AVERAGE HOMES 


CPMHPCM 


Gunsmoke 


$95,000 


15,573,000 


$2.06 


Wagon Train 


88,000* 


15,008,000 


1.95 


Have Gun, Will Travel 


93,000 


14,921,000 


2.10 


Rifleman 


76,000 


13,659,000 


1.90 


Danny Thomas 


97,500 


13,833,000 


2.30 


I've Got a Secret 


82,000 


13,703,000 


1.99 


Wells Fargo 


98,000 


13,616,000 


2.35 


Maverick 


136,000** 


13,181,000 


1.75 


Real McCoys 


74,000 


12,702,000 


1.94 


The Texan 


92,000 


12,876,000 


2.42 


*Cost of half-hour unit. 


**Cost of full hour's r 


>rogram. 





'ONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Ballantine (Esty) has elected to go after the highbrow category of beer drink- 
ers on a year-round basis. 

It's bought 40 spots a week on the Concert Network. 



That switchover of the $4.5 million Cluett, Peabody account from Y&R to Len- 
nen & Newell last week also claimed a major casualty on the client end. 

J. Baxter Gardner, C-P advertising and sales promotion boss, resigned when 
top management insisted on making the change. 

(See 13 December 1959 SPONSOR HEARS for likely factors behind the shift.) 

Chalk up Syracuse as the No. 1 skirmish market in P&G's drive to wrest away 
Lestoil's leadership in the all-purpose liquid detergent sweepstakes. 

P&G started pitting its own Mr. Clean against Lestoil in Syracuse last July, when Les- 
toil had 5% of the whole Syracuse detergent market in its grip. 

At the end of October, Mr. Clean's share was higher than Lestoil's at that time. 
In other words, the P&G entry appeared to have stopped Lestoil in its tracks. 

Maybelline put something of a pall on the New Year's cheer of Chicago reps by 
its $2-million switch from spot tv to the Perry Como show. 

The reasons Maybelline's agency, Gordon Best, gave for the divorce from spot: (1) 
Lack of minutes in prime time, and (2) Como's endorsement. 

Maybelline tried spectaculars — of the highbrow sort — some years back, but apparently 
wasn't satisfied with the results. 

Look for a recharge of the new-business batteries at Compton now that Barton 
A. Cummings, president, has taken over from chairman R. D. Holbrook as the chief execu- 
tive officer. 

Cummings has been sparking the drive for new accounts all along, but his additional 
powers will give added impetus to his admitted drive for the $100-million brackets. 

Incidentally, Holbrook is the last of the old top management corps. 

Some 20 tv stations seem to be holding the bag for money due them on a Ste- 
phens Dandruff Remover campaign as the result of a dispute between Stephens and the 
product's former agency, J. J. Coppo, of Baldwin, N. Y. 

Coppo's explanation: A portion of the tv funds was to come from Stephen's dis- 
tributors; but when the hair tonic's maker changed agencies and instructed the distribu- 
tors to make no more payments to Coppo, there was no money to pay to stations. 

The account is now with Cunningham & Walsh. 



Rep salesmen trying to make a pitch for a slice of that sizable L&M spot radio 
melon temporarily found themselves in a frustrating maze. 

In the rush to get the business placed before New Years, DFS' media department 
split the long station list among many timebuyers. 

The result was that nobody knew what timebuyer was doing the buying for a 
particular station; so the reps found themselves in a brief game of button, button, who's 
got the button. 



20 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 44; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 59; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 60; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 74; and Film-Scope, page 57. 

SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 19' 







KPRC No. 1 for BELIEV ABILITY 



"You can generally 
believe them and trust 
what vou have heard. 




Should you like further information on this 
revealing Dichter Probe, wire, write or 
phone. A printed booklet, "The People Talk 
Back to Radio" will be forwarded, posthaste 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., Inc 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 




SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



21 



FROM COAST-TO COAST. . . 

TREMENDOUS 




DEMAND 



FOR ECONOMEE'S TWO GREAT NEW SERIES! 



SNAPPED UP BY STATIONS LIKE THESE: 



KMSP-TV 

Minneapolis 

KDIX-TV 

Dickinson, N. D. 

KRBC-TV 

Abilene, Tex. 



KNOP 

North Platte, Neb. 

WEAR-TV 

Pensacola, Fla. 



WFMJ-TV 

Youngstown, Ohio 



KHSL-TV 

Chico, Calif. 



KXJB-TV 

Valley City, N. D. 



KTNT-TV 

Seattle 



KABC-TV 

Los Angeles 



WRCV-TV 

Philadelphia 




KXMC-TV 

Minot, N. D. 



WGR-TV 

Buffalo, N. Y. 



KBMB-TV 

Bismarck, N. D. 




KRTV 



Great Falls, Mont. 



WGN-TV WSIL-TV 

Chicago Harrisburg, III. 

AND MORE! 



CKLW-TV 

Detroit 

WTOK-TV 

Meridian, Miss. 



KVKM 

Monahans- Odessa- 
Midland. Texas 



The proven audience appeal for both of these power- 
packed prestige series offers a golden opportunity to 
strengthen programming, boost sales. 

You'll win community praise* as you out-pace your 
competition with these timely, vital shows. They are still 
available in some markets for full or alternate sponsor- 
ship or as spot carriers. Get details NOW! 



'EXTRA! AN EXCITING, ALL-NEW CONTEST PROMOTION! ENDORSED BY SUPERINTENDENTS OF THE U. S. MILITARY AND 
U. S. NAVAL ACADEMIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. Use it to gain immediate attention, interest and response in 
your community! For exclusive use of sponsors of 'MEN OF ANNAPOLIS" and "WEST POINT". 




1ST RUN RATINGS 
FOR "WEST POINT" 



BOSTON 

43.5 


PITTSBURGH 

52.5 


OMAHA 

42.0 


PROVIDENCE 

37.5 


MINNEAPOLIS 

1 32.3 


SYRACUSE 

33.8 



Source: ARB and Pulse 



S£fi/SAT/OML 

1ST RUN RATINGS FOR 
"MEN OF ANNAPOLIS" 

JACKSONVILLE NEW ORLEANS 

31.0 49.5 





DAYTON PEORIA 

32.5 32.5 



BUFFALO BOISE 

26.0 28.6 



Source: ARB and Pulse 



I I ^M 




RATING 

PR0VED- 

ZIV 

PRODUCED 



ECONOMEE TELEVISION PROGRAMS 

488 Madison Avenue • New York 22. New York 




The best things in life... 

iightfully called one of the most beautiful 
cities in America, Houston is a fascinating 

melding of the old and the very new. The 
homes have a distinct and personal charm. 

. ..whether they be stately mansions alive 
with tradition or rambling contemporary 

homes reflecting the comfortable way of life. 





Serene and 

picturesque, 

the homes in 

River Oaks stand 

as the very 

embodiment 

of gracious living. 



K T R K T v 



-ABC BASIC 



P.O. BOX 12, HOUSTON 1, TEXAS-ABC BASIC GENERAL MANAGER, 

HOUSTON CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION CO. WILLARD E. WALBRIOGE 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: 6E0. P. HOLLINGBERV CO.. COMMERCIAL MANAGER. 

500 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 36, N.Y. BILL BENNETT 



24 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 19) 



f 



49th and 
Madison 



Kindly Scrooge 

[ust a small note from Scrooge: — in- 
. piicd by your 27 December stor\. 
Things I Got For Christmas I 
lould've Done Without." 

After a number of years on all 
ides of the advertising — mass com- 
nunications field, I fervently look 
inward to the day when Christmas 
vill be abandoned to a personal lim- 
i reserved for the individual, his 
xiends, and his family or even for 
omplete non-observance. I agree 
fith your Christmas article and in 
bet have just sat down and figured 
ut that none of the material I re- 
served this Christmas from business 
(ssociates — including ashtrays, desk 
lotters and printed unsigned cards 
i f doing anybody any good except the 
i uy who sold them. 

M\ firm . . . has taken the easy way 
|ut of the Christmas rat race. We 
ml cards that cost about a penny 
piece to all of our friends and asso- 
ntes in the field — and then donate 
h the name of your friends, the 
ionev we formerly spent on useless 
ifts, to a home for rheumatic chil- 
| ren. We now feel as if we are doing 
kmething akin to the real reason for 
hristmas. 

Our card, by the way reads as 
Hows: 



I 



!«* 



"Sure, it's fun to get presents 
— and fun to give them too. Few 
things are as exciting — for 
grownups — as watching a young- 
ster find a long-hoped for electric 
train or a frilly new doll under 
the Christmas tree. 

And few things are sadder 
than Christmas in the hospital 
for children ill with rheumatic 
fever. 

Christmas is for kids — and 
kids are for running and jump- 
ing and playing hard. Children 
who can't run and jump now 
have a lot of catching up to do. 

In this spirit, we have pre- 
[Continued on next pa^e) 






In this Billion $ Sales Empire WREX-TV 
is the TOP KING SALESMAN! 



r\ 







TOPS IN COVERAGE 

TOPS IN PROGRAMMING 

TOPS IN RATINGS 

ALL 8 of TOP 8 SHOWS 
18 of TOP 19 SHOWS 
35 of TOP 50 SHOWS 

87% OF TOP 40 SHOWS 
ON WREX-TV 

Based on American Research Bureau 
Survey conducted October and 
November 1958. 



Consumer Total 

Grade Tolal Spendable Retail Television 

Households Income Sales Sets 



A 


176,731 


$1,048,013,000 


$ 744.271,000 


154.699 


B 


157,607 


$ 987,797.000 


$ 699,092,000 


141.334 


C 


78,761 


$ 466.963,000 


$ 324,932.000 


69.900 


Total 


413,099 


$2,502,773,000 


$1,768,295,000 


365.933 



The sales power of 
WREX-TV's combined 
coverage, spans market 
portions of over 30 
counties in southern 
Wisconsin — northern 
Illinois. Brings preferred 
CBS-ABC network pro- 
grams, top syndicated 
programs and MGM-TV's 
Golden Treasury of Feature 
Films to over 365,000 
television homes. 



Source 1958 Sales mai 
• \ ol buj i 



VIDEO-229,000 watts ERP 
AUDIO -114,000 watts ERP 

CBS-ABC NETWORK AFFILIATION 
represented by 



H-R TELEVISION, INC. 
J. M. BAISCH, GEN. MGR. 



0fi ' 



>NSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 




S.0 




.a.* tt\e m ag . 




more later. 



Buy the whole 

TEXAS MONEY BELT 

and OlLL it from the 

CENTER 




WITH 




K V K 



Channel 9 abc 

MONAHANS, TEXAS 



AM 
TV 



Representatives 
Everett McKinney, Inc. 
| Clyde Melville, SW 



Ross Rucker, Pres. 
Hillman Taylor, TV Mgr. 
Ken Welch, Radio Mgr. 



26 



49TH AND MADISON 

(Cont'd from page 25) 

seated a gift in your name to 
the boys and girls at La Rabida 
Sanitarium. 

To you we give our warmest 
good wishes for a happy holi- 
day season and a peaceful, hap- 
py, and prosperous New Year." 
Bernard H. Merems 
The Public Relations Board 

P.S. Bah, Humbug, to baskets of fruit 
which rot before I remember to 
take them home. 

Iowa survey 

In your December 13, 1958 issue you 
referred to a recent Iowa TV-Radio 
survey by Dr. F. L. Whan. 

Please let me know where I can get 
a complete copy of this study and any 
others which he has made in recent 
years. 

In closing, may I say that I find 
SPONSOR very interesting and the most 
helpful of any of the TV-Radio publi- 
cations. 

Lester Johnson 

Applegate Advertising Agency 

Muncie, Indiana 

• SPONSOR suggests writing directly to Dr. 
Whan at the University of Iowa. 

Tv results 

I have just finished reading your tv 
results section in the January 3 issue 
of SPONSOR and found it very infor- 
mative. 

There is certainly a definite need 
for such information which is also I 
quickly scanned and easily obtain 
able. Merely as a suggestion, I might 
add that it might be helpful for those 
of us who keep a file of back issues, 
that the results sections be perforated 
so as to make them more easily torm 
out. This would also help keep the 
magazines in one piece. Keep such 
excellent sections coming during the 
next year. 

Jack Jacobsen 
Calexico Area, Calif 

r. • * 

Film section 

. . . Enjoying the new section on Fiht 
Commercials. It's going to be veri 
interesting to see how tape develop 
new techniques in 'live' commercial; 

Elizabeth Freema 

Chicago 






• SPONSOR is planning a special Fil 
mercials issue the 17 January issue. 



Cor 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 




KOMO 

RADIO and 

TELEVISION 

take pleasure in announcing 
the appointment of 

THE KATZ AGENCY 

as their 

NATIONAL 
SALES 

REPRESENTATIVE 
EFFECTIVE 

JANUARY 1, 1959 

KOMO- AM 50,000 Watts 1,000 kc KOMO-TV Channel 4 Serving Seattle and Western Washington 

ONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 27 



BBS 






mm 

m 



uy 



■HI 



^KHH9 

H ill 

9 



■ 



£GH 



HP 






ii 



k 



■a 



H 






■ 




f 



.*:* 



£$ 



v 




m gredi television Tirsu 

MANTOVANI 

The music. ..the manner 
...the millions who love 
the rich magnificence of 
allthatisMantovani f all 
yours. In 39 gala half- 
hour shows, Mr. Manto- 
vani sweeps across the 
television screen with 
scintillating sight and 
sound. Every half-hour 
is a new and different 
theme, a new and dif- 
ferent full scale produc- 
tion with settings and 
sequences... costuming 
and choreography add- 
ing dazzling detail to 
the delight of Manto- 
vani's 46-piece orches- 
tra. It's all yours, plus an 
exciting Corps de Ballet, 
and big name guests 
such as Vic Damonejhe 
Hi-Lo's, Connie Francis, 
the Boscoe Holder West 
Indian Dancers .... The 
London Festival Ballet, 
Belita, The Band of The 
H. M. Welsh Guards, All 
Saints Boys Choir. And 
John Conte is your host. 



■ 






Most of all, there is this 
name...Mantovani. Now 
for the first time on TV, 
MANTOVANI from NTA! 



T 



Ten Columbus Circle, 
New York 19, New York 

National Telefilm Associates, Inc. 



IlS@i 




heard this news first on ABC RADIO 



FIRST! 



ABC Radio News brings first 
word of Pope John's election 
to American public. 



FIRST! 

ABC Radio News reports 
Lebanese President Chamoun's 
appeal for help in Mid-East crisis. 



FIRST! 

ABC Radio News reports 
Charles de Gaulle will bid for 
leadership of French government. 




19S8: Year of tension and crisis. Far East, Mid-East, 
Latin America, U.S.A. Almost every part of the world 
was news. And in this memorable year ABC Radio 
News made news by consistently scooping its com- 
petition. The news beats above are but three examples. 

One hundred and twenty-five ABC reporters and 
overseas correspondents bring the news to the Ameri- 
can public almost as swiftly as it happens. Twenty- 
one foreign news bureaus — from Moscow to Tokyo, 
from London to Cairo — probe for news twenty-four 
hours a day, seven days a week. 

ABC's domestic bureaus — staffed by such distin- 
guished personalities as John Daly, Quincy Howe, 
Edward P. Morgan, John W. Vandercook, John 



Secondari and Bill Shadel — report and analyze world 
and national news. 

Today's news is made — and changed — with great 
frequency. Major news breaks can't wait even for 
regularly scheduled news programs. With ABC's ex- 
clusive News Alert System, ABC stations can broad- 
cast news flashes instantly. No matter where the news 
is made, their audiences keep up with the people, 
places and events of the hour — within seconds. 

People depend on radio for news. And over 
25,000,000 different people listen to ABC's award- 
winning news staff each month.* These people rec- 
ognize ABC's leadership in news reporting. So do 
ABC affiliates and advertisers. 



C RADIO NETWORK 



'According to the A. C. Nielsen Company 



30 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 19.' 



SPO NSOR 



lO JANUARY 1959 



'NlllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

TV SHOW CANCELLATIONS AND REPLACEMENTS 



CANCELLATION 



TYPE WENT OFF REPLACEMENT 



JACKIE CLEASON C 

PURSUIT M 

$64,000 QUESTION Q 

KEEP TALKING* _ Q 

ANYBODY CAN PLAY* _ Q 

TWENTY-ONE Q 

CONCENTRATION Q 

BRAINS AND BRAWN . Q 

ED WYNN SHOW* SC 

TIC TAC DOUGH Q 



2Jan. RAWHIDE 

14 Jan. ..TRACKDOWN 

2 Nov. KEEP TALKING 

8 Feb. .... RICHARD DIAMOND 

8 Dec. DR. I. Q. 

30 Oct. CONCENTRATION 

21 Nov. ... IT COULD BE YOU 

3 Jan. D.A.'s MAN 

8 Jan .STEVE CANYON 

5 Jan. ...BUCKSKIN 



TYPE 


NETWORK 


w 


CBS TV 


w 


CBS TV 


Q 


CBS TV 


M 


CBS TV 


Q 


ABC TV 


Q 


NBC TV 


Q 


NBC TV 


M 


NBC TV 


A 


NBC TV 


W 


NBC TV 



'Sponsored casualties that made their debuts this season. Key: C, comedy; M, mystery; Q, quiz; SC, situation comedy; \\\ western; A, adventure. 

: ,: :;. .I 1 '. .Mi 1 "...:i . .:ii: : i : . : ! i , . ; . ; ; i i ' ;'i: ..,! ; ;: :.. :.,;;ii; :;;;:,:, , i; : ;:,; ...m 1 ,,,ii .. ii- ' .:;,::::.. ; .. ;!iiiii;. 1 ,,;iii 1 ,.. 1 ,;iiiJi..iiiiiiii ;;i;lil:;■:;illli!:.:■: ■.;;iiiL; : ,l,:im:, ; 1 ;;;iii:;;:.ii!ii. ,.:i;i; . :n : - ::; ;;, 



V STILL GOES THATAWAY 



1^ Mid-season round-up shows the Westerns riding 
ligh, wide and handsome. Quizzes are hardest hit 

^ After 13 weeks, seven of this fall's brand new 
tarters have bitten dust, and others are in doubt 



I he first lap of the 1958-59 net- 
ork tv season has been completed 
iid the Westerns lead the field. There 
I ere a few crack-ups among both 
eterans and first-time starters, but 

»<>uld be a rare meet when the 
I hole field was still intact at this time. 

Here are the highlights of the first 
3-week lap: 
' • Of about 30 brand new night- 



time shows that started the season, 
seven have been casualties. This is 
a 25% mortality, not bad for an\ 
branch of show business, and cer- 
tainly well under the 58% calamiu 
list which ended last year's season. 

• Of 127 shows l new and hold- 
oxers I. the end of 13 weeks found 10 
sponsored ones that bit the dust. 

• Westerns, which some believed 



would have run out their welcome 
this season, are still riding high, wide 
and handsome: in fact, are dominat- 
ing the tv season. The last Nielsen 
average audience rating showed seven 
\\ csterns in the top 10. In fact, the 
first four of that list were \\ esterns, 
proving it's tough to beat the horses. 
• Audience participation show-. 
especially of the quiz category, had 
the highest mortality rate: seven were 
cancelled. This was foreordained 1>\ 
the summer's quiz show scandals. But 
don't hang up the crepe yet; three 
of them were replaced In othei 
quizzes and they're still running. I he 
audience particip show is usuall) a 
reasonably-priced vehicle, and appar- 
ent!) there are always some sponsors 
reach for that kind of bargain. 



PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



31 



• One comedy show (Jackie Glea- 
son) and one situation comedy (Ed 
Wynn ) were retired from the field 
which most admen agree is not suffi- 
cient reason to write off either cate- 
gory. 

• Certainly, the axings are not 
over. In the next 13 weeks, more 
shows will fall. Some already show- 
signs of trouble, especially those with 
high investment that are hatching pro- 
portionately low ratings. On the 
other hand, some new shows that be- 
gan the season with few kind words 
from the pro handicappers, have 
caught on surprisingly well. 

If all of this data suggests any sort 
of trend, it is that tv has matured to 
the point where it performs pretty 
much in the way it is expected to. 
People expect it to have show casual- 



ties, and it has them. But not at a 
higher rate than many other branches 
of show business. At the end of the 
first 26-week run of the 1956-57 sea- 
son, 15 out of 34 new shows had 
failed; last year, 26 out of 45 flopped. 
If the next 13-week stretch this season 
finds another seven shows cancelled 
— and the chances are very good that 
it may — then the 1958-59 season will 
have made it in just about par. 

In still another way, tv has grown 
up to the point where it is more sta- 
ble, more predictable. A look at the 
two charts on audience rating trends 
supplied by A. C. Nielsen Co. demon- 
strates that since 1955 a sort of show 
ratings plateau has been reached. The 
rating averages of the top bracket 
shows have become almost static; the 
same is true of the middle-rated pro- 



grams and of the cellar show group. 

The possibilities of a sponsor buy- 
ing a runaway are becoming less than 
they were in the early days of tv. On 
the other hand, the sponsor's chances 
of being stuck with a "turkey" also 
are diminished. 

The rise of ABC TV as a third net- 
work has certainly been a contribut- 
ing factor in this leveling out. The 
viewer has been given a still greater 
selection of programing to choose 
from, and as the audience has been 
divided, the average ratings have 
tended to draw closer together — both 
down from the top and up from the 
bottom. There will still be an occa- 
sional freak at either level, but it 
would appear they'll be rare. 

Since it is the viewing public that, 
through ratings, holds the power over 



llll![ll]!ll!illlll!l!lll!!!!!l!!l!ll!IINII!IIIII!!lllllllllll!lli!l!lllllll!l!IIII 



WESTERNS DOMINATE TOP 25 NIELSEN WITH lO 



SHOW 


NET 


NIGHT 


RATING 


TYPE 


FILM LIVE 


GUNSMOKE 


... CBS 


s 


36.4 


w 


F 


WAGON TRAIN 


. NBC 


w 


35.4 


w 


F 


HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL 


CBS 


s 


35.0 


w 


F 


RIFLEMAN, THE __ 


ABC 
... CBS 


Tu 
M 


33.1 
32.3 


w 

sc 


F 


DANNY THOMAS SHOW 


F 


I'VE COT A SECRET 


.._ CBS 


W 


32.3 


Q 


L 


TALES OF WELLS FARGO 


... NBC 


M 


32.0 


w 


F 


MAVERICK 


ABC 


Su 


31.9 


w 


F 


REAL McCOYS 


ABC 


Th 


30.7 


sc 


F 


TEXAN, THE 


CBS 


M 


30.4 


w 


F 


WYATT EARP 


ABC 


Tu 


30.4 


w 


F 


ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS 


CBS 


Su 


30.1 


M 


F 


RED SKELTON SHOW 


CBS 


Tu 


30.0 


c 


F 


LUCILLE BALL-DESI ARNAZ 


CBS 


M 


29.9 


Dr 


F 


PRICE IS RIGHT 


._ NBC 


W 


29.8 


Q 


L 


NAME THAT TUNE 


CBS 


M 


29.4 


Q 


L 


WANTED, DEAD OR ALIVE 


CBS 


S 

w 

s 

M 


29.4 
29.3 
28.7 
28.5 


w 

D 
V 
M 


F 


THIS IS YOUR LIFE 


. NBC 


L 


PERRY COMO SHOW 


NBC 


L 


PETER CUNN 


.... NBC 


F 


PERRY MASON 


CBS 


s 


28.5 
28.3 


M 
SP1 


F 


WONDERFUL TOWN 


— . CBS 


LCIAL 


G. E. THEATER 


..... CBS 


Su 


28.2 


Dr 


F 


CHEYENNE 


ABC 


Tu 


28.2 


W 


F 


JACK BENNY SHOW 


CBS 


Su 


28.0 


c 


F 






Key to type.: \V, western; Dr, drama; SC. situation comedy; 0. quiz; V, variety; M. mystery; ('. comedy; D, documentary 
Source: Nielsen Television Index Average Audience Ratine-; first report for Decembei 



minimi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii miiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiW 

32 SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1951 



pillllllllllllllllllllH 

HOW NIGHT TV RATINGS HAVE LEVELED SINCE 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiii 
1955 



OVER 307. 



15- 30% 



NO. OF 

PROGRAMS 



DISTRIBUTION BY RATING LEVELS 

AVG AUD (PSB) 



1955 

1007. 



15% [/327. 



12% 



56% 



139 



1956 

1007. 

3S 



66 




Charts courtesy of A. C. Nielsen Co. 



1957 

100% 



72 



V 7 ?, 

M 



130 



1958 

100% 



70 




AVERAGE AUDIENCE 

(PSB) 



TOP 10 PROGRAM * 



ALL PROGRAMS 



BOTTOM 10 PROGRAMS^ 



• OtliniK HMU> SOWS, OM TIMf OmY IDUlul 
• • lain mL tuaiOM SKKMU, Tl turn , Ml Mkl 




1957 1352 



!lllllllll!llllllll!lll!!ll!!l!ll!lll[lllllll!!l!llllllll!!lllllllll!lll!!l!!lllllllllllllllli 



1 



the network show, what conclusions 
about its taste in programing may 
be drawn from this season's record 
to date? 

The taste for the "adult Western" 
appears to be insatiable. As wit h am 
trend, it will inevitably bow to an- 
other, but a look at the top 25 Niel- 
sen-rated tv programs on these pages 
is a fair indication that the Western 
Will continue in the catbird sad'V' r for 
i long time to come. When seven out 
jf the top 10 shows are Westerns t is 
nore of a landslide than a trend. 

Ever since the Westerns started 
heir climb to popularity, critics have 
orecast an early demise of the show 
ype. They have based this on a no- 
oriously "fickle" public that has 
milt up and torn down tv idols be- 
ween one season and another. But 
erhaps they have misread some of 
he fickleness; chances are the public 
s more concerned with the individual 
now than with the show category. 
Mien the Western "trend" finally 
vanes, it will be on a show-by-show 
>asis with the weak ones falling first, 
leanwhile, the format of the "adult" 
I estern is an ideal tv vehicle. 

From a purely mechanical stand- 
oint, it provides an excellent frame- 
work for any kind of drama since it 
as built-in hero, villain and conflict ; 
is a framework readily identifiable 
ith the viewer since, even though he 
as never left the Bronx, he knows 



the West well from childhood through 
the neighborhood movie. 

On the psychological side, it has 
been pointed out that the Western is 
the ideal satisfier of the aggressive 
urge in us. It even has the double- 
barreled power of appealing to both 
sexes — there is action for the male 
audience, emotional conflict (the new 
ingredient of the "adult" Western) 
for the women. At present, it looks 
like a much sturdier outlet for escape 
and aggressiveness than does the 
crime or mystery show. 

The crime shows made a bid this 
season, but one — Pursuit — has al- 
ready failed. Two new ones are com- 
ing up as replacements for cancella- 
tions: NBC TV has just replaced 
quizzer Brains and Braivn with D.A.'s 
Man, and CBS TV will substitute an- 
other quiz fatality, Keep Talking, 
with Richard Diamond, Private De- 
tective on 15 February. But a look 
at the top 25 Nielsens shows only 
three mystery-crime shows aboard — 
new show Peter Gunn plus holdovers 
Perry Mason and Alfred Hitchcock — 
and none is near to unhorsing the 
Gun smokes or Wagon Trains. 

Whatever hot water the quiz and 
audience participation shows find 
themselves in was pre-heated by the 
scandals that set in before the season 
ever started. Oddly enough, two of 
them — $64,000 Question and Twenty- 
One — were replaced by other audi- 



ence shows — Keep Talking and Con- 
centration. The latter replacement 
failed in turn, was replaced in late 
November by still another of its ilk — 
It Could Be } ou. Keep Talking and 
Tic Tac Dough were two other casual- 
ties. Just the same, it is interesting 
to note in the top 25 chart that three 
quiz shows are making good — \ame 
That Tune, I've Got a Secret and 
Price is Right. 

Another interesting revelation of 
the top 25 list is the fact that this 
season appears to be especially good 
in ratings to the sophomores and 
freshman, that is those shows that 
began only this season and last. 

Six shows that began this fall are 
on the "honor roll" — The Rifleman. 
The Real McCoys, Tlie Texan, Desilu 
Playhouse, Wanted Dead or Alive and 
Peter Gunn. Nearly a dozen of the 
programs that had debuts the previ- 
ous season are in the top 25. with 
positions as high as two and three 
Wagon Train and Have Gun, IT ill 
Travel. This is fast building of show 
properties and some interpret it as a 
new trend in tv audience tastes and 
acceptance. Whether the rapid wann- 
ing up will spell quicker declines 
remains to be seen. 

So the 1958-59 season goes into it- 
next lap. Some of the shaking out 
has been done, but it goes without 
sa) ing that there'll be more to come, 
i Please turn to page 16 I 



PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



33 



Bab-O's Lachner re-plans market 



^ Colgate-trained president has completely reorgan- 
ized B. T. Babbitt Co. marketing during the past year 

^ New, modern policies are based on the conviction 
that "every market is different," he tells SPONSOR 



\Jn 1 January 1958 dynamic, per- 
sonable Marshall S. Lachner, a 44- 
year old marketing expert with an 
impressive background of soap indus- 
try selling, took over as president of 
venerable B. T. Babbitt. Inc. 

Facing him was an awesome job 
of corporate re-organization. Bab- 
bitt, though a household word in the 
cleanser field for 123 years, was 
under increasingly severe pressure 
from such giants as P&G, Lever, Col- 
gate. Its marketing policies were out- 
moded, its personnel disheartened, its 
advertising plans unformulated. 

Lachner, according to well-in- 
formed trade sources has successfully 
reversed the plunging Babbitt trend 
within the past 12 months. And for 
an explanation of the modern meth- 
ods he has used, sponsor arranged 
an exclusive interview wtih him at 



the company's executive offices, at 
Madison and 58th St., New York, on 
the last day of 1958. 

Lachner, a tall, handsome man who 
combines the assurance of a high 
level executive, with the affable per- 
sonality of a born salesman and the 
physique of a trained athlete (he was 
a halfback at the University of Penn- 
sylvania) talked easily and naturally 
about his first year accomplishments. 

"Taking the steps in order," he 
said, "we first of all made new finan- 
cial arrangements with the banks. 
Then we hit the road. We visited 
every single market and called on 
every single account. From that in- 
tensive, 13-week trip we began build- 
ing Babbitt's new marketing policies." 

Lachner's first advertising prescrip- 
tion for Bab-O, Glim, Cameo, Hep, 
and other Babbitt products was a 



WHY HE USES RADIO /TV SPOT 

"Any big company executive who will get out of the board 
room and into the field will see that markets are different." 

"Oakland is not like Oak Park, Biloxi like New Orleans, 
Jersey City like Manhattan in distribution, competition, 
consumer habits, brand images, or profit opportunities." 

"We believe in making our selling as localized as possible 
in particular markets, cities, neighborhoods, and outlets." 

"We like radio and tv spot, and I believe that any station 
operator, should concentrate on knowing his own market 
thoroughly, and telling us things we dont know about it." 



kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



strong dose of spot radio. Later in 
the year, emphasis shifted to tv, and 
other media. For the first nine 
months of 1958, TvB's records show 
that Babbitt spent $950,200 in tv 
spot, and according to Lachner, this 
strong tv emphasis will continue in 
1959. 

The keystone of Babbitt's new mar- 
keting structure, however, is not so 
much its choice of media (Lachner 
believes that every medium has its 
uses for particular products) as it is 
the market-by-market approach, and 
Lachner's deep-rooted conviction that 
"every market is different." 

When he says this you don't get 
the impression that he is mouthing a 
well-worn business cliche, but stating 
a fact borne in on him by more than 
20 years of intensive sales experience 
with Colgate, Macy and Pabst. "You 
just can't understand modern market- 
ing," he says, "by sitting at a desk on 
Madison Avenue, or by looking at 
charts in a big company board room. 
Yoy "ve got to get out in the field and 
s?e fo r yourself. 

"When you do you begin to realize 
tra! distribution, competition, brand 
irmges, consumer habits, and your 
owi! profit opportunities are different 
in evt ; ry single community. Oakland 
is.i'.ot like Oak Park. It is not even 
like San Francisco. Biloxi is differ- 
ent from New Orleans, Portland from 
Los Angeles. There are entirely dif- 
ferent retail patterns in Manhattan 
than in Jersey City just across the 
Hudson River." 

Following this market-by-marke 
thinking, Lachner early in 195! 
staked out 22 prime markets for B. T 
Babbitt products. Later this list wa- 
expanded to 52 which, says Lachner 
account for more than 80% of al 
Babbitt sales. 1959 may see some ex 
pansion of the 52-market concentra! 
tion but "we're committed to a pol 
icy of making our approach localized 
specialized, different from every mai 
ket we're in." 

Two examples of current Babbil 
activity illustrate this personalize 
approach. Last July, the compan 
began its "Buy Three — Ride Free 



34 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 



by market 



promotion in the New York market, 
with purchasers of Bahhitt products 
[offered subway tokens in exchange 
jfor coupons. Redemption of coupons 
fat subway change booths has risen 
Ito the current rate of over 9,000 a 
day. Even more important, says 
Lachner, the campaign won for Bab- 
bitt more than $2 1 /L> million in trace- 
able free publicity, and was a prime 
factor in getting Bab-O, Glim and 
other products new and valuable dis- 
pla\ space on grocers' shelves. 

Similar "Ride Free" promotions 
are being run with localized adapta- 
tions in Boston, Detroit, Philadelphia, 
Cleveland and Cincinnati and Babbitt 
llhas been invited to stage them in 
more than 25 other communities. 

A less spectacular, but equally im- 
portant part of Lachner's market-by - 
I market strategy, is his new plan for 
Babbitt's co-op advertising. To stimu- 
late imagination, and initiative, at 

• :he local level, the company is offer- 
Ijing its accounts an optional plan 
I which will allow them to spend co-op 
I money in their own markets "in any 

way they see fit." No formulas or 
I "strings are attached, though retailers 
nay keep the old plan if they wish. 

For 1958, Babbitt gross sales will 

■un around $20 million. In 1959, 

•ays Lachner, they should increase 

substantially, a rise due in part to the 

j icquisition of Charles Antell, Inc., in 

* December, 1958. Antell's line fea- 
i 'ures Formula 9 hair products, and 
I 'uch candy items as Vita Yums and 

Vita Pops. Lachner has set a five- 
ear sales goal of $60 to $70 million. 
Before coming to Babbitt, Lachner 
I vas for 18 months president of Pabst 
brewing, and previous to that with 
'olgate for 16 years, where he was 
p in charge of the soap division. 
His first job after college, he recalls 
•vith a grin, was with Macy's in New 
ork. "In those depression years, I 
I kas so broke I never spent more than 
dime for lunch. And I could hardly 
lb ml the subway!" 

j Bab-O's "Buy Three-Ride Free" 
promotion is one of the fruits of those 
Un \ memories, and a good measure 
'f Lachner's humaneness. ^ 






PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



35 




To crack N. Y. market, Bardahl's Bill Barclay bears down on tv-merchandising strategy he developed in So. Calif, and Southwest 

Bardahl battles the real 'Big Boys' 



^ In winning $2,225,000 volume, 85% distribution in 
its toughest market, Bardahl had to fight the oil giants 

^ Here's how the oil additive merchandised its tv 
schedule to its competitors in their own gas stations 



I he problem in forcing distribu- 
tion is generally solved once you have 
a foothold alongside the "biggest kid 
on the block." But when the very 
giants you're slugging it out with are 
not only your competitors but the 
marketing vehicle for reaching your 
customers, you're faced with some 
unique problems. 

Bardahl, like the other oil additives 
must wrestle with such brain-twisters. 
While competing with the gasoline and 
oil industry, its main outlets are gas 
stations themselves, many of which are 
owned or franchised by the oil giants. 



Bardahl was one of the first addi- 
tives on the scene. It made a start 
in the northwestern U.S. before the 
war, but had to await the loosening 
up of materials to start doing a job. 
Even with 14 factories throughout the 
world, distribution in 62 foreign mar- 
kets and most of the U.S., the Seattle- 
based company waited almost 10 
years before tackling the New York 
market. 

It looked like certain defeat. Few 
cases were moved in those first three 
years until the spring of 1957 when 
the job was turned over to a man who 



had opened up the Los Angeles mar- 
ket for Bardahl in 1953. He had 
road-tested a tv and marketing strat- 
egy through Arizona, Utah, Idaho. 
Nevada and Southern California with 
tremendous success. 

Bill Barclay took the New York 
City franchise in April of 1957 and 
hired an advertising agency: Riedl 
and Freede, Inc., with offices in New 
York City and Clifton, N. J. Together 
they applied what Bill had learned 
about fighting the oil companies to 
the stand-still point of accepting the 
product alongside their own additives 
and oil products: 

• An ad medium and strategy that 
could be merchandised both to gasi 
station and consumer. 

• A plan for beating your cus- 
tomer-competitor to the advertising 
draw. 

• A scheme for impressing him 
with your advertising. 



36 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY I95i 



• A tight rein on "footballing" "I 
the product to discount sellers. 

• A sales setup strong enough to 
bring it all off. 

Every one of these points formed a 
vital link in the operation for moving 
Bardahl into New York. The me- 
dium was pre-selected. Barclay knew 
what tv could do and had done for 
Bardahl. His early live tv demon- 
strations were part and parcel of the 
product's expansion from 1948. The 
"contraption" Barclay used in that 
:arl\ ground-breaking (see photo op- 
posite) is still a salesman's tool and 
the one actor Pat O'Brien currently 
operates in filmed spots used by Bar- 
dahl in all its markets. (It demon- 
strates Bardahl's friction-free action 
under high pressure.) 

Barclay put Riedl and Freede to 
work with a total ad budget of $18,- 
000 for the initial 13-week test start- 
ing in June '57. "The job was to 
make the 1 iggest impression possible 
all over the map," says a.e. Bob 
Freede. '"It was important to make 
the job we were doing look big to 
both retailers and customers alike." 

"Of course we wanted a male audi- 
ence primarily," he points out. "This 
dictated nighttime buys within obvi- 
ous budget limitations. We'd like to 



have bought some spots in late 
movies to catch service station men 
getting home at night. But the high 
female audience would be wasle cir- 
culation at the consumer level. So we 
concentrated primarily on action-ad- 
venture packages, boxing, wrestling 
and \\hate\er local sports we could 
afford."' 

Into these packages went minute 
and 20-second animated film spots of 
a Dragnet varieh which bad alread) 
been successfully used in other mar- 
kets. They featured a Dick Tracy- 
type character battling such under- 
world characters as "Blacky Carbon," 
"Gummy Rings," "Sticky Valves." 

Part of the strategy was to rotate 
these spots from package to package. 
These rapid moves were designed to 
create an impression of saturation 
that salesmen could take advantage 
of in talking to potential customers. 

Barclay hired an original force of 
18 salesmen to cover the 12.600 sta- 
tions within a 50-mile radius of New 
York Citv. The job ahead of them 
made a direct-type sales operation, 
rather than a less costly distributor 
setup, imperative. 

"Sure, it's more costly, what with 
renting the station wagons, hiring the 
sales force, providing everything 



yourself," Barclay explain-, "hit it's 
the onlj wa\ to make sure ever) ran 
of Bardahl will be merchandised 
properl) . ' 

"Remember." Barcla) emphasizes, 
"your potential customers are also 
your competitors. You can't even 
merchandise to the consumer except 
through the gas stations." 

Here's what had to be done at the 
retailer level: 

l 1 l Merchandising the advertising. 
Every man must have a thorough 
knowledge of the tv campaign. Willi 
major changes every four or five 
weeks, and minor ones weekh. this 
was no snap. The agency prepared 
printed brochures for service stations 
with the tv schedule. Salesmen were 
provided weekly with mimeographed 
changes, which they could also leave 
at the service stations. Primary de- 
\ ice. though, was to "talk it up. 
point to things coming up to give the 
rotation of spots the effect of in- 
creased advertising. 

(2) Achieving point-of-sale. "Mer- 
chandising to the consumer could 
only be done on the pump islands of 
the gas stations themselves," says 
Barclay, "and only consumer demand 
followed up by strong sales effort 
(Please turn to page 72) 



ipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii minimi ii mini will 

HAND-IN-HAND CLIMB OF SALES AND TV EXPENDITURES 

















































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UKLV Wil OCT S? KCS7 (£158 »P« S8 JUNTS8 MIC. 'M OCT 58 Off » 




Sales climb to $2,225,000 is in just about direct ratio to budget increases (now about $350,000). Merchandising is out- 
lined by Riedl & Freede's Bob Freede to M to r) WNTA-TV's Sonny Fields, research dir. Rill Campbell, media dir. Jan Stearns 



. . ii:i.;ii.::.:ii. : . ,;;; ':... .:iiii;:iiiii:.;Miii;;uLN]]i:tii[ii:itiiiJiii[LUi;:;uiii!iii[[ii;ntLL:: : 

SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



37 









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, 





Stepped-up remote schedules called for briefing. Spitzer Ford asst. gen. mgr. Dave Mobbs (1) , KYW's Gerry Wells fill in car salesmen 

J 3 Auto dealers laugh at slump 



^ Spot radio gives dramatic 10-12% sales increase 
in Ohio territories against industry's 20% slump 

^ 50-70 spots a week bring consistent sales pattern, 
dealer identity, strong salesman link to advertising 



get people to showrooms. That meant 
increased excitement to bring them 
in. Individual dealers had to be 
strongly identified. Makes of cars had 
to be singled out. A consistent, rather 
than sporadic sales pattern, had to 
be set from the first." 

Irv Brown, a.e. at Axelband and 
Brown & Associates, Spitzer 's ad 
agency in Cleveland, saw it the same 
way. Four d.j.'s were added to the 
two already at work for Spitzer on 
KYW in Cleveland. Saturday show- 
room remotes were increased to 10 



lo one told Spitzer Motors about 
the recession. At least the strain 
didn't show in their sales figures. 

In 1958, while the industry was 
taking a 20% dive in new car sales, 
Spitzer's 13-dealer organization was 
racking up a 10-12% increase and 
copping No. 1 spot in Ohio. 

The big reasons : stepped-up excite- 
ment and spot schedules by this 
radio-minded distributor. 

"Here's our 1958 sales problem as 
we saw it," says sales director Harold 
Stan. "It was going to be tougher to 



hours. Nighttime radio was added. 

But behind this increase in adver- 
tising activity was a pattern for sell- 
ing that had been worked out step by 
step from May of 1957 when Spitzer 
began its use of radio. 

To help distinguish individual 
dealers, KYW sales manager Ed 
Wallis suggested identification with 
remote broadcasts from the agencies. 
So, in addition to a consistent multi- 
ple spot saturation, Spitzer aired its 
first four-hour broadcast from a 
showroom in June of '57. 

Increased traffic led to more Satur- 
day remotes. Other "individuality" 
factors were stressed. One of these 
was a sales "competition" between 
d.j.'s Joe Finan and Wes Hopkins. 
Finan, plugging Spitzer Ford, and 
Hopkins, pushing Spitzer Dodge, be- 
gan a sales battle. The battle grew in 
proportions, was cross-plugged in 



38 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



newspaper ads. and generally whooped 
up as the cut-off date approached. 
Hopkins, whose car attained its quota 
first, was sent packing to Florida. 
This competition got another go in 
1958 on KYW. 

This time it was split between six 
d.j.'s giving Spitzer two things: (1) 
Greater identification of Spitzer agen- 
cies, (2) Nighttime as well as day- 
time schedules. 

It also thickened the "competitive" 
air among the d.j.'s. Each visited the 
other's location, plugging his site and 
make of car. In these round-robin 
battle royals, "hard sell' was not the 
keynote. In fact, according to sales 
director Stan and the agency, the 
right "Evers-to-Tinker-to-Chance" re- 
lationship between advertising-sales- 
man-sales had been achieved. 

They note that the radio adver- 
tising made people more receptive to 
phone, mail and personal contact by 
salesmen, and radio leads far out- 
distanced those from other sources 
and media. 

During the remotes, salesmen make 
a point of introducing prospects to 
the d.j.'s. It's almost part of the sales 
presentation and, for the listener, is 
another way of linking d.j. and sales- 
man as a single image. 

Ten percent of the Spitzer budget 
goes into newspapers, the remaining 
30', to tv, circulars, handbills. 

At present, the KYW schedule calls 
for 50-70 spots per week, primarily 
minutes, though one week during the 
past year and a half saw 179 minute 
announcements, in addition to the 
Saturday remotes. Currently three 
separate Saturday remotes, totaling 
10 hours, originate from Spitzer 
agencies — 10-12 noon, 12-4 p.m., 4-8 
p.m. Sales director Harold Stan and 
the agency are giving serious thought 
to increasing the remote schedule. 

Advertising increases were, after 
all, Spitzer's method for combatting 
last year's downward trend. Its 10- 
12% sales increase against the indus- 
try's 20% drop is proof enough to 
the 50-year-old company that it's on 
the right track. Consistent sales and 
strong dealer and make identification 
did it, according to Spitzer admen. 
Already using radio as the primary 
medium for dealerships in Little Rock 
and Miami, where sales are also up, 
the firm plans application of these 
techniques in its further expansion 
outside of Ohio. ^ 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



w 



WUdlUKlN U1NUJ1N 



■ uveas pfr|F«r MUiMcEC i|» 1t~*t 

I 



PARTI DAY SALES FIGURES DECEMBER 15TH THROUGH DECEMBER 
31ST. MANITOWOC 0, 0SHK0SH 0, APPLET0N 320, GILLETT 0, 
GREEN BAY 0, MENOMINEE 0, FOND PU LAC 30, STEVENS POINT 
0, WAUSAU 0, NORWAY 0, SHEBOYGAN 0, TOTALING 350 CASES. 
MILWAUKEE SALES SAME PERIOD hlO CASES 
OTTO L. KUEHN CO M W BOWER 



XMAS SLOWS UP TV TEST 



»^arti-Day Toppings, heading into 
their third test month of day tv spots 
in the Green Bay, Wis., area ran 
smack into a typical year-end grocery 
marketing situation in the 15 to 31 
December period. 

Acording to Marvin Bower, mer- 
chandising manager for Parti-Day 
broker Otto L. Kuehn Co. of Milwau- 
kee, only 350 cases were shipped to 
wholesalers in the 80-mile area 
around Green Bay in the last half of 
December. 

Bower attributes Parti-Day's rela- 
tively poor showing to two factors: 
year-end inventory taking by chain 
and other grocery outlets, and the 
featuring of highly seasonal items 
during the Xmas-New Year period. 
Such activities greatly curtailed in- 
store demonstrations and displays of 
Parti-Day, and reflected in a drop in 
shipments. 

On the other hand, Parti-Day de- 
tail men report one unusual, and in a 
sense unexpected development in the 
Green Bay area. For the first time 
they are moving Parti-Day into res- 
taurant and drug store outlets. Hith- 



erto, distribution had been almost ex- 
clusively in chain, supermarkets and 
other types of grocery stores, and al- 
most all sales direct to consumers. 

Retail sales through drug stores is 
complicated by the fact that drug 
store profit margins are higher than 
those in food chains and supermar- 
kets. A can of Parti-Day in grocery 
outlets retails for 49^; drug outlets 
want to price it at 58^ to 60^. A 
similar situation faces any product 
seeking dual distribution. 

Whether or not per-ser\ ing sales of 
Parti-Day will ever become a factor 
in the total topping picture remains 
to be seen. Meanwhile, Otto L. Kuehn 
is gathering information on similar 
distribution of Parti-Day in other 
test markets. #* 



The test inja nutshell: Product: 
Parti-Day Toppings. Market: 80-mile 
area around Green Ba\ . \\ is. Media : 
Day tv spots only. Schedule: 10 
spots weekly. Length : 26 weeks from 
15 Oct. Commercials: Live, one-min- 
ute. Budget: $9,980 complete. 



ai ni it mi inn mil i n ii mil in i mil minimi minium mill mi iniimi minnmii nmiiiiiiimiiinimnimiii e 




SALES BOX SCORE 



Oct 580 cases 

Nov 1,450 cases 

Nov 370 cases 

Dec 1,090 cases 



Shipments to wholesalers in Green 
l!.i\. Wis. area since start of tv test 



Siiiinnnni i i urn im imiiimmi i mi 111 i nun mi in urn nniiiiiiniiinnminiii nnmiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi mini nunc 



39 



How stations rate "rep" services 



^ New SPONSOR survey shows stations differ widely 
in evaluating 42 service activities by representatives 

^ 218 stations place sales, rate, research services 

and "unimportants" 



first, specify both 

W hat do radio and tv stations 
think of the mushrooming number of 
services now being performed by na- 
tional representatives? Are they realK 
important? Are they truly valuable? 

To get the answers to such ques- 
tions. SPONSOR recently conducted one 
of the most comprehensive surveys 
ever made on station-representative 
relationships. 

Over 900 questionnaires were sent 
to radio and tv stations throughout 
the country. Two-hundred eighteen 
busy station men took the trouble to 
sit down and write out thorough and 
thoughtful replies — an unusually high 
return, considering the complexity of 
the questionnaire and the pressures 
of the season. 

The services listed in the Sponsor 
questionnaire were compiled on the 
basis of information from a number 
of national representative firms in 
various categories. Obviously the 
complete list cannot be taken as a 
lineup of services which any station 



"musts" 



may be expected to receive. No one 
representative offers all these services 
— nor should he be expected to. Some 
services listed may have been per- 
formed only once, by one representa- 
tive, for one station. Others may 
never have been performed at all. 

In station ranks there are many 
differences of opinion on how much 
the representative should be involved 
in station operation. A very vocal 
group — and this includes some top 
stations, feels that representatives may 
have gone beyond the call of duty, 
and are encroaching on what should 
be purely station functions. 

Evidence of high station interest 
in the subject is shown by the fact 
that nearly all stations answered all 
the questions. The least number of 
answers for any one question was 
187, showing the interest extended 
throughout. And many who replied 
added important and candid side re- 
marks at the bottom of the question- 
naire. 



pilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfflW 

lO MOST WANTED* SERVICES 

'• Maintain close contact on availabilities, programs 

2- Update sales aids as soon as new material available 

3. Compile and package station info for the salesman 

4. Prepare specific presentations for specific accounts 

5- Compile fact sheets, station info, for station profile 

6- Prepare general presentation on behalf of market 
7. Advise station on mood of buyers and market 

8- Analyze rate structures periodically 
9. Recommend type and time of audience surveys 
10. Maintain agency-advertiser lists for station mailings 

*But some very important stations want no services. 



From their answers, it is clear that 
the stations overwhelmingly believe 
that the primary function of the rep- 
resentative is sales. But opinion 
varies widely on what additional 
types of activities a representative 
should engage in. 

The 10 services most valued by 
the largest number of stations are 
shown in the adjoining box. 

At the other end of the scale is a 
list of the 10 services which these sta- 
tions considered the least important. 
I Numbers in parenthesis indicate 
number of stations voting) : 

1. Negotiate for the purchase of 
surveys by the station (125) 

2. Handle billing and collections 
from the agencies (98) 

3. Advise on network contract 
negotiations and network station 
strategy (87) 

4. Recommend personnel special- 
ists for the station staff (78) 

5. Aid in preparation of station 
presentation for contests, awards (77) 

6. Help in details of executing pro- 
gram for clients (59) 

7. Plan merchandising program 
for clients (59) 

8. Counsel in advertising themes 
and layout (55) 

9. Advise station on trade books 
to be used (47) 

10. Send out station mailings to 
national and regional prospects (46) 

In weighing the relative values 
placed on the representative services, 
it should not be forgotten that this 
can vary widely with the situation 
and problems of the individual sta- 
tion. Size of market is one of the 
obvious factors which has influenced 
some answers. 

Although asked to indicate market 
size, not all respondents included this 
information. Here is a tabulation of 
the 183 stations who furnished data: 

Under 25,000 ... 2 

25.000-50,000 ... 7 

50,000-100,000 ... 16 

100,000-200,000 ... 42 

200,000-400,000 ... 54 

400,000-600,000 ... 28 

600,000-1,000,000 ... 24 

1,000,000-3,000,000 ... 25 

Over 3,000,000 ... 13 



40 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



llllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllM 



llllllilllllllllll 



BOX SCORE OF 218 BROADCAST STATION VOTES 



ADVERTISING & PROMOTION Must fr 

— — — — — ^ ^^—— — ^^— — ^— ^— Very Important Important 

1. Advise on trade paper and local consumer advertising 38 62 

2. Advise station on trade books to be used 37 57 

3. Help plan audience and trade promotion strategy 50 52 

4. Counsel on advertising themes, layout 33 45 

5. Help plan press functions, agency group presentations, etc 68 44 

6. Aid in preparation of presentations for contests, awards 23 36 

7. Plan new station debuts 42 44 

8. Spearhead total-market promos when needed to bolster sales 63 51 

MANAGEMENT 

1. Advise on network contract negotiations and strategy 31 36 

2. Recommend personnel specialists for station staff 23 26 

3. Suggest operational revisions apropos more sales 87 58 

PROGRAMING 

1. Give program recommendations to hypo audience and ratings .... 87 46 

2. Counsel on program balance and personalities 68 41 

3. Check competitive program schedules regularly 94 38 

PUBLICITY-MERCHANDISING 

1. Advise on consumer and trade publicity program 28 59 

2. Help in placement of national stories 45 52 

3. Plan merchandising program for clients 30 43 

4. Help in executing merchandising program details (premiums, etc.) 20 38 

RATES 

1. Analyze rate structure periodically 135 44 

2. Advise on establishment of special packages for clients 125 41 

3. Determine audience and impression costs 121 38 



Good 


Unimportant 


64 


44 


67 


47 


74 


32 


69 


55 


61 


39 


61 


77 


52 


53 


55 


27 



43 


87 


75 


78 


49 


16 



52 


26 


59 


34 


38 


35 



72 


43 


61 


42 


72 


59 


65 


71 



26 


6 


29 


14 


32 


18 



Figures show number of stations evaluating each category. 



ilfil!lli!llllllll« 



mi iiiniiiniiiiKr 



Thus, 90 stations or almost half of 
those replying represented large mar- 
ket areas of more than 400,000 peo- 
ple. Persons answering the question- 
naire are affiliated with 129 tv sta- 
tions and/or 139 radio stations. Some 
of the respondents, of course, are 
executives of both. 

Market size as a factor influencing 
answers was pointed out in several 
comments from the stations. Wm. R. 
Holman, sales promotion manager, 
WBBM Chicago, wrote, "For in- 
stance, a market presentation is not 
as important to me here as it would 
be in a smaller market. Also the size 



of the staff makes it easier for us to 
do many things that could be done by 
our reps if it were necessary." In the 
same vein, John A. Schneider, 
WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, says, "A 
big station in a big market needs 
fewer aids." 

However, as the services listed 
show, a multiplicity of aids often is 
expected. Support is taken for granted 
in many cases in sales development, 
national promotion, research . . . 
even in audience promotion and net- 
work and trade press relations. 

This tendency to over-all reliance 
on the services of representatives was 



considered disturbing by some re- 
sponding stations. 

Bob McAndrews. v. p. at KBIG, 
Avalon, Calif., comments as follows: 
Most of my check marks are in the 
far right columns because I feel that 
most of the activities you list are the 
responsibility of the station. We like 
to think our rep is too busy with 
face-to-face selling and the prelimi- 
nary research-promotion analysis 
which each contact demands, to have 
time or personnel for all the other 
facets." 

Many representatives tend to go 
along with this. Their criterion is 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



41 



BOX SCORE OF 218 BROADCAST STATION VOTES (cont'd) 



RESEARCH "Must"& 
Very Important Important 

1. Recommend type and timing of audience surveys 132 46 

2. Compile analyses of survey results for sales contact, mailings 123 48 

3. Guide design and preparation of coverage maps 74 37 

4. Conduct continuous competitive media info as sales ammunition 104 54 

5. Maintain updated compet. station info every operation phase Ill 40 

6. Keep updated set count (when applicable) 85 41 

7. Negotiate for the purchase of surveys by the station 15 17 

SALES DEVELOPMENT -SALES PROMOTION 

1. Prepare general presentation on behalf of market 150 39 

2. Prepare specific presentations for specific accounts 170 27 

3. Compile fact sheets, station info for station profile 151 32 

4. Maintain agency-advertiser lists for station mailings 129 35 

5. Send station mailings to national and regional prospects 59 33 

6. Send regular representative firm mailings to prospects 74 43 

7. Prepare and issue material on the value of spot 115 45 

8. Conduct trade press campaign to sell medium to prospects 76 49 

9. Attend meetings of important prospects 96 48 

SALES SERVICE 

1. Maintain station contact: availabilities, new program info etc 193 11 

2. Compile and package station info for the salesmen 177 16 

3. Update sales aids as soon as new material is available 186 18 

4. Handle billing and collections from agencies 50 20 

5. Advise station on mood of buyers and market 145 37 

Figures show number of stations evaluating each category. 



Cood 


Unimportant 


32 


8 


28 


14 


48 


41 


38 


9 


41 


17 


34 


40 


30 


125 



14 


5 


12 


1 


18 


12 


34 


9 


58 


46 


57 


29 


35 


14 


65 


18 


39 


14 



10 


> ... 


11 


3 


7 


1 


26 


98 


26 


7 



that the services most closely allied 
to sales are the most necessary to 
perform. The representative operates 
at a national and regional level, and 
he feels the corollary functions of his 
selling should similarily be at na- 
tional and regional levels. Though 
they oblige when called upon for such 
services as advice on ad layouts, the 
general opinion is that matters of this 
class should be handled by the sta- 
tion's own promotion and publicity 
people or the local ad agency. Though 
there were exceptions, the thinking 
of the majority of stations seems in 
agreement. 

"Representatives should participate 
fully in the sale of the station, but 
never in day-by-day management," 
says Robert J. Mcintosh, station man- 
ager of WWJ, Detroit, Michigan. 



And J. R. Covington, v.p. WBT, 
WBTV, Charlotte, N. C, is even more 
succinct: "Advice and counsel in 
every appropriate field is important, 
but subordinate to selling." 

Closer contact between agency and 
representative as the necessary basis 
for any services was frequently men- 
tioned. "Constant contact with all 
salesmen of reps is paramount," ac- 
cording to Leslie L. Kennon, v.p. 
KWTO Springfield, Mo. And Don 
White, National Sales Manager, 
WBNS Columbus, Ohio, adds "I be- 
lieve the rep and station are part- 
ners and should aid each other to 
benefit each group with the other's 
experience." 

Recognition of the need for a two- 
way flow of information was shown 
in many of the comments received. 



"Stations must provide reps 'on the 
scene information' and do their share 
of work to wrap up new accounts. 
Total media responsibility is not the 
rep's alone. A rep is a key man on 
station sales staff and he needs in- 
formation," says Sterling E. Zimmer- 
mann, general manager KUNO, Cor- 
pus Christi, Texas." 

Herman Livingston, station man- 
ager, KILO, Grand Forks, N. D. is 
more specific. "One point I have al- 
ways felt strongly about, which I 
don't believe was mentioned in this 
survey, and that is the rep keep the 
station posted about campaigns. The 
stations should be constantly digging 
this info out, but a timely tip from 
the rep who has a lead on a national 
spot campaign can help both the sta- 
( Please turn to page 70) 



42 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



'Hybrid' commercials test the best 



^ Schwerin research shows combination of live action 
and animation generally better than either used alone 

^ Yet 89% of all tv commercials were live action in 
1958, a rise of 6% over 1955 despite lowered impact 



prefer. Last year's favorite type was 
live action, accounting for 89% of 
all network commercials. The "hy- 
brid" commercial was only one-tenth 
as popular — accounting for only 3% 
of all commercials. 

Paradoxically, there's also a trend 
away from the "hybrid" commercial. 
In other words, the commercial type 
that has the best chances of efficiency 
is being overlooked more and more. 

In 1955, for example, the "hybrid" 
commercial's share of the industry 
was 60% higher than in 1958. Four 
years ago, one out of eight commer- 
cials was of the "hybrid" type; but 
last year, only one in 12 commercials 
combined live action with animation. 

An explanation for this apparent 
contradiction may be that in 1955 
live action commercials were the most 
efficient type, and the habit of making 



; 



^%lthough tens of millions of dol- 
lars were spent on making commer- 
cials in 1958. surprisingly little was 
spent to either test commercials that 
were aired — or to pre-test commer- 
cials before they were produced. 

Last year saw the greatest growth 
of live action to date, with action 
and demonstration dominating close 
to nine out of 10 commercials; only 
11% of 1958's commercials were esti- 
mated to have used animation. 

There is some tendency to think 
about live action and animation in 
either/or terms. Yet according to a 
Schwerin study based on some 350 
tv commercials aired in 1958 the 
most effective were the "hybrid" com- 
mercials combining both live action 
and animation. 

Here's what Schwerin discovered: 

• The average "hybrid" commer- 
cial in 1958 was almost twice as ef- 
fective as the average live-action 
commercial. 

• The "hybrid" commercial also 
scored in effectiveness several times 
higher than the animated commercial. 

These conclusions are based on 
Schwerin's competitive preference 
measurements (see chart) which 
measure audience desire for a prod- 
uct before exposure to the commer- 
cial and then again after exposure. 
Under test conditions described be- 
low, Schwerin scores commercials on 
their ability to increase an audience's 
wants for a particular product. 

Last year, "hybrid" commercials 
averaged a score of 15.6, while live 
action commercials averaged 8.2 and 
straight animation earned onlv 1.1 
I Note: the small size of the anima- 
tion sample may render this figure 
insignificant.) 

What's interesting is this: while 
Schwerin regards the "hybrid" com- 
mercial as the most efficient type, it is 
not the type that agencies and clients 



commercials in pure live action has 
been perpetuated. 

According to Schwerin studies of 
commercial effectiveness in 1055. 
live action commercials led with a 
competitive preference ineasiiremenl 
of 11.3, followed b\ animated com- 
mercials with 7.4, while the "hybrid" 
commercial lagged with 6.1. 

// these studies are valid, then com- 
mercials now are being produced ac- 
cording to a point of view that was 
good four years ago, but no longer 
applies today. 

And what's equalh important is 
that from 1955 to 1958. several new- 
production techniques were intro- 
duced which made the combination 
of live action and animation far 
simpler for simultaneous use in the 
same scene: rotoscope, infra-red proc- 
ess and aerial image systems. 

But a word of caution about one 
l\pe of commercial versus another is 
in order. "Let me make it clear that 
Schwerin does not advocate the hv- 
brid live-plus- animation approach as 
a panacea or preferred technique," 
warns John V. Roberts, senior writ- 
er/analyst for Schwerin Research 
{Please turn to page 48) 



TESTS SHOW CHANGED IMPACT 



CZD 



1955 



= 1958 



11.3 






LIVE-ACTION 



LIVE & ANIMATION 



ANIMATION 



INDEX: Schwerin Research Corp. Competitive Preference Measurements. 
•Animation sample may be too small to be significant. 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



43 



WHEELING 

37; TV 

MARKET 

"■Television Magazine 8/1/58 

One Station Sells Big 
Booming Ohio Valley 




Pacemaker of progress is the Titanium 
Metals Corporation of America. Its To- 
ronto, Ohio, plant— in the WTRF-TV area 
— is the world's first plant designed and 
instrumented specifically for rolling and 
forging Titanium mill shapes. The highly 
skilled employees of TMCA at Toronto 
are more reasons why the WTRF-TV mar- 
ket is a super market for alert advertisers 
... a market of 425,196 TV homes, where 
2 million people have a spendable income 
of $2 l /2 billion annually. 

For complete merchandising service and 
availabilities, call Bob Ferguson, VP 
and General Mgr., at CEdar 2-7777. 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Company 



lit rf Iw 



Wheeling 7, West Vo.^^ 

316,000 watts NBC ne,work color 




National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 






TV BUYS 

Stephan Distributing Co., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., is planning a 
campaign in 16 major markets for its hair tonic. Buying is not yet 
completed, but spots will be on film, and minutes will be used pri- 
marily. Frequency will depend upon the market. The buyer is Steve 
Semons; the agency, Cunningham & Walsh, New York. 

Peter Paul, Inc., Naugatuck, Conn., is kicking off a campaign in 
top markets for its Peter Paul Mounds. The schedules start this 
month, run for 12 weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks during night- 
time slots are being purchased. Frequency depends upon the market. 
The buyers are Herb Werman and Jim Kearns; the agency is Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., New York. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, 0. is extending its campaign 
into 10 additional markets for its Duncan Hines cake mixes. The new 
schedules began 5 January, will run for 52 weeks. 20's will be used 
in nighttime segments only. Frequency will vary according to the 
market. The buyer is Joe Burbeck; the agency is Compton Adver- 
tising, Inc., New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

C. La Rosa & Sons, Brooklyn, N. Y., has scheduled a campaign to 
promote their macaroni products. New campaign will kick off 15 
January. Frequency will depend upon the market, will vary from 
market to market. Minutes, 10's and participations are being slotted 
for daytime and nighttime periods. The buyer is Vince Daraio; the 
agency is Hicks & Greist, New York. 

Sterling Silversmith Guild of America, New York, is scheduling 
a campaign to promote the use of sterling in the top 40 markets. 
The campaign kicks off 19 January, will run alternate weeks for 30 
weeks. Minute e.t.s are being used. Frequency will vary from mar- 
ket to market. The buyer is Bernie Basmussen ; the agency is Fuller 
& Smith & Boss, New York. 

Duffy-Mott Co., Inc., New York, is entering major markets to push 
its Clapps Baby Food. The 10-week campaign starts this month. 
Minutes during daytime periods are being used; frequency depends 
upon the market. The buyer is Steve Suren; the agency is Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc., New York. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., New York, is going into various 
markets for its Oasis Menthol cigarettes. The schedules kick off 
this month, run for eight to 20 weeks, depending upon the market. 
Frequencies vary from market to market. Minutes during both day- 
time and nighttime segments are being aired. The buyer is Virginia 
Conway; the agency is McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York. 



44 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 










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> At all times, NBC's HOT 
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■ NBC News is constantly at 
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This is the kind of news-coverage 
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"PULSE— Feb., 1958 



DENVER - CONTACT YOUR AVERY-KNODEL MAN 



TV STILL GOES THATAWAY 

(Cont'd from page 33) 

Networks and producers anticipate 
this, too, since it happens every year. 
They are readying some new ones. 

At ABC TV, for example, a new 
half-hour show titled Alcoa Presents 
begins on Tuesday, 20 January at 
10 p.m. This is a Collier Young pro- 
duction which originally was to be 
titled One Step Beyond. Sometime 
this spring, the same network will 
debut an adventure series called The 
Alaskan, certainly a timely title in 
view of our 49th state. 

On NBC TV. the new Jack Webb- 
produced D.A.'s Man has already 
made its debut, will be seen weekly 
on Saturdays at 10:30 p.m. Music 
Show Starring Buddy Bregman starts 
Sunday, 11 January in the 7:30 p.m. 
slot on the same network. During 
this spring NBC TV will carry four 
special musical shows as the Tele- 
phone Hour. 

At CBS TV, one new show 7 is 
already on, another coming up soon. 
Rawhide, an hour-long Western pro- 
duced by Charles Marquis Warren 
took over in the Friday 8 to 9 p.m. 
slot on 2 January, replacing Jackie 
Gleason. Starting 15 February, the 
network will introduce a half-hour 
mystery-detective stanza titled Rich- 
ard Diamond, Private Detective to 
take over on Sunday nights at 10. 

Meanwhile, the film producers are 
busy on the coast developing or 
getting set to develop new properties 
in anticipation of still more casualties 
in the current network tv lineup. 
Script-buying is active, and a num- 
ber of producers are even going 
ahead beyond pilot films into actual 
production. 

Of course, there are some actual 
commitments spurring the activity. A 
large Amoco regional deal with CBS 
Film has already prompted producer 
Sam Gallu into purchasing scripts for 
the series Border Patrol. Syndication 
possibilities are also resulting in work 
on such properties as Stake-Out at 
Screen Gems, Bold Venture and Lock- 
Out at Ziv, Third Man series at NTA, 
The Veil at Hal Roach studios for 
NTA, and Fate by Gross-Krasne- 
Sillerman productions. 

Other shows at the point of script- 
ing or production are Peck's Bad 
Girl, a taped series for CBS TV, Town 
Tamer by Don Fedderson, Man of 
The House by Peter Lawford. ^ 



46 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 





THE NBC 
RADIO NETWORK 

is on the spot— whatever the 
season, whatever the sport - 
bringing America one exciting 
first-hand report after another. 
Baseball and boxing, tennis and 
track, horse-racing, sailboat-rac- 
ing, golf -even bocchi- they're 
all part of the jampacked NBC 
schedule. Each season there are 
specials like: the Rose Bowl 
Game, the World Series, the 
U. S. Open Golf Tournament, 
Forest Hills' Tennis Champion- 
ships, in fact, just about even- 
major event of the year. Week- 
end games and special features 
on monitor, interviews, sports 
roundups, and the Friday night 
fights complete the schedule. 

For sports-loving America, 
here's week-in, week-out on-the- 
spot reporting that only a net- 
work could provide. 

For complete on-the-spot cover- 
age, all year long, around the 
world, America turns to the sta- 
tions of the NBC Radio Network 



'HYBRID' COMMERCIALS 

( Cont'd from page 43 ) 

Corp. "We would not be able to rec- 
ommend one technique over the oth- 
er. These results are not based on 
structured tests in which the same 
commercial is tested in two versions. 
They are all based on statistical aver- 
ages, and are subject to all the reser- 
vations one can make about mixing 
apples and oranges in data." 

However, Roberts observed: "Yet 
the so-called 'hybrid' commercials 
scored some outstanding successes in 
1958." 

What are some familiar examples 
of what is meant by the "hybrid" 
commercial? 

A familiar use is for the remedy 
formula, where an animated section 
within a live-action opening and clos- 
ing illustrates the reasons why. 

Everyone recalls the commercials 
of Anacin, Bufferin and many other 
products starting with a live subject 
with a complaint, going on to an ani- 
mated "plumbing" sequence of the 
human body, and returning to the 
live subject who has obtained relief. 

This type of commercial is so fa- 
miliar as to raise a smile along Madi- 



son Avenue — yet it is one of the few 
product groups that have shown a 
steady increase in commercial effec- 
tiveness in Schwerin tests. 

This kind of commercial is a "hy- 
brid" type using the hard sell, and 
there are also hybrid examples using 
the opposite approach, the soft sell, 
where animation is added to live 
action for its pleasure and entertain- 
ment values. 

Pet Milk commercials are an ex- 
ample of this. For several years, Pet 
used a series of live action commer- 
cials presenting recipes and featuring 
appealing close-ups of food. Then 
Pet became aware of Schwerin stud- 
ies on the "hybrid" type of commer- 
cial and tried a new campaign that 
integrated UPA-produced cartoons 
with live action. Subsequent Schwer- 
in tests showed an increase in effec- 
tiveness that also gave Pet an edge 
on the commercials of competing 
brands. 

Scott Tissue is another product 
that discovered the advantages of the 
"hybrid" commercial. When high- 
style, wash drawings were added to 
their formerly all-live commercials, 
an immediate result was added effec- 
tiveness. Scott subsequently applied 



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the "hybrid" formula to a number 
of other commercial campaigns, and 
was able to retain the added measure 
of preference. 

A natural question, in view of these 
successes with the "hybrid" commer- 
cials, is this: Why don't more adver- 
tisers try to combine live action with 
animation? 

Four reasons why animation has 
been overlooked are given by John 
Roberts: "First, there has been a 
trend away from animation, occa- 
sioned by disillusion over the less 
than perfect imitators of the UPA 
pioneers. Second, animation is in 
itself a more costly process than live 
action. Third, the reaction against 
animation has been fed by the hard 
sell philosophy that followed in the 
wake of the late recession. This feel- 
ing might be summarized as the 
'You-can't-sell-cars-with-cartoon-cats' 
school of thought." 

Briefly, the method used by 
Schwerin in testing commercials is 
to measure audience desire for a 
specific brand both before and after 
exposure to a commercial for the 
product. The increased preference 
after exposure to the commercial is 
measured, and this score is the basis 
of the charts shown (page 43). 

Known as the Competitive Prefer- 
ence Test, the method used by 
Schwerin begins with an audience 
of 350 selected by direct mail. A de- 
tailed questionnaire establishes the 
standard characteristics of the audi- 
ence: sex, age, education, rental 
group and other factors. 

Then a list of leading brands of a 
particular product is presented and 
the subjects are asked to select which 
brand they would prefer if they were 
to win the drawing that follows. A 
kinescope program is then shown con- 
taining commercials of the brand 
being tested. A second list of brands 
is then presented with preferences 
called for again. 

The basis of the test is a compari- 
son of results before and after ex- 
posure to the commercials. It is not 
important whether this preference 
range is high or low, since this is 
largely an indication of the brand's 
share of market. What is important 
is the difference measured between 
the first test and the second test. This 
difference is expressed in numbers as 
a Competitive Preference Measure- 
ment. ^ 



4£ 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 




THE NBC 
RADIO NETWORK 

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Russia. For four consecutive 
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hour-and-a-half each night, 
image Russia is exploring every 
aspect of Soviet life. Listeners 
hear the actual voices of Russia's 
leaders, of people who have 
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formed conclusions of their own. 

Through special broadcasts like 
image Russia, and regularly- 
scheduled programs like night- 
line, monitor, meet the press, 
and the national farm and 
home hour, NBC Radio keeps 
America informed. In 1958 
alone, NBC audiences heard: 

Secretary of Agriculture Benson 
on farm problems. Nehru on the 
8th anniversary of the Indian 
Republic. Senator John Ken- 
nedy on education. Vice Presi- 
dent Nixon on his South Ameri- 
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Africa's newest country. 

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II r 



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RATINGS: TOP SPOl 



Top 10 shows in 10 markets 
Period: 5-12 November, 1958 

TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 



Highway Patrol 

ii v I Adventure I 



Sea Hunt 

ii v (Adventure I 



Death Valley Days 

us. borax (Western) 



Sheriff of Cochise 

nta (Western) 



Silent Service 

cnp (Adventure) 



Whirlybirds 

cbs (Adventure) 



Twenty-Six Men 

abc (Western) 



State Trooper 

mca (Adventure) 



Mike Hammer 

mca (Mystery) 



MacKenzie's Raiders 

*iv (Western) 



National 
average 



21.5 



19.1 



18.9 



17.1 



16.7 



16.5 



16.4 



15.8 



15.5 



14.8 



7-STATI0N 
MARKETS 



16.8 12.2 

urca-tv kttv 
7 :00pm 9:00pm 



34.3 12.4 

wcbs-tv krca-tv 
10:30pm 10:00pm 



11.2 12.9 

urca-tv krca-tv 
7:00pm 7:00pm 



6.3 13.4 

wnew-tv kttv 
00pm 8:30pm 



3.7 11.2 

wpix-tv krca-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 



2.2 9.7 

wpix-tv khj-tv 
S :00pm 7:30pm 



10.9 

krca-tv 
7:00pm 



11.3 5.9 

wrca-tv khj-tv 
10:30pm 8:00pm 



18.4 13.2 

wrca-tv krca-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 



5.3 10.9 

wcbs-tv kttv 
7:30pm 8:00pm 



6-STA. 
MARKET 



21.5 

kron-tv 
6:30pm 



23.9 

kron-tv 
7 :00pm 



6.5 

ktuv-tv 
7 :30pm 



11.5 

kron - tv 
7:00pm 



9.5 

ktuv-tv 
7:00pra 



12.5 

kgo-tv 
9:00pm 



17.2 

kron-tv 
10:30pm 



16.2 

kpix-tv 
10:00pm 



5-STA. 
MARKET 



25.2 

komo-tv 
7:00pm 



13.4 

king-tv 

in mi 



24.5 

king-tv 
: 00pm 



28.0 

king-tv 
7:00pm 



4.5 

ktnt-tv 
7 :30pm 



13.2 

komo-tv 
7:ii0pm 



6.5 

ktnt-tv 
8 :30pm 



21.5 

king-tv 
9:00pm 



16.2 

komo-tv 

i: : 



4-STATION MARKETS 



Chicago Detroit Milw. Mnpls. Phila. Wash. 



13.9 24.2 19.9 23.7 16.5 17.5 

wgn-tv wjbk-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv uirv-tv WtUp-tV 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 



27.8 13.5 7.9 11.5 8.9 

wjbk-tv wisn-tv wtcn-tv wcau-tv wmal-tv 
10:30pm 9:00pm 9:00pm 7:30pm 10:00pm 



9.2 17.9 10.2 29.0 15.5 16.5 

wgn-tv wwj-tv wisn-tv wcco-tv wrcv-tv wrc-tv 

9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



7.5 13.0 

cklw-tv wisn-tv 
10:30pm 9:00pm 



11.9 17.9 

wcau-tv wrc-tv 
6:30pm 7:00pm 



14.5 

wnbq-tv 
9:30pm 



12.5 17.9 

wfil-tv wmal-tv 
6 :30pm 7 :00pm 



12.2 

wgn-tv 
9:00pm 



29.5 19.5 8.2 10.5 



wtmj-tv 
9:30pm 



kstp-tv wcau-tv wttg-tv 
9 :30pm 1 :00pm 7 :00pm 



14.9 17.9 11.5 6.9 16.2 15.2 

wgn-tv wxyz-tv wisn-tv wtcn-tv wrcv-tv wmal-tv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 9:00pm 3:00pm 7:00pm 6:30pm 



8.9 6.5 27.2 20.5 14.9 8.9 

wgn-tv cklw-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv wrcv-tv wmal-tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 



15.5 7.5 

wgn-tv cklw-tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 



10.0 15.2 14.5 

WCCO-tV wcau-tv wrc-tv 
10:30pm 8:00pm 10:30pm 



20.2 14.9 7.2 16.0 11.5 11.5 

wnbq-tv wxyz-tv wisn-tv kstp-tv wrcv-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 7:30pm 



Atlanta Bait. 



24.5 20.3 1 

waga-tv wmar-tv wll 
9:00pm 7:00pm 7 | 



13.7 17.8 lit 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wlM 
10:30pm 10:30pm loL 



23.8 1 

wjz-tv w 
7:3pm 10 



24.9 

wsb-tv 
7:00pm 



12.8 22 

wbal-tv we 
10:30pm 7,u 
I 



29.5 13.8 1 



wsb-tv wjz-tv 
7:00pm 8:00pm 



12.2 
wlw-a 
7:00pm 



12 



15.8 It 



wbal-tv 
10:30pm 1C 



6.3 

w hv - a 
11:00pm 



l 

Tm 



9.3 



bal-tv wb 
:00pm 61 



Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 












_ 


U. S. Marshall 

nta (Western) 


16.3 


15.3 12.7 

wrca-tv kttv 
10:30pm 7:00pm 


13.5 

kron-tv 

7 :00pm 




12.2 12.4 

ubkb-tv kstp-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 






Rescue 8 

screen gems (Adventure) 


14.7 


7.4 

krca-tv 
7:00pm 


11.2 

kron-tv 
6 :30pm 


23.5 

king-tv 

7:30pm 




1 
\ 
7 


.5 

•PC 


Cray Chost 

cbs (Adventure) 


13.8 


2.7 

wpix-tv 
li :30pm 






4.9 

wgn-tv 

9:00pm 


9.7 7.3 J 

waga-tv wjz-tv 9 
7 :30pm 9 :30pm 7 


5 


Patti Page 

screen gems (Musical) 


13.8 




2.3 

ktuv-tv 
10:00pm 






' 


7 


Citizen Soldier 

flamingo (Adventure) 


13.6 


8.7 

kttv 

7 :30pm 


9.5 

kgo-tv 
9 :30pm 


15.7 

king-tv 
7:00pm 


14.2 18.2 

wnbq-tv wton tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 


1 


2 


Dr. Hudson 

mca (Drama) 


13.1 


6.3 

kttv 
9:30pm 


12.0 

kron-tv 
10:30pm 


4.7 

ktnt-tv 
8:30pm 


16.7 6.5 

wwj-tv witi-tv 
10:30pm 5:30pm 




.2 


Jim Bowie 

abc (Western) 


12.6 


4.2 

vnew-tv 
10:00pm 






5.5 15.2 12.9 

kmsp-tv wrcv-tv wttg-tv 
8:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 


13.5 

wjz-tv 
.3 :00pm 




Colonel Flack 

cbs (Mystery) 


12.5 


0.9 5.4 

wpix-tv kttv 
9:00pm 8:00pm 






14.2 

wrc-tv 
10:30pm 






Big Story 

flamingo (Drama) 


12.0 


2.8 3.2 

wnew-tv ktla-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 


11.9 

kron-tv 
6:30pm 




9.2 11.5 

wjbk-tv wttg-tv 
7:00pm 10:30pm 


32.2 

waga-tv 
m 80pm 




Frontier 

cnp (Western) 


12.0 




7.2 

kgo-tv 




6.5 7.9 9.2 

wnbq-tv wwj-tv witi-tv 
6:00pm 4:30pm 5:00pm 




— 


Films listed are syndicated, V* hr., Vz hr. an 
space indicates film not broadcast in this ma 
lesser extent with syndicated shows. This si 


d hr. length, telecast in four or more markets The average rating is an unweighted average of individual market ratings listed 

-ket 5-12 Nov. While network shows are fairly stable from one month to anothn in markets in which they are shown, this is true tt 

ould be bome in mind when analyzing rating t ends from one month to another In this chart. If blank, show was not rated at all 

■ 1 


1 



FILM SHOWS 



3-8TATION MARKETS 



Cleve. Columbus New Or. St. Louis 



14.2 19.5 24.9 25.7 

wiw-tv wbns-tv wdsu-tv ksd-tv 
8:00pm 8:30pm 10:00pm 9:30pm 



19.5 29.2 30.5 17.9 

kJ« tv wbns-tv wdsu-tv ktvl-tv 
; 00pm 7:30pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 



17.2 24.2 

kvu iv wbns-tv 
10:30pm 9:30pm 



30.9 

kmox-tv 

9:30pm 

25.5 15.5 



HWl-tV 

9 :30pm 



ktvl-tv 
9:30pm 



19.5 

"wjw-tv 

10:30pm 



9.4 

wdsu - tv 
3 :00pm 



18.2 26.5 18.5 

wtvn-tv wdsu-tv ksd-tv 
7:00pm 10 :00pm 9:30pm 



14.9 12.9 

uews-tv wlw-c 
6:00pm 10:30pm 



11.9 17.9 20.5 17.5 



kyw-tv 

11 :30pm 



wtvn-tv wdsu-tv ksd-tv 
7:00pm 10:00pm 9:30pm 



11.4 18.9 22.9 

wtvn-tv wwl-tv ksd-tv 
10:30pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 



10.9 14.2 12.5 

wjw-tv wbns-tv wwl-tv 
7:30pm 7:30pm 10:OOpm 



17.2 

ksd-tv 
10:00pm 



18.2 16.9 

wwl-tv ksd-tv 
fi :30pm 9:30pm 



18.5 

wbns-tv 

7:30pm ' 



11.7 

ksd-tv 
10:45pm 



14.5 

wwl-tv 
10:00pm 



16.2 

wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 



8.9 

kyw-tv 
7 :30pm 



24.5 14.2 

wdsu-tv ksd-tv 

:30pm 9 :30pm 



23.5 

Urisil tV 

:30pm 



2-STATION MARKETS 



Birm. Buffalo Dayton Prov 



36.8 23.0 29.3 17.3 

wbrc-tv wgr-tv whio-tv wjar tv 
9:30pm 10 :30pm s :30pm 10:80pm 



31.8 15.5 18.3 24.3 

wbrc-tv wgr-tv wlw-d wpro-tv 
9:30pm 3:30pm 10 :30pm 10:30pm 



22.9 24.3 28.8 



wben-tv wlw-d 
7:00pm 7:00pm 



wjar-tv 
7 :00pm 



31.2 

wgr-tv 
7:00pm 



36.5 

wben-tv 
10:30pm 



18.8 

wjar tv 
7:00pm 



25.8 19.5 

wbrc-tv wben-tv 
10:00pm 7:30pm 



16.8 

wpro-tv 
7:00pm 



35.3 23.5 27.8 19.8 

wbrc-tv wgr-tv wlw-d wjar-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



25.3 28.4 24.8 

wapi-tv wben-tv whio-tv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



16.8 20.5 

wapi-tv wgr-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 



36.3 22.5 23.8 

wbrc-tv wben-tv wlw-d 
8:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



30.8 

wbrc-tv 

10:00pm 



13.3 

wlw-d 
0:00pm 


24.3 

wbrc-tv 

10:00pm 




27.3 

whio-tv 
7:00pm 








29.8 

whio-tv 
10:30pm 


10.5 

wpro-tv 
7 :15pm 




29.3 

whio-tv 
7:00pm 


20.8 

wbrc-tv 
10:30pm 




12.5 

wben-tv 

7:00pm 


19.3 

whio-tv 
7 30pm 





13.2 

wgr-tv 
11:30pm 



17.8 

wbrc-tv 

10:30pm 



'I or was In other than top 10. Classification as to number o( station! In 
• t Is Pulse's own Pulse determines number by measuring which sta- 
1 are actually received by homes in the metropolitan area of a given mar- 
even though slat inn Itself may be outside metropolitan area of the market. 



LATEST ARB 

FOUR WEEK, Oct. 15-Nov.ll SURVEY 

Shows WDEF-TV 

CHATTANOOGA 



fir** 




fit 



total competitive quarter hrs . 

WDEF-TV 226 

Station B 191 

Station C 6 1 
Jk 
'* mSI fa ffprime viewing hrs. 7- 11:15pm 

WDEF-TV 71 

Station B 2 7 

Station C 2 2 

in facilities too! 

telecasting from 



first 



broadcast cent 




The BRANHAM Company 




74th MARKET-CHATTANOOGA 






As format controversy conies to a head, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What constitutes good radio 




Three station men discuss con- 
troversial music-news format and 
describe programing techniques 
they have found to be successful 
in developing audience loyalty. 



Robert W. Frudeger, president, 
WIRL, Peoria, Illinois 

The factors that constitute good 
sound in radio today are as varied as 
the personalities that you meet on the 



Most impor- 
tant single 
element is 
continuity 



street, but there are a few common 
denominators. First take music. This 
is the one radio activity that attracts 
the most listenership. The important 
thing here is to establish a music 
policy which will reflect the sound 
strived for, and then control the pol- 
icy! Call it "formula music" if you 
will, but remember there are thou- 
sands of formulas, all of which can 
be good sound. 

The second denominator is News. 
All of the factors which constitute 
good news reporting must be in evi- 
dence. Past that, good sound is 
achieved with creative thinking in the 
news department. When the news 
people get the idea that something 
besides reporting has to be put into 
newscasts and are sold on the thought, 
the effects are electrifying. Turn them 
loose! Any idea they come up with 
should be mulled over and at least 
tried on tape if not aired. 

Another denominator is commer- 
cials — an area that is in serious need 
of exploitation by the radio indus- 
try. Produced on tape or disc and 
used many times, a commercial adds 



vitality to the sound. It can be hu- 
morous, dramatic, loaded with sound 
effects, two-voiced, or any other com- 
bination of production factors at the 
disposal of the station, but if it is 
worthwhile and well conceived, there 
can be no question that good com- 
mercials add to good sound. 

The fourth denominator is the asso- 
ciated sounds. Just like the facets in 
any individual's personality, these 
will vary according to the preference 
of the station operator. Station identi- 
fication jingles, sounds that constitute 
feature openers — these are the specific 
sounds that contribute to the total 
sound and they should be present to 
the extent of the ingenuity of the pro- 
duction staff and the management. 

Station promotions help constitute 
good sound. They add an exciting 
flavor. Whether the promotion is 
hiding money or recruiting wheel 
chairs for a hospital is of little sig- 
nificance at the moment, but the treat- 
ment of the promotion is of tremen- 
dous consequence. The regularity 
with which promotions appear on the 
station are a part of the total sound 
and should be as controlled as the 
music policy. 

I've reserved the sixth denominator 
till last because it is the human ele- 
ment that cannot be completely con- 
trolled. The announcers — we call 
them "Music Men", at WIRL, are 
personalities within the total person- 
ality of the station. A policy must be 
formulated for music men to operate 
with consistency. Their attitude of 
friendliness, happiness, and their per- 
sonable approach to the listener as if 
she or he were the only listener, make 
for good sound. Music men of 
today have to be flexible. They are 
no longer a "voice personality." They 
must be physically exposed. A fast- 
moving, aggressive music man of the 
current era is always looking for the 
opportunity to preside at a record 
hop, talk before a local group, be the 
first one to give the pint of blood; 
under no circumstances can he afford 
the attitude of being too sophisticated 



for any situation people might fine 
enjoyable, provided it is in good taste 
The most important single elemen 
in good radio sound is continuity 
Radio is fast becoming a functiona 
medium, and with the development o'. 
smaller and smaller receivers has be 
come a very personal medium. As 
such it must react as a person. Tin 
bright, jovial, understanding, warn 
personality of the friend you know 
is always an enjoyable experience 
Listeners tune in because they know 
the sound they can generally exped 
from the station. The day has Ion 
passed when management can blithely 
turn the sound over to a prograir 
director and concern himself with tW 
mighty problems of administration 
Sound is what we sell. Sound i; 
Radio. It is our only link with oui 
listener and our most valuable asset. 



Paul Ruhle, osst. sales manager, WSIX 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Voices and music play an ex^ 
tremely important part in the new 
WSIX sound. Voices that are pleasanl 
and have a personality . . . Voices 
that can "sell" the advertisers' prod-i 
ucts in a convincing manner with ar 
authority that brings listener loyalty 

With the voices goes music that is 
not in an offensive vein. Music and 
its selection in radio today has be 
come an art. Music that is tailor-j 
made for the audience . . . and this 




Good voices 
selective 
music, skillful 
production 



calls for quite a change in selections 
programed during the various hours 
of the day. Basically, the WSIX Top 
Sixty: standards, million sellers and 
newest releases constitute our active 



54 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



o sound? 



i 



in 



hi 



broadcast music library. The Top 
Sixty is not based on retail sales 
alone — although sales do play a part 
in selection of tunes. The WSIX 
Top Sixty includes no raucus tunes 
that would offend our listeners. No 
"sustaining" music — just "commer- 
cial"' music! The music format is 
under tight control through the pro- 
gram director. Music to fit the time 
of day is a secret more broadcasters 
could utilize. 

Even the best of voices and balanced 
music suffer a great deal with poor 
broadcast production. With plenty of 
jingles, lots of good taste gimmick- 
commercials and recorded station 
.1 promos, the announcers (WSIX has 
combo operation) are trained to 
tighten production to such a point as 
to have not one second of dead air. 
A real tight operation adds plenty of 
showmanship to a station. That, in 

nutshell, is what I consider a good 
radio sound: A well-rounded pro- 
gram format produced in a pleasing 
manner and presented with a sound 
that is as near perfection as possible. 

At WSIX, I feel our responsibilities 
to listeners and advertisers are on 
an equal basis. Were setting as our 
goal good results for advertisers, and 
good programs for listeners, all of 
which comes out of the whoofers and 
tweeters as good radio sound. 



i 



i 









JBIiry Sullivan, gen. manager, WSOC, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

First of all, radio is show business 
and there are certain fundamental 



Apply show 
business prin- 
ciples of tim- 
ing, enthusi- 
asm, variety 



irinciples inherent in effective show- 
nanship whether it be old time vaude- 
ville or a modern radio station. These 
(Please turn to page 70) 




tha KOBY record i2 tops inSan Francisco 




In 

Greenville, Miss. 

it's 

WCVM 



You can forget the others— because the hit number in 
San Francisco is 85.4% (Adults in Audience Composition). 
This rating from the June Nielsen shows that KOBY is 
the top seller— that keeps its loyal San Francisco audience 
on its toes-and in a buying frame of mind! No double 
spotting— your message gets maximum impact! 

See your Petry man — and get on the KOBY Hit Parade! 
Add the KOBY record to your collection of sales successes! 



KOBY 10,000 watts 
in San Francisco 



SEE PETRY about W % discount 

when buying both KOBY, San Francisco 

and KOSI, Denver 




MID-AMERICA BROADCASTING COMPANY 



iPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



55 



i 




WHAT A 

RATING 

FROM THIS 

MATING! 




JOAN DAVIS 

I MARRIED JOAN 

co-starring JIM BACKUS 



The ratings are rolling right up to the summit! The 98 segments of 
"I Married Joan", shown daytime or night-time, reach the peak of 
family enjoyment — and they're sky-high in sponsor interest! That's 
why these stations coast-to-coast have just signed up "I Married Joan" : 



WABC-TV New York City 
WNAC-TV Boston, Mass. 
WTEN -TV Albany, N. Y. 
WMAL-TV Washington, D. C. 
WIIC-TV Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WNBF-TV Binghamton, N. Y 
WXEX-TV Petersburg, Va. 
WBTV Charlotte, N. C. 



KABC-TV Los Angeles, Calif. 
WWJ-TV Detroit, Michigan 
KFJ2-TV Ft. Worth, Texas 
WRGP-TV Chattanooga, Tenn. 
KPHO-TV Phoenix, Ariz. 
WKJG-TV Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
KGMB-TV Honolulu, T. H. 
KTNT Seattle, Washington 



Join them and inject some solid fun into your programming ! 



Call your Interstate Television representative now! 



NEW YORK, N. Y., 445 Park Avenue, MUrray Hill 8-2545 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 260 Kearny Street 

CHICAGO, ILL., Allied Artists Pictures Inc., 1250 S. Wabash Avenue 

DALLAS, TEXAS, 2204-06 Commerce St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C, 3207 Friendly Road 

TORONTO, CANADA, Sterling Films Ltd., King Edward Hotel 




television 



CORPORATION 



56 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 




Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



10 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Looming large on the 1959 horizon for syndication and the tv film industry 
are developments that signalize new opportunities, fresh breakthroughs and ma- 
jor upheavals. 

Here's what keen observers in the trade say might be expected in 1959: 

GROSS BUSINESS: 1959 as syndication's first $100 million year. 

TAPE: There'll be a year of widespread tests and experiments with tape with (1) film 
program producers going into tape to get their feet wet rather than seriously trying to sell 
it; (2) lots of swapping of taped series by stations with even Ampex acting as a clearing 
house of exchange. 

PROGRAMING: There'll be major diversification along these lines: (1) drama will 
make a major comeback with likely better scripts and stars than syndication has had before; 
(2) a favorable reception will be ready for comedies, detective-mysteries, science fiction and 
other types lately in relative eclipse; (3) the climate will be ripe for programing and produc- 
tion by new tv film companies, especially the smaller and independent ones. 

AD BUDGETS & SPENDING will follow the national business profits picture, not 
gross volume, with these new possibilities for syndication money: (1) more advertisers will 
switch from network to syndication and national spot programs, following the example of 
Kellogg and Amoco; (2) new industries will come through with syndication spending, such 
as homebuilding and maintenance, airlines and personal services involving medical care, edu- 
cation and recreation; (3) there'll be new buying patterns afoot such as a return to full- 
week sponsorships, buying of two programs instead of one by regional advertisers, 
and more bolstering of trouble markets by national buyers. 

FOREIGN PRODUCTION AND SALES: Production overseas will increase for the 
simple reason that it's a way of by-passing import quotas on U. S. tv film, and the foreign 
market will go up to around 15% of all 1959 tv film business, especially with the added im- 
petus of sales in Australia and Japan. 

MOTION PICTURE INTERESTS: These will be out again to try and capture their 
share of tv production: Already rolling are UA and J. Arthur Rank. 

THE FCC: While speculation goes on wildly in film circles on the possible rulings af- 
fecting option time, must-buy lists and even a divorce of the networks from their syndication 
arms, it's clear that any new ruling that might come out of Washington in 1959 can 
only be an advantage to the syndication industry as a whole. 



Another measure of the strides taken by the syndication field as an integral 
part of the television industry: 

TvB's admission of film syndicators as associate members. 



Colonial Stores is switching its syndication money from a first-run show to an off-network 
re-run. 

Its 16-market southeastern region will use ITC's Sergeant Preston; the retailer's con- 
tracts for Grey Ghost ran out at the end of 1958. 

Also signing for Sergeant Preston is Heide candies (Kelly, Nason, Inc.) for major mar- 
kets of New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston. 



PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



57 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The latest sales-programing strategy to come out of Ziv is the idea of cashing 
in on newspaper headlines. 

Going into production is Moon Probe, a space exploration series starring William 
Holden. 

And capitalizing on interest in Alaska is purchase of tv rights to Klondike Fever, a 
recent book club selection. 

Screen Gems has come up with a new source of film programs from now 
through 1962. 

The Hollywood team of Clarence Greene and Russel Rouse signed to produce, direct and 
write a total of six film programs over a three-year period. 

First of the series is Underworld, a mystery adventure now starting production. 

ITC is continuing to mushroom its executive forces. 

In the production area, the new director appointed is Edward A. (Ted) Rogers, to col- 
laborate with programing director Al Ward, while in the field of international sales Abe 
Mandell is the new manager, covering the western hemisphere plus parts of the Far East. 

Latest Telepulse ratings (see page 52) show it's the adventure series — not the 
Western — that's the top-rated type in syndication. 

Among the top ten, five film shows are adventures, two are mysteries and three are 
Westerns. 

National Telepulse averages for the five highest-scoring adventures series are Highway 
Patrol 21.5; Sea Hunt 19.1; Silent Service 16.7; Whirlybirds 16.5 and State Trooper 15.8. 



COMMERCIALS: Any crystalballing of 1959 prospects for commercials must 
put the focus on this query: What will happen with tape? 

A quick look-forward with regard to tape poses these possibilities: 

1) As the No. 1 center of commercial production New York will see the greatest con- 
centration of tape uses. 

2) The transition from film to tape will gain in momentum as the technique of taping 
improves. 

3) Because of the $250,000 investment required for ample tape installation, the smaller 
commercial producers will find themselves hard put to offer a taping service. 

4) Tape's two big advantages — it's fast and economical — will spur research to overcome 
some of the existing technical difficulties. 

5) Commercial producers who have adopted a wait-and-see attitude toward tape may 
find themselves a year behind the parade, if the new method becomes an unreserved click. 

Among the side-effects that might be expected from the strides taken by tape: 

• Added impetus to finding new film techniques as the answer to tape. 

• If the total film business takes an appreciable drop, there'll be a trend toward consolida 
tion of the industry into the hands of the larger producers. 

Technically, it should be a big year of advance, with such techniques to watch as the 
infra-red process, aerial image animation, slide motion and a revival of fantasy in live action 
and location shooting. 

A cautionary note: The union situation may become so complex and costly that 
film people will be discouraged from taking up with tape altogether. 

58 SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



10 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



As the Congressional session got under way this week coming events cast these 
shadows : 

1) The FCC will be conducting deliberations with many faces peering over its shoulders 
and many outside hands will be poking through more or less old embers. 

2) Already disturbed by the Department of Justice's insistence that network option time 
is per se a violation of the anti-trust laws, the FCC will not lack for Congressional advice 
about what to do. 

3) Though the State of the Union message provides an opportunity to say what the White 
House would like done about reforming the regulatory agencies, the best word is that the ad- 
ministration will steer clear of this issue. 

4) In the budget message, with much to-do about how the FCC can do its many jobs 
better and the FCC can track down more fraudulent advertisers, no additional funds 
are expected to be asked for either agency. 

5) The broadcasting industry may well be facing harsh music during the session, 
with second-guessing coming at every turn as the FCC struggles with such matters as uhf and 
the general tv allocations picture, pay tv, the many Barrows Report recommendations and a 
host of other problems. 



Featuring the early flood of measures introduced in the infant 86th were those 
which would make pay-tv illegal. 

This could be one of the most interesting legislative battles concerning broadcasting, 
largely because nobody can predict what will happen. 

That Rep. Oren Harris, chairman of the House Commerce Committee and arch oppo- 
nent of the pay system, will call hearings early in the session is not doubted. 

That Harris will have an anti-pay-tv bill reported from his committee is almost certain. 
Questions begin to rise as to whether Harris will actually push for passage of his bill 
on the floor of the House. 

The question marks multiply over in the Senate. Sen. Warren Magnuson, chairman of 
the Senate Commerce Committee and arch-foe of those who would forbid the FCC to act on 
pay-tv, has also promised hearings. 

Magnuson was outvoted by a single vote last year on the Thurmond resolution express- 
ing the sense of the Senate that the FCC should not permit the system. But the bill was 
never officially reported, and Thurmond and Magnuson passed the buck between them. 

Whether the changes in committee members this year will tip the scales in favor of pay-tv 
remains to be seen. 

The Harris House Commerce Legislative Oversight subcommittee did not givo 
FCC investigators free access to its files on the Boston channel 5 case. This fire- 
cracker Avas exploded by FCC associate general counsel Edgar Holtz at the opening of the Coin- 
mission's review of the award of the channel to the Boston Herald -Traveler. 

Holtz said that what examination he was permitted didn't reveal a single item of any great 
importance. 

Why the bang-bang crusading Harris subcommittee, with its loud demands for malefac- 
tors to be brought to justice, should turn coy about anything in its files was not explained. 



PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



59 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



10 JANUARY 1959 In the course of the holiday confusion you may have missed noting that the agency 

copyright 1959 field has broken the four-name barrier. 

sponsor The new endurance champ: Kastor, Hilton, Chesley, Clifford & At her ton. 



PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Don't be surprised to hear within the next few months that a key figure in one of the 
top-ranking agencies is scouting around for a deal on his $5-6-million account. 

Recent executive reshuffles and other maneuvers indicate the handwriting is on the wall. 



Some of the agency mergers currently taking place have this angle: They permit 
the older men in the lesser agency with stock holdings to gain a better position of 

security. 

A merger is the only way they can (1) get cash on their stock, or (2) put a solid value 
under their holdings. 



A. C. Nielsen, Jr., who recently appeared on a Chicago interview show, escaped getting 
rated. 

None of the polltakers had a count going in Chicago that week. 

Laughed one of Nielsen's competitors : "If it had been a rating week for us, we'd 
have chalked up the program as minus zero." 



One of the biggest billers in the agency field last week installed an austerity 
program which bars generous expense accounts for client entertainment. 

The economy directive also urged fuller utilization of employee time and urged that 
free research for clients be cut to a minimum. 

Reason: The margin of profit in 1958 was too thin for comfort. 



Norge's practice of buying time on its own time at local rates could, according to 
Michigan Avenue reports, wind up in a serious dilemma for the recent Keyes, Madden & 
Jones-Donahue & Coe link. 

What the agency faces is this: 

Should it give the account the alternative of buying through channels — or else? 

For the record: Put down McCann-Erickson as the first of the major agencies theo- 
retically owned by the employees. 

The transition came about when H. K. McCann sold his preferred stock — the exclu- 
sive voting stock — to the agency's two big employee funds: (1) the pension and retirement 
fund and (2) the profit-sharing trust. 

Both funds have their voting power in the hands of a trusteeship composed of 
Marion Harper, Jr., Robert E. Healy, and Wilbert G. S tils on. 

Meanwhile the agency's B (non-voting) stock is held by 140-150 employees. 

60 SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 







The session ended with a 52-week renewal of International 
Harvester's Better Farming feature on WSM, proof of Agency and 
Advertiser's confidence in the selling power of the Central South's 
number one sales Medium. 

If you have something to sell an area which has a Farm income of 
almost $1 Billion, a total income of $2% Billion, which owns 145,749 
tractors and trucks and 202,464 farms . . . better get in touch with 
Bob Cooper or your nearest Blair man. The facts on the WSMpire 
are fabulous, the sales potential more fabulous and WSM's selling 
power even more so. 

WSM Radio 

Key to one of America's Major Markets 

50,000 Watts 'Clear Channel • Blair Represented • Bob Cooper, Gen. Mgr. 






OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
IPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 61 



RADIO RESULTS 



Capsule case histories of successfu 
local and regional radio campaign. 



DAIRY 

SPONSOR: Foremost Dairies, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: For many years, the Woodlawn 
Dairy Products Div. of Foremost Dairies. Scranton, Pa. has 
used local radio as an important component of its advertis- 
ing effort. In fact, Woodlawn is now in its 24th consecutive 
\ car as an advertiser on WGBI, Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, 
where it runs a large schedule of spot announcements and 
program sponsorships — a schedule that has regularly in- 
creased through the years. That radio advertising has been 
highl) successful for Woodlawn is demonstrated by the fact 
that the dairy has invested more and more money with 
WGBI each year and by the steady growth of the dairy 
products company. Known for years as the Woodlawn Farm 
Dairy Co., it recently merged with another company to 
become Foremost Dairies, Inc., and enlarged its product 
line. In addition to milk and cheese products, the dairy pro- 
duces Dolly Madison and Foremost Ice Cream, top sellers 
through WGBI's coverage area of northeastern Pennsylvania. 

WGBI, Scranton-Wilkes-Barre PURCHASE: Announcements 



UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

SPONSOR: Yale University Bookstore AGENCY: Direc 

Capsule case history: The Yale University Bookstore hat 
for years used "conventional" advertising methods to pro 
mote the sale of its books and stationery items, mostly prini 
ads of various types. The store had never used radio. Earh 
in December, the bookstore was induced to try a test sched- 
ule on WELI, New Haven, in order to gain maximum bene 
fit of the Christmas buying season. The results provec 
astounding to C. L. Willoughby, general manager of tht 
operation. "At the end of the first month of our noblt 
experiment in promoting books on WELI the results becamt 
sharply apparent. We have definitely noticed a changing 
traffic pattern," he stated. "There has been an increase o 
as much as 46% in the number of transactions, and I wouli 
say that radio advertising has been the primary reason. I 
personally, have received a number of favorable comment 
from customers and am convinced that radio produces i 
loyal and attentive listening audience," says Willoughln 

WELI, New Haven PURCHASE: Announcement 



SUPERMARKET CHAIN 

SPONSOR: Seven-Eleven Food Stores AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Seven-Eleven Food Stores, a 
supermarket chain operating in Monroe and West Monroe, 
La., periodically runs special children's shows, in which 
movies are shown and various advertising and promotional 
matter of the stores are exhibited. In the experience of 
Seven-Eleven, the success of these promotions can be directly 
correlated to the sales results of various items, not to 
mention good will and the building of future loyal customers. 
On 25 November, the chain presented its "Seven-Eleven's 
Kiddv Show" at a local theater. The food stores purchased 
a schedule on KNOE, Monroe to announce and draw audi- 
ence to the event — no other form of advertising and no 
other station was used. On the morning of the show, a 
record 1,000 youngsters stormed the theater to see the 
movies. "I have known for years that our radio advertising 
was effective, but I've never had it brought home so clearly," 
commented H. R. Brausuell, ad manager of the food chain. 
KNOE, Monroe, La. PURCHASE: Announcements 

62 



CORSET STYLIST 

SPONSOR: Ethel George AGENCY: Direc 

Capsule case history: Ethel George, a San Francisco corse 
stylist, turned to radio after many years of newspape 
advertising. The owner and operator of a medium-sizei 
corset specialty shop, with a modest budget, Mrs. Georg 
must do her media buying with a high degree of prudence 
and make every advertising dollar count. Recently, Mrs 
George purchased several participations in Emily Barton an> 
Floyd Buick on KFRC — a program that has a large follow 
ing among women in the San Francisco Bay Area. The she 
is programed across the board from 11 to 11:30 a.m. In 
letter to Emily Barton, Mrs. George stated: "No advertisin 
in the San Francisco papers can compare with what you 
commercials have done for me. KFRC has brought me man 
new customers who, in turn, tell their friends what they hea 
on your program. A few participations at only $40 eac 
outpulled the San Francisco newspaper advertisement 
costing from three to six times as much. "Radio's sold me. 



KFRC, San Francisco 



SPONSOR 



PURCHASE: Participation 



10 JANUARY 1959 



* 







Q 



§ 
H 



In an emergency, what radio station 
do you listen to for school closings, 
meeting postponements, storm news, etc.? 

When polled by PULSE on this significant service score, 
Washington, D. C, area residents voted WWDC first— 
gave us more mentions than any other radio station. 



This vote of confidence and popularity is yours, as a WWDC adver- 
tiser. It is only one of the many measurements of our ever-growing 
leadership in the Washington, D. C, Metropolitan Area. For full 
details, write for "Personality Profile of a Radio Station." Or ask 
your Blair man for a copy. It makes mighty interesting reading. 




•o Washington 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 

Things continue to move fast in Jacksonville, Fla.— where WWDC-owned Radio 
WMBR is now first in the morning and second in the afternoon (Oct.-Nov. Hooper). 
New national rep. John Blair will happily supply the solid facts and figures. 



)NSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



63 



ADVERTISERS 



After a two year spot tv test cam- 
paign, Hollywood Candy has de- 
cided to go network. 

The move: a 52-week buy into 
Dick Clark's American Bandstand 
(ABC TV). 

The reason: Hollywood is con- 
vinced that teen agers make up the 
biggest and best candy bar market. 
In addition to the Bandstand, the 
candy firm will continue to use spots 
in key markets. 

Agency: Grubb & Petersen, Cham- 
paign, 111. 

Ideas at work: 

• Contest: On KULA, Honolulu, 
sponsored by Carnation Milk Co. 

The main gist was a 'second honey- 
moon' idea, with listeners writing in 
why they deserve one, and as a tie-in, 



a duplicate prize went to the manager 
of the market putting up the best Car- 
nation display in connection with the 
contest. 

• Libby, McNeill & Libby is in 
the midst of its midwinter "Best Buy 
Days," a store promotion event. To 
kick off the campaign, Libby's little 
"beanie boy" — star of the food com- 
pany's animated film commercials — 
will appear on the Jimmy Dean show 
27 January, featuring Libby's entire 
line of canned foods. 

Merger: Vita Food Products of 
New York and Mothers Food Prod- 
ucts of Newark, bringing the com- 
bined gross sales for the new com- 
pany to an estimated $20 million. 

Strictly personnel: Seymour Kel- 
ler has been appointed to the newly 
created post of merchandising man- 
ager for Lestoil. Inc. . . . Don Ram- 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



Have a ball: This was the main idea of 
the holiday promotion staged by Ball Asso- 
ciates, Philadelphia agency. Here model 
Evelyn Schufrieder presents a rubber ball 
to Jim Farrell, of WRCV-TV, Philadelphia 



The winner! NBC TV affiliate KOA-TV, 
Denver won the $5,000 first prize for basic 
station, for best promotion campaign in 
support of NBC TV's daytime program 
line-up. The presentation is shown below 





say has been named sales promotion 
manager of the Pittsburgh Brewing 
Co. . . . Mort Yanow has been ap- 
pointed director of radio and tv for 
Bayuk Cigars, Inc. . . . Arthur Inn- 
dell, promoted to v. p. in charge of 
advertising and marketing for the 
ReaLemon-Puritan Co. . . . Thomas 
Preston, to sales training manager 
and John Fortino and Stanley 
Bartleman to field sales training 
managers of Zenith Radio Corp. 



AGENCIES 



Newman McEvoy, v. p. and direc- 
tor of media at Cunningham & 
Walsh, emphasized the impor- 
tance of the changing market at 
the RTES Seminar luncheon in 
New York last week. 

His topic: the media-marketing 
team — a most "happy marriage of 
completely compatible interest" that, 
makes for efficient advertising and 
selling. 

Using an organization chart for 
elaboration, McEvoy noted a rela-; 
tionship of the team in the form oi 




He just won't fit: Bob Dale, KFMB-TY 
San Diego personality, experiences somd 
difficulty getting animal through statior 
studios for telecast of circus on Early Shou 



Wp*E 





^ _jj "™»L 


CHAfMEl^^K 




^PP^S 




mf%i% ** 


I \ PITTSBURGH 




Jtri*, 






W.*m2rYsm 


K^yWtf 1 ' 'I 


Big 


tv in Pittsburgh: This is the them^ 


used 


by WTAE to 


promote itself on-theB 


air. 


Method: Photo 


I.D. slides like thil 


one, 


depicting happy and excited peoplB 




SPONSOR • 


10 JANUARY 195<1 



a lateral communication, under the 
direction of the account supervisor. 
An important function of this team, 
according to McEvoy, is to analyze a 
market with an awareness of its "dy- 
namic geography" — that with indus- 
try changing it, and tv coverage unit- 
ing several of them, many areas be- 
come "strange bedfellows" and can 
be sold and planned as such. 



Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample started 
off this year with a realignment 
bf top echelon titles, and a broad- 
ening of the executive responsi- 
bilities. 
The set-up: 

The executive committee, in opera- 
ion for two years, will head all 
jhases of the agency's operations, in- 
cluding marketing and servicing. 

The assignments: F. Sewall Gard- 
ner, senior v.p. in charge of the Chi- 
ago office; Chester Birch, to ex- 
cut ive v.p.; Lyndon Brown, Sid- 
ley Hamilton, Gordon Johnson 
ind George Tormey, senior v.p.'s. 
Fred Leighty, to administrative v. 
»., and continues as secretary; Wil- 
iam Maughan, to v.p. and business 



manager, as well as treasurer; Harold 
McCormick and Chester Stover, 
named v.p.'s in the New York office, 
while Clyde Rapp was named v.p. in 
charge of the Dayton office. 

On the closed-circuit front: Ful- 
ler & Smith & Ross scored as the 
first agency to enter into the closed- 
circuit radio field via a "State of the 
Agency" address by president Rob- 
ert E. Allen in New' York to FSR of- 
fices in San Francisco, Chicago, 
Cleveland and Pittsburgh. 

Agencies on the move: N. W. 

Ayer is moving to the Time & Life 
Building in Radio City in the Fall, 
consolidating its Manhattan staff in 
one building . . . F&S&R will shift 
its corporate headquarters and New 
York office to the Tishman Building, 
666 Fifth Avenue, around 1 May. 

Name change: Schwab and Beatty, 
Inc., New York, became Schwab, 
Beatty & Porter last week. Richard 
Porter, with the agency for 28 years, 
was elected a director and executive 
v.p. last April. 



Agency appointments: Paxton \ 

Gallagher Co.. makers of Hutter-Nut 
Coffee, from Buchanan-Thomas, to 
Tatham-Laird, Chicago, for all ad 
vertising except on the West Coast 
This area will be handled by D'Arcy 
P&G's selection was based on boll 
agencies research and marketing fa 
cilitics . . . Charmin Paper Products 
a subsidiary of Procter & Gamble, for 
its new bathroom tissue, White Cloud 
to D-F-S . . . Crowley's Milk Co. 
Binghamton, N. Y., with plans for 
spending $164,000 in radio, t\ and 
point-of-purchase materials, to the 
Rumrill Co., Rochester. 

More on appointments: Revlon, 
for its weight reducer Thin-Down, to 
Heineman, Kleinfeld, Shaw & 
Joseph, joining two other Revlon 
products — Home Beautiful Room Mist 
and That Man Cologne for Men . . . 
The Magnetic Products division of 
Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing 
Co., to MacManus, John & Adams 
. . . The Standard Camera Corp.. to 
Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline, 
Inc. . . . The Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Co., to Tucker Wayne & Co., 




.•'tiers, he gets letters: Art Brown, morning personality on 
^ \\ DC, Washington, D. C. is weighed down by some 2,000 birthday 
jards and anniversary wishes (his 23rd radio year) from fans 



j.ive a toy, get a doughnut! WHK, Cleveland for its "Toys For 
ots" drive, gave coffee and cake to donors. Shown here (1 to r) 
re Eva McElroy, d.j. Jack Denton and Sharris Milner, of WHK 





Miss Paramount Week, actress Sand] Warner poses on tin- films 
to be run on KNXT, Los Angeles this ur<-k. Station selected starlet 
to promote iis kick-off week of Paramount movies on-the-air 



65 



• * • 

KGON 

Serves Fast 

Growing 

PORTLAND, OREGON 

and 

The Great Northwest 

with top 

NBC 

programs 

— and — 

Local Album Music 

News . . . Weather 

Sports 

• • • 

KGON 

1520 K.C. 

• • • 
Weed Radio Corp. 

Nat'l Rep. 

• • • 

Telephone OLive 6-1441 



The station for whirl-wind sales 

action! 

WWRL 

beamed to sell New York's 

2,455,000 

NEGRO & PUERTO RICAN MARKET 




Atlanta . . . Norwich Pharmacal Co., 
for international advertising of Pep- 
to-Bismol. Norforms Ungentine and 
NP-27, from McCann-Erickson to 
Gotham-Vladimir. 



Thisa 'n' data: Dick Stites, ac- 
count executive at McCormick-Arm- 
strong agency in Wichita, is the win- 
ner of the KTVH, Wichita sponsored 
"Space Age Advertising Award" . . . 
Meeting note: The National Adver- 
tising Agency Network will hold 
its national meeting 28 June-4 July at 
Del Monte Lodge, Pebble Beach, Cal. 
Its Eastern region will meet 23-25 
January at the Hotel Statler in Wash- 
ington and for the Midwest, at the 
Hotel Cleveland, in Cleveland, 30-31 
January. 

They were named v.p.'s: Joe 
Hughes, v.p. in charge of the Dallas 
office of Grant Advertising . . . Mrs. 
Frances Corey, to v.p. in charge of 
the West Coast operations of Grey 
Advertising . . . John Peace, to first 
vice presidency of William Esty . . . 
Edward Gumpert, to v.p. and 
chairman of the marketing plans com- 
mittee at Geyer, Morey, Madden & 
Ballard . . . John Doherty, Stewart 
Brown and Jules Dickely, named 
v.p.'s of Ted Bates & Co. . . . Thomas 
Dillon, elected treasurer and mem- 
ber of the executive committee and 
Clayton Huff, elected a v.p. of 
BBDO . . . James Cox, to v.p. of 
Glasser-Gailey, Inc., Los Angeles. 

Other personnel moves: Edmund 
Johnstone, elected a director and 
vice-chairman of the board at Calkins 
& Holden . . . William Phillips, to 
director of the media department at 
Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove . . . Ar- 
thur Terry, to director of the media 
department in the Detroit office of 
Geyer, Morey, Madden & Ballard . . . 
Paul Bradley, to the merchandising 
department and Lawrence Puchta, 
appointed senior account executive at 
K&E ... In Chicago: James Teck- 
enbrock, account executive at BBDO 
. . . David Silverman, to produc- 
tion manager of Kuttner & Kuttner 
. . . Wilbur Davidson, to v.p. at 
Gordon & Hempstead . . . Robert 
Demme, manager of the Miami office 
of Communications Counselors . . . 
William Haworth, to account super- 
visor at Creative PR, Inc., the firm 



recently organized by Anderson & 
Cairns. 



FILM 



Ziv president John L. Sinn in a 
year-end statement foresaw a 
couple of explicit changes in the 
status of tv film. 

They were: 

1959 will be the first year in which 
telefilm won't be able to count 
on the rapid growth of tv. 

• There's a coming battle over 
programing and Ziv now has 30 
programs under consideration and/or 
development. 

AFTRA-SAG tape issue : Last week 
the NAB asked the National Labor 
Relations Board for permission to 
present its views in the pending case 
involving videotape commercials tal- 
ent, stating that stations which would 
be affected have not had a chance to 
be heard. 



Imperial fan: Flamingo reports that 
its foreign sales have produced this 
unusual result: the Emperor of Japan 
declared Superman to be his favorite 
tv show. 

Sales: ITC reports two regional sales 1 
plus other pacts for Sergeant Preston I 
amounting to 95 markets: Colonial 
Stores in Atlanta: Albany, Ga.; Au-'l 
gusta, Ga.; Columbus, Ga.; Char- | 
lotte; Cincinnati; Columbus, 0.; Co- 
lumbia, S. C; Dayton; Durham- | 
Raleigh; Indianapolis; Jacksonville: ) 
Macon; Richmond; Wilmington and 
Winston-Salem . . . Henry Heide also 
signed for the series in New "York 
Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit and 
Boston; other sponsors include Fargr 
Packing, Boston; Arnold Bakeries 
Washington; Pepsi-Cola and Bisor 
Cheese, Buffalo; Klein Peter Dairy 
Baton Rouge; Yakima Dairymen'? 
Assn., Yakima; and Dick Brother- 
bakery, Green Bay; . . . station sale; 
include WGN-TV, Chicago, WITI 
Milwaukee; WLAC-TV, Nashville 
WTVN, Columbus, 0.; KTNT-TV! 
Seattle and KPTV, Portland. 



Promotion: John Bromfield was ii 
New York City to, promote his V. S 
Marshall series on behalf of NTA 
WRCA-TV and Budweiser Beer. 



60 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 ( - 



Sports: Fred Frink, head of the De- 
troit office of Van Praag Produc- 
tions, produced a half hour color pro- 
gram on the Orange Bowl game. 



NETWORKS 



The heads of ABC Radio and 
ABC TV this week issued state- 
ments declaring they were look- 
ing ahead to a strong 1959, busi- 
ness and otherwise. 

Among the highlights of the ABC 
Radio statement, quoting v.p.-in- 
charge Edward DeGray: 

• ABC Radio closed the year with 
La 23% gain in sponsored time over 

©57. 

• Among the important advertis- 
ers signed for 1959 are A. E. Staler 
i,Mfg. Co., for the Peter Lind Hays- 
LV/ary Healy show; American Home 

Foods for Breakfast Club and week- 
end news; and Colgate, for News 
Around the World. 

• The radio network increased its 
I home commercial listening hours per 

average week from 5.8 million in 
|l957 to 7.2 million in 1958. 

ABC TV affirmed it was in its 
most solid position in the net- 
work's history. 

Some of the reasons it gave: 
I • Programing: the addition of 
i jome 70 new quarter-hours of day- 
Kime shows per week, with 95% of it 
•old out to 18 advertisers, 
i • The network now has 63 differ- 
■nt sponsors, compared with 50 in 
957. Also, the number of commer- 
ial hours sold has nearly doubled — 
rom 27 in 1957, to 48 in 1958. 

• Primary affiliates increased from 
'9 to 88; live shows from 82.7' , to 

j l !6.5%. ABC TV anticipates this live 
overage passing the 90% mark this 
'ear. 

fere's TvB's estimated expendi- 
ures for the top 15 network 
ompany advertisers, followed by 
he top network brand adver- 
sers, for October 1958, com- 
iled by LNA-BAR : 



OMPANY 


GROSS TIME COSTS 


1. 


P&G 




$4,336,333 


2. 


Gillette Co. 




2,580,645 


1 


American Home 


2,285,194 


k 


Lever 




2,191,293 


i. 


Colgate 




2,074,237 



6. 


General Motors 


2,073,132 


7. 


General Foods 


1,694,651 


8. 


R. J. Reynolds 


1,293,957 


9. 


P. Lorillard 


1.249,679 


10. 


Ford Motor 


1,227,480 


11. 


Bristol-Myers 


1,179,313 


12. 


General Mills 


1,116,824 


13. 


Chrysler 


917,660 


14. 


Liggett & Myers 


944.371 


15. 


Sterling Druji 


908,584 


BRAND GROSS TIME COSTS 


1. 


Gillette Razors 


$1,226,797 


2. 


Anacin Tablets 


1.015,820 


3. 


Viceroy 


665.929 


4. 


Chevrolet 


633,585 


5. 


Prestone Anti-Freeze 


629,361 


6. 


Kent 


621,788 


7. 


Tide 


545,797 


8. 


Bufferin 


544,849 


9. 


Dristan 


531,984 


10. 


Camel 


512,721 


11. 


Colgate Dental Cream 503,329 


12. 


L k M Filter 


434,554 


13. 


Bulova 


429,447 


14. 


Paper Mate 


428,165 


15. 


Winston 


427,805 




Network renewals and new busi- 
ness: The Campbell Soup Co. has 
picked up its option for another 26 
weeks of the Donna Reed Show 
(ABC TV) . . . Eleven advertisers 
have placed more than $1.5 million 
with NBC TV for its Today and 
Jack Paar shows. Some of the cli- 
ents: Stern's Nurseries, Sandura Co. 
and Hagan Chemicals and Controls. 

CBS Radio began its Program 
Consolidation Plan last week (5), 
with stations representing over 85% 
of the network rate card accepting 
the new line-up. 

Those stations not subscribing to 
the plan, reports president Arthur 
Hull Hayes, will "continue to carry 
our programs under the terms of 
their existing affiliation agreements 
for six months. During this period 
we will make affiliation agreements 
with other stations in these markets 
as replacements." 

CBS reports more than $4 mil- 
lion in net billings have been 
placed by advertisers since the an- 
nouncement of the new plan 30 days 
ago. 

Network note: NBC TV plans to 
have seven Nobel Prize winners in- 
struct on its early a.m. Continental 
Classroom. 



Hundreds of extra eyes to be 
exact — the most restless 
retinue of retinas — work for 
you at SPONSOR to help keep 
you the best informed executive 
on broadcasting that you can 
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Experienced eyes that see 
beneath the surface and beyond 
the fact. Eyes that bring you 
not alone news but the most 
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news in the entire publication 
field. 

That's why you should read 
SPONSOR — at home . . . 
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SPONSOR 

40 East 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

I'll take a year's subscription of SPONSOR. 
You guarantee full refund any time I'm 
not satisfied. 

NAME 

FIRM 



ADDRESS. 



D Bill me 



D Bill firm 



PONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



67 



Personnel news: Austin Peter- 
son, named program consultant for 
ABC TV's Western division . . . 
Court McLeod, to administrative 
manager, in the program department 
of ABC TV's Western division. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Jules Dundes, v.p. in eharge of 
station administration for CBS 
Radio, spoke about radio's natu- 
ral, built-in advantages before a 
meeting of the St. Louis Adver- 
tising Club last week. 

These advantages: its intimacy, its 
universality and its immediacy. 

"Radio — above all other media — 
is a creative advertising man's me- 
dium," noted Dundes. "It charges a 
man with the full measure of his skill 
and knowledge — but then gives full 
value in return for a full payment." 



Ideas at work: 

• A new twist to the new baby in 
the new year idea: Instead of spon- 
soring a contest for the first baby of 
1959, WCGC, Belmont, N. C, held 
a contest for the last baby of 1958, 
with seven stores in the area donat- 
ing prizes for the newborn. 

• Another baby bit : KYW, Cleve- 
land, is circulating a new service — a 
baby sitter's guide. It's a small card 
with room for important phone num- 
bers and special instructions. 

• Something to scream about: The 
Tarlow Stations (WHYE, Roanoke; 
WWOK, Charlotte; WJBW, New Or- 
leans; WHIL, Boston and WARE, 
Ware, Mass.) are capitalizing on the 
horror and science fiction craze by 
inviting listeners to call the station 
and scream. A daily winner and 
then a weekly winner will be chosen. 
They will compete for a trip to 
Miami. 

• Here's how radio helped expect- 
ant mothers who craved watermelons 
in the winter: WTC1N, Minneapolis- 
St. Paul dug up six of them in one 
day by appeals over the air. 

• Oh to be tall! WAKE, Atlanta, 
recently awarded Mrs. F. Lance her 
"height in silver dollars." It was 
part of the station's Hit Parade Club 
promotion, where her number was 
read on the air, and her prize totaled 
$580.50. 



68 



• Another winner: James May, 
for the "Beat Wattrick" football con- 
test via WXYZ, Detroit. The con- 
test: Guess the winners of the games 
and the yardage of a team, and beat 
or tie sportscaster Don Wattrick's 
predictions. 

• She'll meet Perry Como: Mrs. 
Harry Noden correctly named the 
three Como songs and the number of 
times they were played on WCAE, 
Pittsburgh as part of the station's 
"Meet Perry Como" contest. As a 
prize, she and her husband will fly 
to New York and meet the crooner. 
• The Balaban stations held an 
incentive contest for its salesmen. The 
incentive: Top salesman gets a Cadil- 
lac. Winner: Don Hereford, of WIL, 
St. Louis. 

Thisa'n' data: WABC, New York, 
is getting its tower painted! The 
paint — Day-Glo Orange — is noted 
for its high visibility, and even glows 
on cloudy days . . . Budweiser Beer 
(D'Arcy) has bought two hours a 
night, seven nights a week for a Best 
Sellers program via KLAC, Los An- 
geles. Total contract amounts to 
$75,000 annually . . . Another busi- 
ness note: WDAF, Kansas City, will 
air all Athletics baseball games this 
year for Schlitz Brewing Co. 

Station purchase: KABR, Aber- 
deen, S. D., to Frank Fitzsimonds for 
$80,000; brokered by Hamilton, Stub- 
blefield, Twining & Associates, Inc. 

Anniversary note: WAVE, Louis- 
ville, rang out the old year with a 
celebration observing the station's 
25th year. 

Station staffers: Richard Evans,. 

named station manager for KCMO, 
Kansas City . . . William McClena- 
han, appointed executive v.p. and 
general manager of WQUB, Gales- 
burg, 111. . . . Jim Hamby, to sales 
manager of KTSA, San Antonio . . . 
Norman Stewart, to national sales 
manager of WFAA, Dallas . . . James 
Whatley, to national sales manager 
of WETU, Montgomery-Wetumpka, 
Ala. . . . Dean McClain, to com- 
mercial manager, KNON, Dallas-Ft. 
Worth . . . William Abeyounis, be- 
comes account executive at WRRF, 
Washington, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



The Katz Agency has supplied 
agencies with a comparison of 
national spot radio costs for 
1958 over 1957. 

The report: 1958 costs for the top 
150 markets were up ty2% for early 
morning and late afternoon; down 
6.4% for nighttime and remained 
about the same as 1957 for the re- 
maining daytime hours. 

Basis of the report: costs of 12 
one-minute announcements per week 
for 13 weeks in 150 markets. 

Katz is circulating details of this 
summary in a brochure dubbed "Spot 
Radio Budget Estimator" among 
agencies and advertisers. 



The Blair Companies have re- 
leased the first in a series of research 
projects conducted by Trendex, on 
the role of newspapers in com- 
munications. 



The survey coincided with the , 
Newspaper Deliverers' strike in New 1 
York and found: 

1) More than 35% of those inter- 
viewed had not been inconven- 
ienced by the strike. 

2) Among those inconvenienced, less 
than 20% missed the advertise- 
ments and sales. 

3) In spite of radio and tv's exten- 
sive coverage of the news during 
the strike, there were still people 
unaware of the top developments. 

4) Of those aware of the news de- 
velopments, 53.8% heard them on 
tv while 52.4% heard the stories 
on radio. 

Rep appointments: KBON, Oma- 
ha, to McGavren-Quinn . . 

WDEW, Springfield and WBZY, Tor 
rington, Conn., to Breen & Ward. 
New York . . . KREM, Spokane, tc 
Edward Petry & Co. . . . WORC 
Worcester, Mass., to Avery-Knode 
. . . KQDE, Seattle, to Forjoe Co. 



TV STATIONS 



Reviewing the year promotion 
wise, WMT stations, in Ceda) 
Rapids, figures it staged contes! 
and promotions at the rate o 
two a month. 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195' 



SOuSLa 





58.5% OF AUDIENCE 
IN INDIANAPOLIS ! 

59% OF AUDIENCE IN CHICAGO ! 



YANKEE DOODLE DANDY 
PULLS LIKE CRAZY! 

This smash hit musical is rolling up sensational ratings and 
stations are enthusiastic. Hugh Kibbey of WFBM wires: 
"YANKEE DOODLE DANDY SPECIAL SHOWING ON 
XMAS DAY HUGE SUCCESS. MUCH FAVORABLE 
REACTION AND ALREADY WE HAVE POTENTIAL 
BANKROLLER FOR REPEAT SHOWING JULY 4." 
Remember, this gold mine is available only up to July 5, 
for two showings only. 
Schedule one showing 
right away and a second 
for a perfect Fourth of 
July tie-in. It's your 
best chance for a local 
SPECTACULAR success. 



WFBM, INDIANAPOLIS 
Dec. 25, 5 pm to 7 pm 18.0 VS. 6.4, 3.4, 2.9 

WBBM, CHICAGO 
Dec. 6, 10 pm to midnight 28.4 VS. 8.7, 8.3, 3.0 



NEW YORK 

345 Madison Ave., MUrray Hill 6-2323 

CHICAGO 

75 E. Wacker Dr., DEarborn 2-2030 

DALLAS 

1511 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 

LOS ANGELES 

9110 Sunset Blvd., CRestview 6-5886 



U.CI.CI. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, INC 



Their biggest single event was the 
National Corn Picking contest, and 
second, a seven-month "Sports Sweep- 
stakes" in which 450 listeners shared 
prizes totaling $6,000. 

Other ideas at work: 

• Symbol for sale: WHAS-TV, 
Louisville, had to end its nine-week 
promotion campaign two weeks early 
because of too large a response. The 
station, during breaks, offered view- 
ers a 52-page color and game book 
featuring the station's symbol "Fis- 
bie." Total number sold: 25,000. 

• An international invitation: To 
Deputy Premier of Russia, Mikoyan, 
from Lawrence Rogers, president of 
WSAZ-AM & TV, Huntington- 
Charleston. Rogers offered to roll 
out the red carpet should Mikoyan 
and his party want to make a tour of 
West Virginia radio and tv stations, 
during his visit to the U.S. 

• In the interest of public service: 
WBTV, Charlotte, will televise a se- 
ries of 100 tv literacy programs de- 
signed especially to teach adults how 
to read and write. 



Station sale: The facilities of 
WBUF, the NBC-owned tv station in 
Buffalo, suspended last September, 
have been sold to WBEN, Inc., and 
Transeontinent Tv Corp. The 
WBUF studios will be occupied by 
WBEN-TV. and the antenna tower 
will be used by WGR-TV. 

Kudos: Red Cross, commercial 
manager of WMAZ-TV, Macon, Ga., 
awarded a 25-year diamond pin . . . 
Irwin Cowper, v.p. in charge of 
sales for WTIC-TV, Hartford, cele- 
brating his 25th anniversary with the 
Travelers Broadcasting Service Corp. 

On the personnel front: S. B. 
Tremble, appointed station man- 
ager of KCMO-TV, Kansas City . . . 
James Osborn, named general sales 
manager of WXIX, Milwaukee . . . 
Monte Strohl, to sales manager of 
Cascade Tv and William Grogan, 
to manager of KEPR-TV, Pasco, 
Wash. . . . Robert Sehulman, 
named director of special features 
for KING Broadcasting Co. . . . 
Harvey Spiegal, to director of re- 
search at TvB . . . John Neeck, pro- 
moted to engineering supervisor at 
WPIX, New York. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Con I "d from page 55) 

principles, I think, are timing or 
pacing, enthusiasm, variety, and 
meaning. 

I do not think the use of sounds 
merely as attention getters is a good 
idea. Production aids should identify 
or set a mood. In other words they 
should have some meaning in rela- 
tion to the program content. 

Regardless of the evident success of 
some modern forms of broadcasting. 
I think a good radio sound should 
have some variety. The same format 
over and over, with the same things 
done at the same times in the same 
way, cannot be endured for long. 

Enthusiasm is the life blood of all 
human endeavor. In the radio busi- 
ness where the entire impression de- 
pends on sounds, enthusiasm is most 
important. This does not necessarily 
mean shouting or playing the loudest 
possible music. Enthusiasm can be 
expressed in many different ways. 
There is contagious enthusiasm in a 
child's glee on Christmas morning 
and there is equal enthusiasm in the 
whisperings of a love smitten teen- 
ager on Christmas night. A good 
radio sound is dependent on enthusi- 
astic presentation. 

Last, but far from least, is timing 
or pacing. Those who remember old 
time vaudeville will remember that 
the show was always moving. As one 
act left the stage, another was on, 
and quickly. The audience was there 
to be entertained not to look at an 
empty stage. The same is true in 
creating a good radio sound. The 
audience did not tune in to hear 
"dead air." This does not mean that 
a frantic or feverish pace is necessary, 
but sound must continue to come 
from that loud speaker if the audi- 
ence is going to remain tuned in. 
Good timing is one of the main 
factors in building the impression of 
professional efficiency in the minds 
of listeners. 

In multiple station radio markets 
some specialization on the part of in- 
dividual stations is almost essential. 
A good radio sound can be created 
from many basic ideas or specialties. 
These differences create the individ- 
ual personalities or identities of the 
stations as a whole. The above factors, 
however, in my opinion, are necessary 
in creating a good radio sound re- 
gardless of the type of station. ^ 



"REP." SERVICES RATING 

[Cont'd from page 42) 

tion and rep in working together on 
recommendations. ' 

Station visits are a fundamental re- 
quirement in the intelligent servicing 
of problems, say the stations. 

Anthony J. Koelker, station man- 
ager, KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa, calls 
for "more station visits by reps to 
get first-hand information on market 
and station personality and opera- 
tion." And John F. Hurlbut, promo- 
tion manager of WFBM, WFBM-TV, 
Indianapolis, also wants "More rep 
salesmen's visits to stations to learn 
their modes of operation. Too many 
rep salesmen are not familiar enough 
with the local station's operating 
problems." 

Amplifying their comments on the 
primar - importance of sales, some 
stations had suggestions on methods: 

Herb Berg, general manager 
WWOK, Charlotte, N. C. wants them 
"to prove to timebuyers that they 
should look into a local market and 
get the real story of success rather 
than buying time by numbers." 

"For reps: Keep telling the sta- 
tion's story to everyone who will lis- 
ten. The assistant timebu^er may be 
the head timebuver nevt vear. And 
if the station is a good ore the "story 
is results, results, results." is the sug- 
gestion of Paul F. Eichhorn, pres. 
and general manager. WGRD. Grand 
Rauids. Michigan. 

In spite of some criterion of de- 
tails, most stations sesm happy with 
their national representative arrange- 
ment. "We value highly the advice 
and counsel of our rep," says one 
station manager. 

"We've had several good represent- 
atives in the past, but we rate our 
present agency best. Thev have ex- 
cellent agency entree and maintain 
a good research and prompt depart- 
ment — these are the two principal 
needs," comes from another pleased 
station. These are tvpical of many 
comments. 

"We look at our national rep as 
part of the local station." writes Fred 
Webb, manager WMFS, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. "They are in the large cities 
for us ... to sell our station . . . and 
we always try to give their sugges- 
tions on all matters concerning this 
station as much consideration as we 
do our own local salesmen and other 
personnel. ^ 



ro 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 




"Can't I go, too?" 



THE WORLD OVER 

KIM 



ROYAL DUTCH 
AIRLINES 




HUSBAND: "To Europe? But this is business . . . 

besides, we're not that rich!" 
WIFE: "You can save $300 on my ticket if we fly KLM." 
HUSBAND: "That so?" 

WIFE: "And the same for each of the children." 
HUSBAND: "Sounds good, but what about. . ." 
WIFE: "And we can see lots of cities over there — free!" 
HUSBAND: "Mmmmm . . ." 

PS. She went. First Class, too. Why don't you find out all about KLM family 
fares to Europe — including the substantial Economy Class savings? Remember, 
KLM features non-stop DC-7C service from New York, one stop from Houston. 

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, 430 Park Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 





SPONSOR • 10 JANUARY 1959 



71 



Mk 



BARDAHL 

[Cont'd from page 37) 

could put the racks, brochures and 
streamers there. Every ounce of con- 
sumer demand had to be milked with 
a promise of more to come." Bar- 
dahl's own advertising department 
prepares consumer brochures pegged 
to the seasonal pitch of the spots. 
Three full-color, easel-backed display 
cards are also provided yearly. (Na- 
tional advertising activities in all 
forms are supervised and coordinated 
by Miller, Mackay, Hoeck & Hartung 
out of Seattle.) 

(3) Maintaining a "fair trade" 
policy. "The dealer's markup," Bar- 
clay stresses, "is one of the most im- 
portant things we offer. Remove it 
and the structure collapses." Discount 
selling is verboten, and distribution 
must be rigidly policed to see that 
none occurs. 

Barclay set up a series of weekly 
sales meetings each Friday night. At 
the end of the 13-week test cycle, Bar- 
clay quadrupled the ad budget, giv- 
ing Freede $70,000 to spend from 
September to the end of '57, and the 



sales and tv expenditure curves were 
off on their parallel courses (see 
graph on page 37). 

Within six months, Barclay had 
cracked the New York market. The 
graph also shows how he allowed his 
sales graph to level out in the spring 
of '58. He did this to prevent a run- 
away growth that would put demand 
ahead of orderly distribution. Spring, 
being a slow period for additives, 
seemed to Barclay the right time for 
"consolidation." 

He increased his sales force to its 
present 30 and, to get the sales curve 
started upward again, doubled his ad 
budget in June. This meant that 
$150,000 was added to the quarter 
million already earmarked for 1958. 
This made several things possible : 

1 1 ) Pinpointing a larger male au- 
dience. Now able to plan ahead, the 
agency could purchase local spots in 
weekend, holiday and special sporting 
events televised nationally. 

(2) Reaching the off-duty service 
station operator. Not only would the 
expanded sports schedule do this, but 
a consistent late evening buy was 
now possible. One 60-second chain 



HERE'S HOW BARDAHL PARCELS SPOTS 



A typical three-station schedule 



DAYS 


SUN. 


MON. 


TUES. 


WED. 


THUR. 


FRI. 


SAT. 


STATIONS 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2:00-2:30 pm 






S 






































2:30-3:00 pm 












































3:00-3:30 pm 












































3:30-4:00 pm 












































4:00-4:30 pm 












































4:30-5:00 pm 






S 




































S 


5:00-5:30 pm 










































S 


5:30-6.00 pm 












































6:00-6:30 pm 












































6:30-7:00 pm 












































7.00-7:30 pm 


M 






















N 


















N 


7:30-8:00 pm 












































8:00-8:30 pm 








M 












M 
























8:30-9:00 pm 












































9:00-9:30 pm 














S 












S 


M 




M 












9:30-10:00 pm 
















M 






M 






M 




M 


M 










10:00-10:30 pm 




















M 






S 


















10:30-11:00 pm 






N 








S 
















N 










M 


N 


11:15 pm-1 am 








M 




P 






P 






P 






P 






P 


M 







LEGEND: Type of Spots — S - Sports N - News P - Personalities M - Participations In Syndicated Shows & Movies etc. 

Male consumer is primary audience for sports, news, adventure packages. Off-duty gas 
station operator is secondary audience for weekend sports, late evening personality show 



break spot per night, five nights per 
week was purchased in the Jack Paar 
Show. 

(3) Utilizing new spots. The Pat 
O'Brien spots were now available, 
and these c«uld be alternated w'.th the 
animated commercials with greater 
frequency. 

Typical spot distribution under the 
expanded budget appears at left. 

Rosy as the increased sports pros- 
pect seemed, Barclay and the agency 
were aware of one big stumbling 
block: sporting events are plum na- 
tional and spot buys for oil com- 
panies. "From the very beginning of 
our buying into sports shows," says 
Riedl and Freede media director Jan 
Stearns, "it was a matter of outguess- 
ing and anticipating." 

Miss Stearns recalls instances 
where she would herself warn stations 
of these conflicts when national gaso- 
line advertisers were sponsoring 
events in which she had ordered 
spots. "In one case," she remembers, 
"my warning went unheeded and 
when the spot finally did have to be 
yanked, an even better make-good 
was obtained elsewhere." 

Competing on a spot basis, how- 
ever, it's every one for himself. To 
beat the "big boys" to the advertis- 
ing draw. Miss Stearns keeps well up 
on even probable televised events, 
ordering her spots of any and all sta- 
tions that might possibly be carrying 
them. This strategy has resulted in 
Bardahl's inclusion in every type of 
tv sporting event, the agency says, 
without qualification. 

Informal surveys of station opera- 
tors by the Bardahl sales force prove 
conclusively that it is well worth the 
trouble. "Best remembered spots," 
Bob Freede reports, "are in the sports 
and late evening Paar show." 

These surveys are a new tool for 
merchandising to the retailer. The 
recall adds to his own awareness of 
Bardahl advertising and answers 
agency and client questions as well. 

Another answer: the zero to 85% 
distribution and $2,225,000 sales vol- 
ume with which Barclay expects to 
complete his current fiscal year after 
only 22 months in the New York 
market. The technique for accom- 
plishing it merely stems to the days 
of the "contraption" — lugging it 
around, setting it up, doing the spots, 
getting reactions from service station 
managers and following consumer de- 
mand right into the enemy camp. ^ 



72 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



Farmers 

BELIEVE 

Arnold Peterson! 

RADIO WOW — WOW-TV 
FARM SERVICE DIRECTOR 



BECAUSE he has broadcast daily for seven 
years on Radio WOW and WOW-TV! 

BECAUSE he is experienced in all phases of agri- 
culture. Born and bred on Nebraska farm . . . out- 
standing in 4-H work as youth . . . graduate 
University of Nebraska College of Agriculture. . . 
managed 135 Nebraska farms while with 
Federal Land Bank . . . currently an owner of 320- 
acre farm. 

BECAUSE he spent six years as a county agent 
working closely with farmers. Continues to work 
regularly with County Agents in WOW area. 

BECAUSE he is a top level organizer in farm 
projects. Has managed three state and national 
Corn Picking Contests for WOW. Program 
chairman of 1958 National Farm Directors 
Convention. Program chairman for upcoming 
Pasture-Forage-Livestock Association Conven- 
tion. Chairman Omaha Chamber of Commerce 
4-H Committee. 



ARNOLD PETERSON TELLS AND SELLS: 

If you want believable Arnold to sell for you, call 
any John Blair or Blair-TV man. 




ARNOLD PETERSON 
WOW and WOW-TV's 
New Farm Director 



REGIONAL RADIO 



CHANNEL 6 



WOWwWOW-TV 




John BLAIR, 

Representative 



BLAIR-TV, 

Representative 



OMAHA 
NEBR. 

CBS 
Affiliate 



Meredith Stations are affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



J ONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



73 



HAVIN-T 

LOOKED UP! 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



SPECIALIZED NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 



With 100% Negro programming per- 
sonnel, KPRS is effectively directing 
the buying habits of its vast, faithful 
audience. Your sales message wastes 
neither time nor money in reaching 
the heart of its "preferred" market. 
Buying time on KPRS is like buying 
the only radio station in a community 
of 128,357 active prospects. 



1,000 W. 1590 KC. 

KPRS 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 
for availabilities call Humboldt 3-3100 



Represented Nationally by- 
John E. Pearson Company 



= 


SALES 1 


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WESTERN 


MONTANA 


























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V. 

















TIMEBUYERS: 
YOUR JOB IS 
TOO TOUGH! 
IF YOU'RE NOT USING 

KMSO ch 13 

TO SELL WESTERN MONTANA 

• 42,000 TV HOMES 

• ONE DOLLAR PER 1000 

• 80% UN DUPLICATED 

CALL OR WRITE 
NAT. REP. GILL-PERNA 



KMSO — MISSOULA, MONTANA 





Hugh L. Lucas has been appointed v.p. 
in charge of all tv/radio client services for 
Campbell-Ewald. He will also serve on that 
agency's operations committee. Lucas joined 
C-E as an a.e. in 1955, after an association 
with Foote, Cone & Belding's Chicago office, 
where he was a vice-president in charge of 
creating marketing programs in food, ap- 
pliances, drugs, cosmetics, etc. Thomas B. 
Adams, Campbell-Ewald president, said that the move was a part of 
the agency's program for a future as a "total marketing center." 

Arnold E. Johnson has been named a vice 
president of Needham, Louis & Brorby, 
Chicago. Formerly, he had been director 
of broadcast facilities at that agency. John- 
son joined NL&B six years ago as head of 
the timebuying section of the media depart- 
ment. A veteran in Chicago broadcasting 
circles, Johnson had been with NBC's 
Chicago office for 19 years. At the time he 
shifted to NL&B, he held the position of television/radio sales service 
manager for the network. He is married and lives in Wheaton, 111. 

James E. Szabo was recently named sales 
manager of WABC-TV, New York, flag- 
ship station for the ABC network. Szabo 
began his sales career with Adam Young, 
rose to the position of sales manager for 
that organization before moving to John 
W. Loveton Productions as national sales 
manager. In 1955, he moved to ABC 
where he was associated with WABC-TV 
for the next two and one-half years. Since June, 1958, Szabo has 
been a.e. with ABC's sales department. He lives in Elmhurst, L. I. 

Peter C. Levathes, v.p. of media for 
Young & Rubicam will head up the agen- 
cy's expanded radio/tv dept., according to 
a recent announcement by George H. Grib- 
bin, president. The new department func- 
tions will combine programing and time- 
buying. Levathes, who has been with Y&R 
since 1953, will continue, for the time be- 
ing as director of the media dept. Prior to 
joining Y&R, he was head of tv for 20th Century Fox. Robert P. 
Mountain was named vice president in charge of new business. 





74 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 1959 



Your Salesman for More Than 700,000 

CALLS ON SIGHT 
BIGGEST,RICH 




TELEVISIOH 

WINSTON-SAL EH 



S|)NSOR 



Put your salesman where he can make the most 
calls at less cost. Buy WSJS-television's 713,062 
TV sets in 75 Piedmont Counties in 
North Carolina and Virginia. 



10 JANUARY 1959 



^ Winston-Salem 
[|][Q for s Greensboro 
^ High Point 



AFFILIATE 



Call Headley-Rced 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Be careful of program formulas 

As business men in radio and tv advertising, nearly all of 
us enjoy looking at detailed facts and figures. 

There is something comforting and reassuring about graphs 
and charts and tables and dollar listings. They seem definite, 
tangible, factual. They provide us with a sense of security, 
confidence, and practicality. 

But there are dangers in facts and figures, too. Dangers 
that, in our enthusiasm for them, we may wholly lose sight 
of the realities on which they are based. 

This week, on page 31, sponsor publishes a comprehensive 
report on the current state of network tv programing. You 
will find there a summary of program trends, ratings, casual- 
ties, and costs, a practical roundup of basic program informa- 
tion which every media man, account executive and adver- 
tising manager should have at his fingertips. 

We believe you will be interested in tracing the decline of 
the quiz shows, the continued strength and durability of the 
westerns, the rating power of the top 25 network programs. 

But we publish this report with a special word of caution. 
Behind all these facts and figures lie certain all-important 
human values. If you disregard them, you may easily make 
some tragic business errors. 

It is quite true that public interest in tv programs seems to 
fall into certain broad categories or "types" — Westerns, musi- 
cals, comedy, drama, etc. 

But we must never forget that a program "type" does not, 
in itself, insure popularity. Even more important than any 
formula is the skill or lack of it with which an individual 
program is handled. 

Behind every truly great program lie the talents and abili- 
ties of at least one truly great person. Unless you can find 
real creativeness, imagination and integrity in your producer, 
director, writer, or star, no amount of formula thinking about 
programs will do you much good. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A recognition that, 
in every phase of radio and tv, it is individual 
creative ability which has brought us our out- 
standing successes, and which will insure the 
future health and welfare of the air media. 



76 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Print media booster: During the 
newspaper strike which hit N.Y.C. 
over the holiday season, a Ketchum, 
MacLeod & Grove agencyman got a 
frantic phone call from his sister. 
"They would pull a strike," she com- 
plained, "just when I get a Mynah 
bird for a gift. Have you got any 
papers at all for the cage?" 

Real McCoy: In an age conditioned 
by tv commercials to "realness" (rea 
beer, real cigarette, etc.), we report 
the experience of a New York adga 
who dropped into her church to view 
the Christmas creche, comprised of 
posed members of the congregation. 
Our adgal heard a woman spectator 
say to her child, "Look, dear, they 
breathe real air." 

'58 roundup: Cleaning out our desk 
for the New Year, we ran across some 
1958 flotsam we had intended to 
use but didn't. So here's a full 60 
seconds of 10 Second Spots from last 
year — A panel of glamour girls chose 
as one of "The 10 sexiest bachelors 
on earth" tv sportscaster Mel Allen 
on the grounds that "his vibrant 
voice would be nice to hear first 
thing in the morning." . . . When 
KFAB, Omaha, misread "Wednesday' 
for "Thursday" in announcing a de 
partment store sale, the store wa: 
cleaned out of sale merchandise a day 
early. ... To pick up the kine of 
Buffalo tv show and deliver it to i 
New York City ad agency, a fool 
messenger for Mercury Service Sys| 
tems covered 600 miles in one morn 
ing — by plane. ... In Hollywood 
KMPC's Dick Whittinghill experi 
mented with subliminal advertising 
whispered into a mike at frequen 
intervals, "Santa Monica's footba 
team can beat Bakersfield" — and the 
did though Bakersfield was highl 
favored. . . . Paul Parker, of Phil 
delphia's WIP, while taping his sho 
from a Navy blimp, suddenly foun 
himself in the unenviable role of 
passenger on a runaway when t! 
lines to the mooring mast snappe 
but went right on delivering a me; 
product commercial. ... In Vienna 
a court permitted a wife to produc 
as divorce evidence a tv show i 
which her husband momentaril 
wandered past camera with a blond 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 




PROGRAMMING 



9 in a Series - Radio Renaissance in Dallas 



From Ships 



Satellites 

: ; /X • • l 




Aerojet's big Sacramento plant 
employs 12,000 workers to man- 
ufacture potent rocket fuel. W* 






Port of Stockton, the State's biggest inland 
seaport. Serves 41 steamship lines. 








The healthy industrial growth talcing place 
in the KBET-TV dominated Sacramento- 
Stockton market includes many of America's 
leading companies. The Port of Stockton last 
year handled an all-time record of sea-going 
cargo. Similar inland port facilities under 
construction at Sacramento will serve new 
big industries such as the Aerojet-General 
Corporation, producers of the fuels that give 
U. S. satellite-carrying rockets their "big 
push". Among other big payrolls in Sacra- 
mento are Douglas Aircraft, Procter & Gamble 
And in Stockton . . . International Harvester, 
Fibreboard Products, Johns-Manville. 
Capital investment in industrial expansion 
increased 85.71% in Sacramento, over 100% 
in Stockton, between 1 950 to 1 957. In the 
same period , industrial employment increase 
95.1% in Sacramento, 71% in Stockton. 



KBET-TV CHANNEL 10 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BASIC ^H. CBS OUTLET 



Call H-R Television. Inc. fr»r Curr***** A\*nllc 



17 JANUARY 1959 
20< a copy • S3 ■ ymmr 






SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS 



teen hearing a lot 
fcout the Storz Stations, 
glich ones we 

Ing?" 



y#~with KOMA, Oklahoma City — 
reare 5 markets where all you have 

T-d<ko get the big audiences — and the 
rmlts — is to pick the Storz Station. 

Kf, Minneapolis-St. Paul. 275 first 
hours; only 85 for 2nd station. First in 
| audience. (Pulse.) 50,000 watt station, 
50,000 watt personalities. Call John 
Co., or GM Jack Thayer. 

Kansas City. 3-way dominance! Far 
Bit in every T 4 hour of every metro and 
vey. Audiences in the 40% bracket. 
icn and women than the next 3 stations 
d. Call John Blair & Co., or GM George 
Ktrong. 

., Oklahoma City's only 50,000 watt 
And clear-channel, too! Watch KOM \ 
■ward the top — and take you along with 
John Blair & Co., or GM Jack Sampson. 



i\ 



WTIX, New Orleans. New 52-countv Area 
Pulse shows WTIX first 360 out of 360 j4'hours; 
first morning, afternoon, evening. 2,500,000 
people now in the WTIX area since the change- 
over to 5,000 watts and 690 kc. Call Adam Young 
Inc., or GM Fred Berthelson. 

WQAM, Miami. First 240 of 240 >4 hours. 
(Latest South & Central Florida Area Pulse.) First 
280 of 280 daytime J4 hours. 



(Pulse.) First 
hours. 

(Hooper.) Call John Blair & Co., or GM Jack 
Sandler. 



with 40.5% and 264 of 264 daytime ' j 






The Storz Stations 

TODD STORZ, President 

Home Office: Omaha 







WILL MEDIA 
AND MARKETING 
DLEND? 

sponsor studies the 
changing media mar- 
keting set-up in tod.i 
agencies and what may 
happen in the future 

Page 29 

Merchandise your 
tv star to sell 
your products 

Page 32 

Tv Basics: Fall 
net shows at the 
halfway mark 

Page 37 

Special SPONSOR 
report on 1959's 
tv commercials 

Page 47 



DIGEST ON PAGE 



K-7 AMARILLO RATINGS 

UP 44% 

. . . AND . . IN JUST 30 DAYS . . . 

OCTOBER 30 New ownership and management premieres all-new pro- 
gramming and operational plan for KVI1-TV against two strongly en- 
trenched competitors, both on the air since 1953! 

NOVEMBER 30 One month later, AKB begins regular survey, after the 
new K-7 pattern in operation only 30 days! 



RESULTS 

I 



• K-7 OVERALL SHARE OF AUDIENCE UP 44%! 

• K-7 6 PM-MIDNIGHT SHARE OF AUDIENCE UP 51%! 

• K-7 6 TO 10 PM SHARE OF AUDIENCE UP 68%! 




The dynamic* new approach to television in Amarillo taken by KVII-TV (K-7) 
saw the initial ratings in more than 30 hours of programming DOUBLED, and 
ratings sharply increased in more than 90% of the rated time periods. K-7's 
Movie Spectaculars are the highest rated movies IX THE MARKET! K-7's 
"All Aboard For Fun" is the highest-rated local children's program IN THE 
MARKET ! 

IN TOTAL RATING POINTS . . 
K-7 is FIRST on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursdays be- 
tween 6 and 9:30 PM ! 3 DAYS OUT OF 7 . . in just 
30 days time. 

How did K-7 do it so quickly? By combining the know-how and many 
years of experience of its new management team — an exciting and ex- 
panded program schedule — and the most forceful promotion campaign 
in the city's history! 

Those are only the FIRST reports ! The flexibility of the NEW K-7 
permits the addition of new and powerful vehicles where a weak point 
appears. Add up these first results — remembering- that K-7 is now 
full power with 316,000 watts— and you've got a STORY! All done, 
by-the-way, without gimmicks or give-aw r ays. Get the COMPLETE 
AND EXCITING story of the new K-7 (KVII-TV) from your Boiling 
Man. 

kvii-tv a 



C. R. 'DICK' WATTS 
viCE-PRES. AND GEN. MGR. 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



J 







it takes TALENT brother . . . and 




\ 



THE 
BIG 
DIFFERENCE 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 



■ 



RADIO 

IS 

TALENT 



TALENT THAT SELLS 

on the station where the most 
important sound is your commercial 



WPEN 



WPEN programs believable, selling, loca 
personalities 24- hours a day, 7 days a week 
Talent — that's why more local and more national 
advertisers buy WPEN than any other 
Philadelphia radio station. 

Represented nationally by GILL-PERNA 

New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 



© Vol. 13, No. 3 • 17 January 1959 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Will media and marketing bend? 

29 Quietly, without fanfare or hoopla, marketing and media departments are 
moving closer together. What is significance for media jobs of future.' 1 

How to use a spot tv star 

32 Mary Ellen's Jams increases distribution by merchandising its star to 
chain buyers, store managers and consumers in a five-market promotion 

Were we too tough on the oil boys? 

34 sponsor Commercial Commentary column which called oil "the worst- 
advertised big industry" draws congratulations, complaints from readers 

Parti-Day checks winter ice cream sales 

35 As 26-week Wisconsin test of day tv nears half-way point. Parti-Day 
Topping investigates effect of 25-30% seasonal ice cream sales drop 

A different image in every port 

36 Champale malt beverage makes a virtue of its lack of uniform appeal, 
uses radio to tailor its approach to specific groups in each market 

Sponsors faithful to network tv 

37 Year-end tally shows that in eight out of 10 program changes, clients 
held on to same time period. Comparagraph of network programs and costs 

sponsor asks: How do you sell against newspapers? 

44- With ANPA intensifying its effort to minimize tv beside newspapers, 
station men tell how they have taken up the offenses against print 

SPECIAL SECTION: TV COMMERCIALS 

47 sponsor reports on what's ahead in tv commercials for 1959 with a 
16-page special section covering the implications of tape, some new 
film developments, what's on the horizon in new techniques, the new 
creativity, plus spot news on film and tape commercials production 

57 Directory of 100 commercial producers 

A handy clip-out-and-save listing of the top 100 producers 
of film commercials, their addresses and telephone numbers 



FEATURES 

1 O Commercial Commentary 
65 Film-Scope 
24 49th and Madison 
72 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmaker of the Week 
72 Picture Wrap-Up 
68 Sponsor Hears 



1 7 Sponsor-Scope 
84 Sponsor Speaks 
70 Spot Buys 
84 Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 
8 2 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
67 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasu rer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 
Harold Hazelton 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiqqins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay. Asst 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Manaqer 

Dorris Bowers; George Becker; Laura Datre; 

Priscilla Hoffman; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publication- , ■ -J 

Audit of Circulations Inc. LUjAj 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-808° 
Piinting Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 
2nd class matter on 29 January 1948 at the Balti- 
more postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 









The 
SALESMAN 

makes a 
difference . . . 



and so does the 
STATION! - 



'oil can bet on it — a reputable, believable 

alesman will make less noise — and make more sales — 

han a carnival pitch man. 

iO,000-watt WHO Radio is the most believable, effective 
alesman in this State. Iowa has confidence in WHO 
T 'ecause WHO has confidence in Iowa. We have proved 
ur faith for decades — by building and maintaining the 
reatest Farm Department in Mid-America — the greatest 
lews Department- — a fine, professional Programming 
department that does a lot more than play the "first 50" 

3! s a result, more Iowa people listen to WHO 
( lan listen to the next four commercial stations 
tmbined — and BELIEVE what they hear! 

f course you are careful about the salesmen you 
re. You of course want to be equally careful 
>out your radio salesmen. Ask PGW for all the 
cts about Iowa's GREATEST radio station! 




WHO 

for Iowa PLUS ! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 




ntetf* « 

iih IP 



*fe 



WHO Radio is part of Central Broadcasting Company. 

which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Des Moines, WOC-TV, Davenport 

Affiliate 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., National Representatives 



In' 



I 



'itNMlli 



17 JANUARY 1959 



If 

You Want 

KING SIZED 

Coverage 

In King Sized 

PORTLAND OREGON 

Market 







and 

SPORTS 



and Always 
Get 

KING SIZED 

Results for 
Advertisers 







NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The appointment of Nat Wolff as a vice president in the 
radio I tv department of Y&R brings back a veteran showman 
to the agency after a hiatus of more than two years during 
which he worked for NBC and was partner in a tv film firm. 

The newsmaker: One of the most highly-respected talent 
and program specialists in the tv business, Nat Wolff brings years of 
experience to an agency which billed an estimated $95 million in 
broadcasting last year. He was a talent agent for years in Holly, 
wood, later became a writer, director and producer of radio shows. 
Among his credits was radio's Halls of Ivy, starring the late Ronald 
Coleman, a personal friend of Wolff's as well as a client in his talent 
agent days. 

In returning to Y&R, Wolff will operate in the program area. He 
will report to Peter G. Levathes, 
recently named director of the 
radio/tv department. Wolff's pre- 
vious association with Y&R makes 
him a familiar figure to the agen- 
cy's clients, particularly General 
Foods, General Electric and Bris- 
tol-Myers, all of whom consider 
him a top-notch operator in pro- 
gram development. Levathes, in 
addition to running the depart- 
ment, will handle a good part of 
the client contact chores. 

Wolff comes back to Y&R as a 
program specialist at a time when 
agency production activities are in 

general at a low point, a situation likely to remain permanent. 
However, development of program ideas, discussions with talent 
and negotiations with the networks remain key agency functions. 
And they are functions at which Wolff excels. 

Wolff's previous tenure at Y&R ran from 1951 to 1956, during 
which time he was a vice president. He left to join NBC as director 
of program development. In 1957, Wolff became a partner in the 
Don W. Sharpe Enterprises, which has developed such shows as 
Peter Gunn, Yancy Derringer and The Green Peacock. He will re- 
linquish all outside interests, however, and work full time for the 
agency and its clients. 

Operating for years in a business sometimes cluttered with sharp 
practices and raffish characters, Wolff won the reputation of a gentle 
man and a man of his word. He is not a restrained type, however 
and is often given to streaks of high-pitched excitability. His wife is 
the well-known British actress, Edna Best. W\ 




'_ . "■ V '. 



" ■ 



Nat Wolff 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195' 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 



WARM is first in DALLAS 




Dallas, Pa. that is. 



robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



national representatives of radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N.Y. 
PLaza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Russ Bldg. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

YUkon 2-9760 



DALLAS: 

211 North Ervay Bldg. 
Dallas, Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 



ST. LOUIS: 

Syndicate Trust Bldg. 
915 Olive St. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 



PONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



■ 



THE 1958 STORY. 



In 1958, America 



grew and so did American television and so did America's 
first television network. Starting its second decade of com- 
mercial service, the NBC Television Network placed new 
benchmarks along the path of progress: 

NBC introduced "Continental Classroom," the first 
nation-wide television course. Carried by 149 stations, 
accepted for full academic credit by 265 colleges and uni- 
versities, viewed by 270,000 Americans, this course in 



Atomic Age Physics was universally described as a 
experiment in the nation's interest. 

NBC News, through its 300 correspondents static 
around the world, responded to the explosive events of 1 5 
with a 20% increase in news coverage. 

NBC Special programs, covering a broad range of er 
tainment and informational forms, paced the entire indu i 
with nearly 100 separate productions. 

NBC flew the proud ensign of color almost alone, 





ting a record total of 664 hours of color programs. 

NBC logged a record 300 hours covering a variety of the 
uion's foremost sports events. 

NBC's average daytime program increased its audience 
I 5' c more homes; its average evening program by 10% 
B«e homes. 

NBC reached its all-time high in gross time sales, sur- 
ging 1957 by 13%. A record total of 205 sponsors gave 
KK the largest gross dollar increase of any network. At 



year's end, NBC led all networks in evening sponsored time. 
The true measure of a network's greatness lies in the 
totality of its service. One measure of that totality is the 
recognition accorded a network's programming by respon- 
sible independent groups with different interests. In 1958 
NBC, its programs and its personalities, received more 
aivards than any other network. 

NBC TELEVISION NETWORK 






1 1 

I ■ 







\ 



$ 







J_i is a Layman, 

Outside of our "biz." 
Our terms are confusing 

Alongside of his. 

It's true. The advertising profession 
has terminology that's as confusing to 
the layman as medical phrases are to 
most of us. Cumes, cost per M and 
average aud. mean nothing to him. 

Furthermore, all the layman knows 
about media selection comes through 
preference: whether specific media 
meet his own individual tastes. 

For more than 36 years, KHJ Radio, 
Los Angeles, has been programming 
with an eye toward satisfying those 
tastes. We believe that complete pene- 
tration of any market can only be 
achieved through penetration of each 
individual mind. 

To that end, KHJ's foreground 
sound features news, commentary, 
sports, drama, discussion, variety and 
quiz programs designed to hold the 
layman's attention not only during the 
program but through the commercials 
within and around it. 

Never underestimate the variety of the 
laymen's tastes in Greater Los Angeles. 
Here is a medium programmed to sat- 
isfy them all. 



KHJ 

RADIO 

LOS ANGELES 

1313 North Vine Street 
Hollywood 28, California 
Represented nationally by 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 




Timebuyers 
at work 




Russel I. Hare, research and media director, Tilds & Cantz, Los 
Angeles, feels that the dividing line between media research and 
market research is relatively artificial, in agreement with Bill Dekker, 
media v. p. at McCann-Erickson. "Most media have themselves 
done a fine job of market research in recent years," Russel says, 
"greatly simplifying the work of 
our own department. Close co- 
operation among media, their rep- 
resentatives, and our agency has 
resulted in more accurate and 
comprehensive research, much of 
which has helped us in overcom- 
ing many marketing problems." 
Russel points out that while the 
research function in advertising 
encompasses a great deal, it should 
always first isolate and define the 
nature of the market, from dis- 
tributor to consumer, to be a valuable advertising tool. "Media 
buyers, with a clear picture of the people they must reach," Russel 
says, "can then purchase time accordingly. We have found by 
working in this manner budgets become a framework in which to 
develop an effective advertising program, rather than a limitation." 

Jack E. Dube, Cole Fischer Rogow, Inc.. New York, points out the 
distinct factors and problems that must be considered in deciding 
the best media plans for a new product's initial campaign. "The 
nature of the product, how it is marketed and its merchandising 
potential are just some of the considerations in buying," Jack says. 

"With a new product, it is often 
best, budget permitting, to initiate 
your campaign in television where 
you can get the benefits of visual 
impact. Then, once this has been 
established, to back it up with an 
extensive radio campaign, capital- 
izing on imagery transfer." Jack 
feels that merchandising is as im- 
portant with a new product in a 
virgin market as the broadcast 
schedules themselves. "It is the 
merchandising, especially the 
point-of-sale displays," Jack says, "that give the product the mo- 
mentum it needs for first impression with wholesalers and retailers 
as well as with customers. Without the cooperation of the wholesalers 
and retailers a product will never move, so we weigh every station 
merchandising plan carefully to make sure we will have the edge." 





SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



THE 








We believe that the most wildly successful show on earth means little, if each minute 
devoted to the sales message does not hold and move your audience. . . . With us, show 
business is business— business that shows a profit for our clients. N. W. AYER & SON, INC. 




The commercial is the payoff 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 




THE ONLY MEDIA 

EFFECTIVELY REACHING 

THE VAST . . . 

COLUMBUS 

GEORGIA 

MARKET 

25% PENETRATION 

WEEKLY 

38 COUNTIES 



Call HOLLINGBERY 

FOR 
RATE DETAILS 
PRIME AVAILS 
PACKAGE PLANS 
TOP RATINGS 
MARKET DATA 
PROGRAMMING 
PENETRATION 



ClaufiL 



COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 



Cull HOLIINCIIHV (S}^?| 



by John E. McMillin 



Commercial 
commentary 




Build thee more stately mansions 

Just in case you hadn't noticed it, the new 
"men-in-white provisions" of the NAB code went 
into effect on 1 January 1959. 

So far, though, the impact of the new ban on 
impersonating doctors in tv commercials has 
been something less than bomb-like. 

The Voice of Anacin still snarls "What do 
doctors recommend?" The now defrocked but 
still frenzied Anacin announcer still snarls back, "Yes, what do doc- 
tors recommend?" And the old pitch continues without a hitch in 
pretty much the same old way. 

Obviously, neither Anacin nor other tv drug advertisers are greatly 
bothered. Obviously, too, the NAB's code action has not succeeded 
in cleaning up tv's medical jungles. 

This, of course, is too bad and in a sense it is pretty discouraging. 

Yet it is exactly what any experienced advertising man could have 
and should have foreseen. When it comes to codes of advertising 
censorship, a clever copywriter can outwit a careful lawyer any day 
of the week. 

He can always achieve the effect he wants without violating the 
letter of the law. And if he doesn't believe in the spirit of a code, 
no amount of restrictive verbiage will slow him down. 

This essentially is what has happened with NAB's well-intentioned 
men-in-white provision. And where does it leave us now? 

Well, I think that those of us who sincerely feel that our tv screens 
are over-clogged with medical and anatomical offensiveness, should 
stop kidding ourselves. 

We should stop passing pious resolutions and engaging in windy 
debate. The time has come for us to haul out of our arsenal (and it's 
going to take courage to use it) our most fearful and devastating 
weapon — the nuclear weapon of laughter. 

Laughter, properly directed, is a lot more lethal than any legisla- 
tion, more deadly than any qode of ethics. And both drug advertis- 
ing and drug advertisers are peculiarly vulnerable to it. 

Devils, drugs and diagrams 

They're vulnerable because most patent medicine advertising is, 
and always has been rooted in a kind of psychological silliness. 

If you have ever written drug copy, you know that it is different. 
It is not simply (and honestly) concerned with telling a consumer 
about some product benefit. It carries in addition certain dark, emo- 
tional overtones, a formula of mystic mumbo jumbo that dates back 
to the days of the tribal medicine man. 

The drug formula is simply this: 1) You, a miserable sinner, are 
possessed by horrible devils. 2) I, a mystifying magician, can give 
you fast, fast, fast relief. In selling drugs you build up a sense of 
sin and guilt in the customer, and a sense of hokum in the product. 



10 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



THE CAT IS OUT OF THE BAG! 




Brightest 
Television 



FELIX 
THE CAT 



260 brand new adventure cartoons 
are now in FULL PRODUCTION 
for TV debut in September, 1959 

Unique continuing format of 
FOUR -MINUTE episodes . . . 
NEW stories . . . NEW characters . . 
designed specifically for television . . . 
produced in beautiful Eastman Color 
or striking black and white. 



Audition screenings by appointment: 



Call or wire: 

Richard Carlton, Vice President 

in Charge of Sales 

TRANS-LUX TELEVISION CORP. 

625 MADISON AVE., N. Y. C. 

Phone: PLaza 1-3110-1-2-3-4 




TV 



-J- THE MOST IMPORTANT NEW TV SHOW FOR CHILDREN IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS I -j- 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



11 




"Sunny" 
Knows 



"Sunny" knows WSUN de- 
livers more radio homes, at 
the lowest cost per home of 
any station in the heart of 
Florida.* 



WSUN is programed for 
service . . . and for sales, 
and has been making friends 
in Florida for 31 years. 




620 KC 



Tampa 



St. Petersburg 



National Rep: 
VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 

Southeastern Rep: 
JAMES S. AYRES 



*NCS 2 



12 




Commercial commentary continued 



At least that's the traditional way to do it, and the technique is 
centuries old. 

To establish a sense of brooding, ugly sin, drug advertising has 
always gone overboard in the ugliness of its presentation. Remember 
those dreadful black-type newspaper ads that shouted, "Piles? 
Hernia?" Well they were the exact first cousins of the B.O. com- 
mercials that shriek, in effect, "You stink!" Their purpose was 
the same. 

To build up the sense of mystery and hokum, drug advertising has 
always gone in for abstruse medical depiction. Those tv announcers 
who drool over the liver bile and sinus drainage diagrams are direct 
descendants of the carnival pitchman who sneered to his assistant, 
"Show those illiterate peasants our gorgeous painting of the human 
digestive tract." 

Sin and magic are the time-honored ingredients of the patent 
medicine pitch. They're so old they wear whiskers. 

And I think it is both pathetic and humorous that, in 20th cen- 
tury America, so many great big pompous, financially proud and 
socially respectable corporations are still using such devices. They 
ought to be spanked. 

The Anonymous Adman 

Which brings us to another point — who is a corporation? 

Who is really responsible for a drug company's advertising? Let's 
have no nonesense about a "team." 

I believe that any advertiser, appearing as he does before the pub- 
lic, stands in the same non-privileged position as a politician, an 
actor, a writer or performer. He should be liable to public criti- 
cism. But who is the anonymous adman we are going to criticize? 

Maybe we can solve the problem by getting specific. I, personally, 
find the Anacin commercials very offensive. But I don't think it's 
the fault of the Anacin announcer. He is just mouthing words he has 
been given. 

Nor can I really blame the Anacin copywriter. Or the account 
executive, Dan Rodgers of Bates or even Rosser Reeves, the agency's 
board chairman. They're merely carrying out policies. 

No, I've got to go straight to the makers of Anacin, to the White- 
hall Pharmacal Co. And there I've got to go past ad manager and 
sales manager and various v.p.s, right up to the very top. 

The president of Whitehall is Kenneth Bonham. Since he holds the 
title I must assume that his is the ultimate responsibility for Anacin 
operations. And it is to him I must address my critical remarks. 

I am speaking here, not as an institution to an institution, but as 
man to man, as one critic to one advertiser: 

/ have never met you, Mr. Bonham, and based on what I have seen 
and heard on tv, I don't think I ever ivant to. You sound to me like 
a loud-mouthed, ill-mannered, humorless, repetitious bore. I deplore 
your tactics. I don't want you in my living room. 

Nevertheless, I am curious about you, Mr. Bonham, about your 
goals, ambitions, and philosophy. How will you answer when a tiny 
voice asks, "What did you do in the Great War of Life, Daddy?" 

Will you say, "I spent my manhood, trying to scare hell out of the 
masses with corny diagrams of leaping sparks and pounding ham- 
mersr 



Build thee more stately mansions, my soul! 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



HE 





TENCE 




This is the most expensive 
yawn in America, the one that 
kills a network TV program. 

Last year it killed one out of every two 
Bvening network shows. 

So far this season — and it's far from 
Jver — more than twelve have bit the dust. 

The cost of these false starts and fast 
pops is staggering. You just can't fail 
(tore spectacularly in advertising . . . and 
more expensively. 
A/hat to do about it? 

Couldn't part of the answer lie in an 
advertising agency that assumes responsi- 
bility for the development and growth of 
!he property, as well as negotiating for it? 



This, of course, is easier said than done. 

In our case, it means a department of 92 
specialists solely dedicated to building the 
popularity and assuring the success of our 
clients' programs — before, during, and 
after their introduction on the air! 

Immodest of us, we know 

That these efforts are reasonably suc- 
cessful is indicated by the fact that 83% 
of the nighttime network shows Benton 
& Bowles had on the air last year are still 
on. This, we are immodest enough to 
point out, is considerably better than the 
average survival rate of 50%. 

Put another and equally self-congratu- 
latory way, 5 of the top 25 television shows 



last fall were Benton & Bowles shows. 

Now, let's face it. We wanted to gloat a 
little in print about this record. But we also 
wanted to shake you up a little. We want 
you to do a little thinking about what real 
television "pros" within an agency can 
do to cut down on the gamble that is TV. 

We believe an advertising agency should 
do as good a job of keeping the entertain- 
ment you pay for fresh, bright, and inter- 
esting as the advertising it produces. 

If this concept interests you at all, we 
are singularly receptive. 

Benton & Bowles, Inc. 

666 Fifth Avenue. New York 19. N.Y. 



'he best part of this ad are these clients: General Foods Corp. • Proctor & Gamble Co. • Pepperell Manufacturing Company • Association of American Railroads 
imerican Express Co. • Avco Manufacturing Corp. • Norwich Pharmacal Co. • Carling Brewing Co., Inc. • Philip Morris. Inc. • Mutual Of New York 
Continental Oil Co. • H. C. Moores Co. • Railway Express Agency, Inc. ■ International Business Machines Corp. • S. C.Johnson & Son, Inc. ■ Florida Citrus Commission 
Jeneral Aniline & Film Corp. • Western Union Telegraph Co., Inc. • Borden Company • Kcntile, Inc. • Schick Incorporated • Allied Chemical Corp. • The Eve. harp Pen Co. 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1939 



13 



)id you Whittinghill this morning? Umpteen thousands of 
■outhern Californians did... promptly at 710 on their radio 
ials, where KMPC's Dick Whittinghill is the constant delight 
f all those who prefer their early listening (6 to 10 AM) 
unny side up. / Whatever and whenever you choose to adver- 
ise, KMPC's programming adds a sizzle that means more 

ource: 8-County Pulse, Southern California area; September-October. 1958. 



listeners (the most in Southern California radio) and, 
all, more sales. For facts, call the station or AM Radio Srt 



KM 




: 



GOLDEN WEST BROADCASTERS, LOS ANGE, 







•grid's greatest disc jockey!' KSFO's Don Sherwood pays (and most listened-to) station in the San Francisco-Oakland 
I arming tribute to... Don Sherwood. Pleasantly enough, area. For unabashed details, contact us or AM Radio Sales. 

> pjuilarity with morning listeners (6 to 9 AM) matches the 

mn his tongue. According to the latest tabulation : almost 
llore audience than the runner up. / KSFO is proud to 

p wit who wins, prouder still to be the most ingenious 

■■'seofSa n Fran cisco. Sep tember-October. 1958. GOLDEN WEST BROADCASTERS, SAN" FRANCISCO 




Looks easy, but . . . 



>v 



takes plenty of know-how 



m 






.& ft 




li/Mfc 











He appears nonchalant— but to keep that baton twirling at 
the head of the parade takes plenty of Know How. And to 
keep a radio station consistently heading the parade in any 
major market is infinitely more difficult. In radio today, 
effective programming and effective selling go hand-in- 
hand. The many complex elements from which alert station- 



THIS NEW BOOK is helping advertisers intensify sales re i 
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tremendous selling power. Price $1 postpaid. Order 
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management builds commanding leadership in audiee 
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which give Spot Radio its tremendous selling power, i 
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Cincinnati WCPO 



Miami WQAM 

Kansas City WHB 

New Orleans WDSU 

Portland, Ore KGW 

Denver KTLN 

Norfolk-Portsmouth- 
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Louisville WAKY 

Indianapolis WIBC 

Columbus WBNS 

San Antonio KTSA 



Tampa -St. Petersburg WFLA 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy.. WTRY 

Memphis WMC 

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Omaha WOW 

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16 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1955 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



17 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The Station Representatives Association recognizes that national spot radio 
needs a promotional retread joh, and it's going to do something constructive about it. 

The plan being mapped out calls for a full-fledged drive. The main objective, simply 
put, will be to evolve a definitive presentation to bring national spot radio into its 
proper perspective as an instrument for selling goods and services in 1959. 

Money for the project will be obtained through a special assessment on SRA mem- 
bers. The task of putting the presentation together will be shared by an outside research 
organization and research directors in SRA member firms. 



Pharmaceuticals is mulling tv saturation plans for several products more or less 
in the testing stage. 

Meantime it's buying spot radio for Skol in some Southern markets. 



Two sizable pieces of business went into national spot radio's books this week. 

PHILIP MORRIS: Prime I.D.'s for 52 weeks in quarterly cycles via Burnett, starting 
21 January. The campaigns bring the old Johnny call back to the air. 

BLUE BONNET MARGARINE: A four-week flight— which may be extended to 13 
weeks — at the rate of 25-30 spots a week out of Bates, using the top 33 markets. 



Air media sellers needn't despair over the tendency among many national advertis- 
ers to make their lists of top markets smaller and more selective. 

According to some Madison Avenue marketing men, the turning of the tide is not far 
off because competing manufacturers are searching around for "opportunity" mar- 
kets which today often are overlooked. 

The explanation you still get for the shortening of market lists is this. The marketing 
investment per market has gone up 30-40% the past several years; so the resulting 
trend has been to focus on those areas which add up to around 65% to 75% of po- 
tential sales. 



Watch for a strong surge toward the single rate to develop in the Southeast. 

A SPONSOR-SCOPE correspondent, reporting from Atlanta this week, says that a num- 
ber of the more important stations there are trying to curb the practice among south- 
eastern agencies of insisting on local rates for their national and regional accounts. 

These stations see the single rate as a logical solution for what they deem in essence 
to be a rate-cutting problem. 

Atlanta-located reps, now organized in their own association (see 22 Nov. 1958 
issue, page 39), have embarked on a program for integrating themselves actively in south- 
eastern advertising affairs. 

The steps: (1) Awarding prizes for the best tv and radio commercials to agencies in 
the region, and (2) staging periodic luncheon forums for agency people. 



PONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Tv stations in the top markets haven't yet made much headway in converting 
the high demand for minutes into 20-second spots and I.D.'s. 

The demand for minutes — all over the board — become overwhelming during the lat- 
ter months of 1958, but sellers of spot had hoped that the pressure would soften with the 
turn of the year. 

Here's the background: 

Advertisers found during the recent business letdown that minute copy packed a solid 
sales wallop; and even though things have picked up substantially since then they're re- 
luctant to abandon a winning tactic. 

However, there's been something of a breach in the insistence. Some sponsors are 
accepting combinations of minutes and/or 20 seconds and I.D.'s. 



The high-profit cake mixes still are operating in a competitive turmoil. 

Look for the big ones to expand their lines, flavors, and whatnot more than ever 
this year. The idea is to capture still more supermarket shelf-space from less aggres- 
sive competitors. 

The Saturday Evening Post (BBDO) is using a new type of media buy (for 
itself) to promote some special editorial feature: It's buying announcements on ABC, 
CBS, and NBC Radio concurrently. 

The spots will plug the Kathryn Murray biographical series, starting in the 14 
February issue. 

Arbitron's multi-city reports have run into a temporary snag in the Chicago 
area: 

The Bell Telephone Co., it now appears, won't be able to deliver the sample 150 
homes before 1 February because the lines can't be coordinated in terms of the required 
loops. 

Meantime, Nielsen, who also has instant viewing-report plans, will bring his own elec- 
tronic device out of the laboratory for a trade demonstration next month. 



Radio stations with a high quotient of listeners in the lower-age brackets are 
puzzled by the continued preference by life insurance companies of the traditional 



"prestige" station. 



Stations that cater to the younger element argue: The best prospects for life insur- 
ance should be people in the 20's and early 30's who have just begun to raise a flock 
of kids. 



There's going to be a bothersome recession hangover in the advertising strate- 
gy of the hard-goods people. 

These manufacturers — and also some kinsmen in other fields — discovered during the re- 
cent setback, when their marketing budgets were necessarily tight, that they could get grati- 
fying results by confining their promotions and advertising to seasonal and short- 
range pushes. 

From this emerged, say Madison Avenue marketers, a tendency to adopt the patterns 
that worked successfully in a tough climate as the proper strategy for better times. 

But this growing of concept of "crash" programs certainly isn't going to be welcome 
among media and ad agencies. 

For media it creates alternate waves of riches and want, while the need for mo- 
bilizing lots of manpower on a "crash" program has a two-fold effect on agencies: (1) it 
takes people away from other accounts, and (2) the profit margin is clipped. 



18 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

The tv networks have their work cut out for them this spring to fill the widen- 
ing gaps in their commercial schedules. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's check this week shows the total time available for sale per network 
to be: ABC TV, 3 hrs. 20 mins.; CBS TV, 3 hrs. 5 mins.; and NBC TV, 3 hrs. 20 
miiis. 

The shows you can buy into, by network: 

ABC TV: Donna Reed, Naked City, Disney, Meet McGraw. 

CBS TV: Derringer, Name That Tune, Hit Parade, Playhouse 90, Rawhide, Invisible 
Man. 

NBC TV: Bob Cummings, Steve Canyon, Steve Allen, Ellery Queen, Black Saddle, Cimar- 
ron City, Northwest Passage. 

Item: NBC TV is conjuring with the idea of dispensing with It Could Be You 
and Closed Doors altogether and filling that Thursday 8:30-9:30 p.m. period with a full 
hour of adventure or mystery. The network might even hring back Suspicion. 

It could be a sign of how tv network winds will be blowing: ABC TV this 
week added two clients to its list of regional sponsors. 

Boyer International Labs (H-A Hair Arranger) bought an alternate week of Meet 
McGraw, with the Atlantic seaboard excluded; and Hudson Pulp & Paper took on an alter- 
nate half hour of Disney for just the East. 

The Hudson deal works out perfectly for the network, because Hills Bros, has the 
western loops for the same alternate half hour. McGraw is without an eastern sponsor. 

NBC TV has applied an official label to a new way of buying a time and talent 
package for a limited run: It's called the Scatter Plan. 

The plan is this: Say an advertiser wants to spend a couple hundred thousand dollars 
for a special promotion in March. The network makes up a combination of shows in 
which he can participate over the month and also furnishes an estimate of the 
accumulated homes. 

Ordinarily a discount doesn't go with this package. 

Lever is raising its list of sponsored tv networks shows to eight with alternate 
buys in The Texan and Gale Storm. 

Both programs will be used primarily to support new Lever products, namely. 
Praise, a competitor of Zest, and Handy Andy, a contestant in the "Lestoil" field. 

By the time Handy Andy commercials show up on Gale Storm (7 February), the brand 
will be in distribution in 60-70% of the potential market. 

Lever's start on The Texan is 9 March. 

NBC Radio has taken its initial promotional step toward inducing sponsors of 
tv specials to use that network as a filler-in of the gaps between specials: 

A presentation based on a hypothetical study prepared by Nielsen shows the ac- 
cumulated tv and radio audience Hallmark would have piled up had it bought 10 
minutes of commercials on NBC Radio in a four-week interim of Hall of Fames shows dur- 
ing September-October. Here are some statistical quotes from the study: 

1) The first Hall of Fame this season got a rating of 25.7 and reached 12.652,000 
homes. 

2) The unduplicated homes that 10 minutes of commercials on NBC Radio 
would have reached is estimated at 5,268,000, with a rating of 10.7. 

3) A combination of both the Hall of Fame broadcast and the radio commercials 
would account for a total of 16,246,000 unduplicated homes and a rating of 33. 

4) Total new homes for Hallmark messages: 3,594,000. 

5) Total tv homes in above figure which did not view Hall of Fame: 2,530,000. 

6) Time and talent per Hall of Fame show costs $375,000 gross: four weeks of 10- 
minute radio commercials would come to $40,252 gross. 



iONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



19 



^ ] SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

What may develop into a hefty piece of business for spot tv this year is the 
Colorforms campaign which Kudner has just got under way. 

Markets will be increased gradually, with the possibility of the spot expenditure 
going to $300-350,000. The tee-off list: 10 markets. 

Marketing note: Perhaps tv participation has had a lot to do with it, but this type of 
children's activity game has been making extraordinary headway the past couple 
years. 

(For a case in point, see experience story on Play-Doh, 13 September 1958 sponsor.) 

A new complication involving unions has been tossed into the videotape pot. 

The Radio Television Directors Guild is demanding re-use payments fees for taped 
commercials a la AFTRA members. 

Position of the networks: The Screen Directors Guild is working under a flat 
payment and there's no reason why RTDG shouldn't continue to do likewise. 

Meantime, on another front the RTDG will seek a new general agreement on work- 
ing conditions, terms, etc. Members have voted 319 to 72 to authorize their negotiating com- 
mittee to call a strike — if and when it may be necessary. 

Playhouse 90 probably will get to the end of the line this season. 

It isn't only that the series has become somewhat of a drain on the CBS TV ex- 
chequer; it's that the network is considering converting the Thursday time to other 
uses anyhow. 

One possible substitute would be something that BBDO has been advocating for 
the past year: 

A steady home for DuPont's Show of the Month and other specials. 

The spot might even come in handy as a showcase for super-documentary and similar 
programs. 

It's interesting to note what an extra minute of tv commercial costs when an 
advertiser goes from a network alternate half-hour to 20 minutes every week (this just hap- 
pened in the case of Lever and Pharmaceuticals). 

The switch was from the Jackie Gleason to Rawhide— or from three to four minutes 
of commercials over two weeks. 

The show cost remains about the same, but time costs are up 10%. Hence the 
bill for that additional minute is just 10% more than for three minutes. 

Nothing so underscores the trend in regular network tv away from identity to 
"wide reach" as this: There are only seven weekly shows whose sponsors have but 
a single product to sell. 

The seven programs: The 20 Century (Prudential), Dinah Shore (Chevrolet), Patti 
Page (Oldsmobile), Lawrence Welk (Dodge), Ernie Ford (Ford), the Plymouth Show 
and Voice of Firestone. Note that five of the seven represent divisions of corporations that 
sell other makes. 

Obviously those seeking the value of high identity and association have swung 
over to the specials type of programing. 

Statistical note: The weekly time and talent costs for the foregoing seven shows adds 
up to around $690,000. 

For other news coverage in this issue, * see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 70; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 72; Washington Week, page 67; sponsor 
Hears, page 68; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 82; and Film-Scope, page 65. 

20 SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195 



i 



. H -i . ■v#i 



In the 20 counties which make up the 
Greater Washington Area, more people listen to WTOP 
than any other radio station.* Clear proof 
that in Washington the IMPORTANT one is . . . 



*Ujr 



ilse: 20 county Washington area study 



ku 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

An affiliate of the CBS Radio Network 
Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



■ated by THE WASHINGTON POST BROADCAST DIVISION: 



I * 



WOP Radio, Washington, D.C. 



WTOP-TV, Channel 9, Washington, D.C. 



WJXT, Channel 4, Jacksonville. Florida 



ALREADY BOUGHT IN OVER 118 MARKETS! 



BALLANTINE BEER 

for 21 Eastern Markets 

ST. LOUIS 

Central Hardware 

ARMOUR & CO. 

in 7 Markets 

LUBBOCK, TEX. 

Furr's, Inc. 

BIRMINGHAM 

Burger-Phillips Dept. Store 

HEILEMAN BEER 

for Chicago and all of Wisconsin 



WISN-TV- Milwaukee 
WHTN-TV - Huntington, W. Va. 
WLW-T — Cincinnati 
KID-TV - Idaho Falls 
WCBS-TV - New York City 
WALA-TV- Mobile 
KOMO-TV - Seattle 
KOLD-TV - Tucson 
KHVH-TV- Honolulu 
KEY-T— Santa Barbara 
KGHL-TV- Billings 



CITIES SERVICE OIL 

for Grand Rapids — Kalamazoo 

NORFOLK 

Midway Furniture 

RAINBOW BAKING CO. 

for Houston 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 

South Carolina Electric Co-Op 

MISS GEORGIA DAIRIES 

for Atlanta and Macon 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Adams Contsr. Co. 
and Ideal Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners 






ZiVS NEW hT 



STATIONS, AGENCIES 

AND ADVERTISERS 

ARE RUSHING TO SIGN... 




DANE 



XX 



j JBS" 



vbs 



WFMJ-TV — Youngstown 
KTSM-TV El Paso 
WLW-D - Dayton 
KBAK-TV - Bakersfield 
WTVJ - Miami 
KTUL-TV- Tulsa 
KLRJ-TV- Las Vegas 
WSJV - Elkhart, Ind. 
KSL-TV-Salt Lake City 
WDSU-TV - New Orleans 
WKY-TV- Oklahoma City 
WICU-TV-Erie, Pa 
KVAR - Phoenix 
WSM-TV- Nashville 
KOVR — Stockton-Sacramento 
KVOS-TV - Bellingham, Wash 
WFGA-TV - Jacksonville, Fla. 
WLW-C -Columbus, O. 
KPTV - Portland, Ore. 
WLOS-TV- Asheville, N. C. 
and many others 



BOLD 

EX PLOS»VE ACT* 








AND INTRODUCING 

JOAN 
MARSHALL 

A HEROINE YOU'LL 
NEVER FORGET! 




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L U ALWAYS R EM BMBE«|| -.[-// 

VENTURE 



EVERY WEEK 

a half-hour 
of EXCITEMENT 
and SUSPENSE! 




nthe 



COLORFUL CARIBBEAN 











*- / 



( 




the Balance is in your favor when you buy 

K-NUZ... No. 1 in HOUSTON! 




HIGHEST RATING 
FOR ADULT 

AUDIENCE WITH 

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INCOME! 



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PER 

THOUSAND 

BUY! 

< g — ? 



74% of K-NUZ Audience is Middle and Upper Income 

Special Pulse Survey (Apr. -May, 1958) 

84% of this Audience is ADULT Men and Women 

Nielsen (June, 1958) 

CONSISTENT TOP RATINGS YEAR AFTER YEAR 
. . . Still the LOWEST COST per Thousand Homes! 



(Sources: Average Vi nr - rating 6 AM-6 PM 
Mon.-Fri., Pulse, Apr. -May, 1958. SRDS One- 
Time One-Minute Rate for Each Station.) 



*££lo- 




©m** 



CW3 



K-NUZ 

/ Houston's^ 24-Hour 
— Music a x ncLNews. 



K-NUZ $1.13 

Sta. "A" $1.36 

Sta. "B" _ $1.30 

Sta. "C" $2.48 

Sta. "D" $2.53 

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Sta. "G" $1.59 

Sta. "H" $9.88 



National Reps.: 

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New York • Chicago 

Los Angeles • San Francisco 

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Southern Reps.: 
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Dallas • New Orleans • Atlanta 

In Houston: 

Call Dave Morris 

JA 3-2581 



24 




49th an 
Madisoi 



Thought for Viceroy 

Last night I was watching tv and once 
again heard a Viceroy-smoking Piano 
Player patiently explain that he is not 
really a Piano Player at all, he is an 
Airlines' Pilot. 

One thing you can say for Viceroy 
this time — for once they've come 
through with a commercial that is 
entirely believahle! 

Lnfortunately, it came on the heels 
of a holiday season during which we 
all got a good mental picture of 
America's largest group of Airlines 
Pilots turning into not only Piano 
Players, but also Golfers, Skiiers, 
Guppy-fish Breeders, what have you. 
During a very crucial time, they've 
been doing everything short of flying 
their planes like they're supposed to 
be. 

Wouldn't it have been a good idea 
for Viceroy to ground this particular 
commercial until the public-relations 
air clears for the Pilots' Association? 
Or are the residual fees for Thinking 
Men so high that they have to keep 
using the commercial in spite of the 
ironic train of thought it starts in the 
mind of the viewer? 

Henry Marx, copy dir. 

Cappel, Pera & Reid, Inc. 

Orinda, Calif. 



Images and character 

I enjoyed reading your recent edi- 
torial, "Flesh, blood and a corporate 
image," but I wondered as I finished 
it whether you might not have ex- 
tended the ideas presented. Are we 
not concerned here even further with 
"old-fashioned" values such as in- 
tegrity, quality of product and truth 
in advertising? 

Some of the "characters" in the 
advertising business need to be re- 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 






minded that character can pay di\i- 
iends, morally, socially and eco- 
nomically. 

Harvey Olson 

vice-pres. -public relations 

WDRC 

Hartford 

Radio wallops 

Thought your article (20 December 
1958, p. 26) "Radio Wallops News- 
papers In New Grocery Shopping 
Study" was terrific! 

How much are reprints? 

Walter H. Stamper 

commercial manager 

WAPO 

Chattanooga 

We at WBUY were very much im- 
pressed by the article '"Radio Wallops 
Newspaper in New Grocery Shopping 
Study" which was published in the 
20 December, 1958 issue of sponsor 
magazine. 

J. Ardell Sink 

asst. manager 

WBUY and WBUY-FM Radio 

Lexington, No. Carolina 

Reading sponsor, of course, is man- 
latory for everybody in the advertis- 
ing business, but there are times when 
certain articles are bound to create a 
yery strong interest in one individual 
ir another. 

The article "Radio Wallops News- 
japers in New Grocery Shopping 
Study," on page 26 of the 20 Decem- 
ber, 1958 issue, created a great deal 
>f interest from my point of view, 
ind now I am wondering if it would 
>e possible to get twelve reprints of 
his article, in one form or another. 

Nelson B. Noble 

President 

Noble Broadcasting Corp. 

Boston 

• SPONSOR has had so many requests for re- 
rinls of this article that they are now avail> 
ble for 15c a copy in quantities of 1-49 and 
Oc per copy for any above that. 

coder benefits 

. . We have enjoyed your magazine 
erj much, and have been able to 
enefit from many of the ideas pre- 
-nted. Would like a little more on 
>cal radio if it's possible. 

Phil G. Wise 

Comm. Mgr. 

WHO 

Frankfort, Indiana 




new ser/es. 



more later. 



THINGS ARE^ 





POPPING 



Jumping. Hopping. WBZ's rolling up the ratings. With 
bright new personalities. Popular new program lineup. 
Like Program PM. Long Bostons most-exciting nighttime 
radio show, it gets an extra touch of offbeat humor from 
new M.C. Phil Christie. Warm, likeable, imaginative — he 
projects the kind of personality listeners go for. One more 
reason why diak-axeset on Boston's Most Popular Station. 



'ONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 





°j AL 10 30 
BOSTON 



WB2» SPRINGFIELD 



YVestinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc. 







Our finest award 



: ivavd 

1 clhrs 

CIV 






""•"-"-** 



rnmcnf 



;> i >, vi'(( > \ 



^^■-■■■- ■■■ ■-|-|-;j-Tini|ii i 



I nanh y&u jotTnG Toys 

you SGht m£ a/^en a" 

I sti'il hawe fh^m, 




26 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195^ 



is written in pencil 



Of course we're proud of the silver and b 



VOTPff 



medals, the handsomely lettered scrolls that make up the more than 
lOO major awards won by Crosley Broadcasting Corporation. 

But our finest award is written in a child's hand on lined paper. 
It simply says, "Thank you for the toys you sent me when I was in 
the hospitl. I still have them." 

In our 36 years of broadcasting and over 10 years of telecasting, we 
have been privileged to make many contributions to the progress of 
the industry. Our public services, our showmanship and technical skills 
are widely known. But our finest achievement, acknowledged by a 
child, is keeping heart and humanity in broadcasting and telocastlng. 

'Wherever there Is a WLW- Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Columbus, 
Dayton, Atlanta— thorn is also the warm and frtandly spirit of a station 
that puts service to the community above all other considerations. 



WLW- 1 

Television 
Indianapolis 



WLW-D 

Television 
Doyton 



WLW-T 

Television 
Cincinnati 



1 



WLW-C 

Television 
Columbus 



WLW- A 

Television 
Atlanta 



Cro-.li-y Broadcasting Corporation 



Manufacturing Corporation 












' 




SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



27 



Its Easy 
To Pick 
A Winner 
In Memphis 




Its Channel 3 First By All Surveys 



At WREC-TV the finest local pro- 
gramming is combined with the 
great shows of CBS Television to 
constantly support our motto: "In 
Memphis There's More to SEE on 
Channel 3." Survey after survey 
proves it ... so will the results of 
your advertising effort. See your 
Katz man soon. 



Here are the latest Memphis Surveys showing 
leads in competitively rated quarter hours, 
sign-on to sign-off, Sunday thru Saturday: 



A.R.B. 


Pulse 


Nielsen 


May '58 


Nov. '58 


Nov. 9-Dec. 6 '58 


(Metro Area) 


(Metro Area) 


(Station Area) 


WREC-TV 201 


293 


275 


Sta. B 122 


96 


66 


Sta. C 53 


29 


70 



WREC-TV 

Channel 3 Memphis 



Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 




28 



SPONSOR f> 17 JANUARY 1959 










SPO NSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



Will media and marketing blend ? 



^ Keep an eye on these 10 top agencies as they 
streamline staffs to fit the marketing revolution 

^ Today's department reorganizations may change 
the whole character of agencies in the future 



I here are many ways to skin a 
at and as many ways to organize an 
idvertising agency. But all ways 
►oint to one inevitable result: a closer 
ind closer marriage between media 
ind marketing. What effect this may 
lave on media and marketing jobs 
n the next decade may be surprising. 



The chart on the following page 
describes in brief the set-ups of media 
departments in the 10 agencies that 
are tops in broadcast billings. As 
will be apparent, there are a number 
of different structures, a variety of 
operational approaches. The ma- 
jority of the top 10, for example, 



purchase media under a group, or 
semi-integrated plan: a few adhere 
to the traditional specialist buyers, 
and a few have gone into structures 
based on all-media buyers. In some 
agencies, the buyers are responsible 
to associate media directors, in others 
to media or group supervisors: some 
use one rating sen ire. others another. 
All of these things point up the in- 
genuity of agencies in setting up the 
kind of systems which best serve 
their clients. 

The significant column, however, 
is the one labeled "Marketing Depart- 
ment/' Not all of the agencies have 
marketing departments per se. Some 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



29 



niiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiim 



Rank 

in 

Air 

Billings 



1 



2 



7 



8 



INTEGRATION IN MEDIA AND IN ITS RELATION 1 



Agency 



JWT 



Mc-E 



Y&R 



BBDO 



BATES 



B & B 



BURNETT 



D-F-S 



AYER 



Media Buying 
System 



All-media 
except junior level 



Groups 
Buyers specialize 



All-media 



Groups 
Buyers specialize 



Semi-integrated 
Buyers specialize 



Groups 
All-media 



Groups 
All-media 



Groups 
Buyers specialize 



Departmentalized 
Buyers specialize 



Media Department 



Seven associate media directors plan for all med 
Many of top buyers are all-media; juniors speciali 



For seven years has used group system ; groujU 
headed by associate directors. Buyers speciali] 



String of all-media buyers operate under four assl 
date directors; a fifth buys outdoor and transpo 



Semi-integrated; in their account groups buyt 
specialize. Media supervisors expert in all med 



Another semi-integrated set-up; buyers speciali 
in one or other media, report to media supervise 



Five associate media directors, six assistants sup< 
vise account groups ; buyers are trained in all met 



Five media groups. Supervisor and assistant of eal 
is all-media as are some buyers. Specialist buys C 



Semi-integrated system; account groups under I 
sociate directors on all-media. Buyers special 



No account groups as such; departmentalized sti 
ture. Each buyer is a specialist in his own medi 



10 



COMPTON 



Groups 
Buyers specialize 



Staff and line set-up. Buyers assigned to grou 
report to head buyers, not to associate direct! 



Media buying at HQ only. '"Sponsor estimate. Note: Column headed "No. of associate media directors" also shows those of equivalent function in agencie 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! 11 i ill ii iiiii;" iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiii iiimiiiiiii 



call their own equivalents "plans 
boards" or "merchandising depart- 
ments." There are cases where there 
is no marketing set-up at all but 
where the account head serves as a 
sort of marketing brand manager. 

But by its own or any other name, 
the marketing department influences 
all other departments of an agency 
which is hardly surprising since, in 
the client company, it is marketing 
which influences sales, advertising, 
and even production divisions. The 
strategy of the agency media man is 
often motivated, for example, by a 
marketing problem of a certain re- 
gion; the creation of the copywriter 
is often spurred by the marketing 
man's suggestion of what special fea- 
ture of a product puts its best foot 
forward. 

A striking example of the growing 
appreciation of marketing as a mate 
for media is the recent realignment 
at Leo Burnett Co. in Chicago. About 
a month ago. Burnett set up a market- 
ing services division, headed by 



Executive Vice President Joseph 
Greeley. Under this new umbrella are 
three departments: marketing, media 
and research. Vice President Leonard 
Matthews (formerly head of media) 
is v.p. of marketing services. The 
media department is headed by Vice 
President Thomas Wright; general 
research department is under super- 
vision of Vice President John Coul- 
son. It is the responsibility of Greeley 
and Matthews to coordinate the three 
departments. 

The significance of this move at 
one of the most dynamic agencies of 
today portends, if one wants to specu- 
late, a time in the not too distant 
future where it will be almost impos- 
sible to tell a marketing man from a 
media man. It is already apparent 
that marketing men are learning 
more about media and that media 
men are learning more about mar- 
keting. As agencies assume more 
responsibility for moving a client's 
product, it is inevitable that media 
and marketing draw closer together 



— almost to the point where they 
blend completely. 

The Burnett agency move is 
garded by many as the most dram 
and giant step to date in integratii 
media with marketing. Certainly it h\ 
the most recent development in ar 
emerging pattern that started to takt 
shape within the last decade — sincfj 
the coming of tv, in fact. 

The introduction of the all-medh 
buyer around 1952 was perhaps th< 
first visible evidence of the stronj 
drift toward integration of depart 
ments within the agencies. Until then 
the major ad agency media depart 
ment was something of a study i« 
individual specialization, and it wa 
not uncommon for seven or eigb 
media specialists to be working o> 
the same account. 

Y&R pioneered a move to all-medi 
buying (See "The all-media buyer £ 
Y&R," sponsor, 9 August 1954) i 
1952. Under this plan, buyers wer 
trained in all-media instead of jut 
one, which automatically eliminate 



30 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195 






Ililllll 

VARKETING BEGINS TO SHOW AT TOP 10 AGENCIES 



Marketing Department 



Hfiite department. In effect, has a second 
riting operation — research department 



ting provides basic data for audience 
ch; Media selects to provide audience 



ing group here is merchandising de- 
nt which cooperates closely with media 



,ting department under one director 
wo assistants works alongside media 



ing department tie with media here 
'y on a horizontal cooperation basis 



narketing functions by merchandising 
mt group heads are brand managers 



ntegration. Media, marketing and re- 
all make up marketing services div. 



artment per se, but there's always 
ng authority Dr. Lyndon 0. Brown 



re he plans-merchandising department is 
ier-all strategist in an ad campaign 



ig department, media and all other 
answer to account handling group 



Media Research 



Media research div 
sion of media dept. 



Media research is not 
a part of media dept 



Media research an 
autonomous dept. 



Media research divi- 
sion of media dept. 



Two; one part media, 
other part of agency 



Media research a part 
of media dept. 



Part of media at level 
of media supervisors 



Part of Dr. Brown's 
research department 



Media research div 
sion of media dept. 



Media research divi- 
sion of media dept. 



Marketing Director 
Media Director 



Ward Parker v. p. marketing 
Arthur Porter v. p. media 



Wm. C. Decker dir. media 
Daniel Kinley chmn. mk. bd. 



Ed Smith dir. merchandising 
Pe+e Levathes v. p. tv/radio 



Ralph Head v. p. marketing 
Fred Barrett v. p. media 



W. W. McKee v.p. m&m 
E. A. Grey v.p. media 



Austin Johnson v.p. merch. 
Lee Rich v.p. media 



Joseph Greeley v.p. mrktg. 
Thomas Wright v.p. media 



Louis Fischer v.p. media 



Hans Carstensen v.p. merch. 
Leslie Farnath v.p. media 



William Nevin v.p. mrktg. 
Frank Kemp v.p. media 



No. of 

Assoc. 

Media 

Directors 



7* : 



No. in 

Media 

Hq. 



125* 



115 



165 



140 



160** 



10! 



120 



100** 



17 



No. in 
Media 
0.0. T. 



I!'. 



18' 



35 



10 



15 



other names, i.e.: "media supervisors," etc. 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllll! 






i old problem of print buyers ask- 
g for larger magazine and news- 
iper allocations and timebuyers 
zhting for more air money. 
The practice of all-media buying 
oved the media buyer into a spot 
here, of necessity, he had to become 
strategist in selling goods rather 
an a mere purchaser of space or 
ne. 

Meanwhile other agencies were 
so streamlining their media opera- 
>nals both to handle the complica- 
ms of a fast-growing tv medium 
id to meet the increasing product 
>mpetition in the market places. 
r\an Houston (then Sherman & 
arquette) set up an all-media sys- 
m similar to Y&R. In 1952, B&B 
aligned its forces coming up with 
vertical, or group, system. This 
pe of account group set-up with all- 
edia buyers and specialist assistants 
orking under associate directors 
ho are expert in all media too, has 
iught on fast. 
Even in the agencies where the 



traditional departmentalized (or spe- 
cialist) media set-ups have been re- 
tained, there has been a great deal of 
streamlining that moves the business 
of timebuying closer to a true mar- 
keting function. 

Because while agencies have been 
improving and integrating media 
staffs and because while the media 
departments were shuffling the furni- 
ture around, a very noisy neighbor 
moved in next door — the marketing 
department. He has livened up the 
neighborhood tremendously, and the 
livening process is far from done. 

Already the neighbors have come 
to know a lot about each other. The 
marketer has learned, for example, a 
lot about broadcasting while the 
media man has learned a lot about 
the purchasing climate of a South 
Bend or Denver. As thev move closer 
into the sphere of "togetherness," 
they become a formidable team. 

At B&B, for example, a media 
buyer is expected to understand the 
purchasing patterns of a market, the 



price structure of the product he is 
selling, even, in some cases, how to 
use the product's package design in 
his campaign. 

There was a time when an excep- 
tional timebuyer was one who knew 
the topography or geography of a 
market for the sole purpose of what 
station's signals were getting where. 
Now he is beginning to face a need 
to know much more: What industries 
are there and how are they doing? 
When do the shifts begin and stop 
work? Are any surrounding markets 
being linked to this one bv new roads 
or bridges? What is the industrial 
picture in those skirting markets? 
Where are new housing developments 
going up and are new supermarkets 
going up along with them? How are 
competitive products selling in the 
market? 

As yet, many media and m i ■ ting 
departments claim very distinct 
boundaries of duty, but realignments 
appear to be erasing gradually the 
boundary lines. <^ 



'ONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



31 



^v 



L 



^V 




-I' 



«> 



1. CHAIN BUYER: Ralph's Larry Cole is pitched by (1 to r) star, Burrud, sales mgr. Bailey, a.e. Whitehead, L.A. Broker Roy Sadie 



HOW TO USE A SPOT TV STAR 






^ Mary Ellen's Jams gets more than usual horsepower 
from syndicated show in five-market press-sales junket 

^ Pitching chain buyers as well as store managers and 
consumers, firm nabs new accounts, increases distribution 



H 



low much off-the-screen mileage 
can you get out of a tv personality — 
over and above just showing him off 
to the fans? 

Ed Sullivan (Mercury, Eastman 
Kodak) and Bill Lundigan (Chrys- 
ler), of course, are classics in intra- 
company pepping up. But now Guild, 
Bascom & Bonfigli has come up with 
a solid example at the regional level 
of how a star can help sell all facets 
of distribution. 

Here was GB&B's setup: 



It had a client, Mary Ellen's Jams 
& Jellies, who was launching a new tv 
show in five of its 10 markets (Los 
Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, 
Phoenix, Salt Lake). The show itself 
was a filmed travel-adventure series 
called Treasure, packaged by its star, 
Bill Burrud. 

GB&B's idea was to put Burrud to 
work on a complete promotional rou- 
tine - — ■ including actual salesmanship 
among chain buyers and wholesale 
jobbers. But before going ahead with 



ithe scheme blindly, the agency work© 
out a completely coordinated plan t 
avoid possible pitfalls, embarrass 
ments and social blunders. 

Biggest social blunder could be th 
size of the team calling on the buyer 
To make it work, the delegatic 
would have to consist of account e 
ecutive, sales manager, star and loc 
broker. But there's a point of vie 
among chain buyers: they don't lik 
delegations. Custom has two men 
the most making a sales pitch. 

Obviously a suitable routine woulj 
have to be worked out proving to 
buyer that some benefits could accru 
to him from the double contingenj 

A.e. Bob Whitehead and sales mar 
ager Bob Bailey weighed the pros anj 
cons with Mary Ellen's president, 
Morris Browning. Browning agree 
it was worth trying. Burrud wa 



32 



SPONSOR 



10 JANUARY 195 



game, so brokers in the five cities 
were notified to make appointments. 
This had to be done well in advance 
primarily because dates have to be set 
at least three weeks ahead, also be- 
cause Burrud's p.r. man had to sched- 
ule press activities and tv appear- 
ances around the meetings. 

Rehearsals were soon underway. 
Here's the sequence worked out for 
the pitches, with each man's role as- 
Signed. Running time: 15 minutes. 

1. The Broker. Knowing the buy- 
er, he ushers the three men in, 
smooths over the inevitable surprise 
at the number of people making the 
pitch, assures him each has a definite 
Btory to tell, then introduces: 

2. Sales Manager. Bob Bailey 
makes it clear that: Everyone gets 
same deal in push for increased dis- 
tribution, runs over the results of a 

| Los Angeles tv test that upped sales 
Jfl.9% in supermarkets, then plants 
the fact that Mary Ellen's is about to 
do something "new and different." 
With that cliff-hanger, he introduces: 

3. Account executive. Bob White- 
head is armed with two props: A 52- 
week contract signed bv Walter Guild 




Planning arc (] to r) a.e. Bob Whitehead, 
Burrud, sales mgr. Boh Bailey, Mary El- 
len's pres. J. Morris Browning (seated) 

and a sales brochure. Purpose of the 
contract: to remove any skepticism 
about a jam and jelly firm doing a 
year-round job (the industry pattern 
is in-and-out, tie-ins with other ad- 
vertising, etc.). The brochure — dif- 
ferent for each market — outlines the 
commercials, coverage of the station 
and illustrates the show. With inter- 
est about the show aroused, White- 
head introduces: 

4. The star. Burrud breaks the 
hard sell of the presentation with a 
friendly remark about the privilege — 
ordinarily denied to "talent" — to 



meet with people in the grocery trad-'. 
If the atmosphere is rifdil for it, a 
light joke is tossed in (Burrud works 
out some naive yet knowing trade 
references). Then a run-down of the 
show, how it was conceived, why it's 
different, local angles i local sites used 
in various episodes). The pitch (and 
the meeting) ends with Burrud giving 
the buyer an old coin retrieved from 
a sunken frigate, suggesting he carry 
it with him as a good luck charm. 
Children or grandchildren? Here are 
a few for them. 

This is how the biggest and most 
important phase of the venture was 
worked out. 

Another aspect was contact with 
supermarket managers. These meet- 
ings would be informal, usually a 
matter of inquiring when they were 
in a store if the manager was around. 

At this level, Burrud could be a 
big help getting point-of-sale pieces 
in. A "Berry Treasure" piece formed 
a perfect tie-in with the show. But 
to sell it properly he should under- 
stand some of the store manager's 
problems. 

(Please turn to page 78) 





2. STORE MANAGER: Star Bill Burrud (r) shirtsleeves it with 

Frank Sonner, manager of an Alexander's market in Los Angeles, 
learns alioul stock rotation. Star helped pitch for larger displays 



3. CONSUMER: Yinnie Alto is one consumer Burrud isn't getting 
through to. Dovetailing press parties, tv appearances and p.a.'s with 
grocery trade appointments was major headache of three-week junket 



33 



x& 



cO 




v ^ s ,,a- ^*. 



8*** 



WERE WE JUST 
TOO TOUGH 



.■ft' ,s " 



**« 









ON THE OIL BOYS? 



^ SPONSOR gets congratulations and complaints for 
column calling oil "The worst advertised industry" 

^ Among those heard from : D-X Sunray, D' Arcy, ANA, 
and Donald Deskey, plus many "don't quote me's 



9,-," 



by John McMillin 

I wo days after the sponsor issue 
of 6 December appeared I had a note 
from an old friend, the radio/tv v.p. 
of a leading advertising agency. 

"Don't quote me," he said, "but 
I could gladly kiss you in Macy's 
window for that column on the oil 
business. It was wonderful!" 

Such exuberant, even irrational en- 
thusiasm for the piece in Commercial 
Commentary titled "Lamps for the 
Eyes of Oil Men" was by no means 
typical of the response we've had, 
however. 

Apparently my contention that oil 
is the worst advertised big industry 
in the U.S. stirred up a minor league 
storm of controversy and argument. 

From Tulsa. Oklahoma, for in- 
stance, came a letter from R. B. Mid- 
dleton, Jr. of D-X Sunray Oil Co. 
Mr. Middleton takes strong, exception 
to the statement that "oil and good 
advertising just don't mix." 

He says, "You are certainly not 
alone in your general impression of 
the current advertising in the oil in- 

34 



dustry. Most oil companies continue 
to be too busy countering each other's 
statements to ever come up with any- 
thing new and refreshing. 

"There are, however, some notable 
exceptions. Probably the most spec- 
tacular current example . . . our own 
company, D-X Sunray Oil Co. Cer- 
tainly we don't contend that our ad- 
vertising and sales promotion have 
been entirely responsible for the spec- 
tacular sales of D-X Boron Gasoline. 

"But we do contend that we and 
our advertising agency, Potts-Wood: 
bury, Inc. have done an excellent job 
of getting the impression of product 
superiority across to the public in a 
believable manner." 

Mr. Middleton goes on to quote 
some remarkable sales figures, and 
says, rebukingly, "These sales in- 
creases might even impress a soap 
company, and I imagine you might 
have crowed considerably about them 
in your days of writing gasoline ads." 

Balanced off against such a stal- 
wart defense, however, was a phone 
call I received from a veteran of 40 



years in the publishing business who 
professes to know the ad managers 
of nearly every major oil company 
in New York. 

"Congratulations," he said, "It's 
time somebody told those dumb 
cookies off. Keep up the good work.'* 

Al Dann at the ANA also sent con- 
gratulations, but took a more moder- 
ate tone. To him the column seemed' 
to highlight the "need for better un 
derstanding of advertising by top 
management," and he went on tc 
say, "This is an area where the Asi 
sociation of National Advertisers wil 
be devoting increasing attention 1 
Your excellent analysis will be o 
real help to us in such a program.' 

From Donald Deskey of the wel 
known industrial design firm, cam< 
this comment, "I was very much in 1 
terested to read your article 'Lamp: 
for the Eyes of Oil Men'. Althougl 
we are concerned with a different 
but certainly allied phase of the oi 
industry, we also have encountered 
the same basic problem discussed ii 
the article. "We can't feel as skeptical 
as you, however, for we know tha 
many of the industry's leaders such a 
Conoco (mentioned in your column 
recognize this situation and are be 
ginning to take the necessary steps t* 
overcome the problem." 

Meanwhile, a salesman for a leac 
ing New York radio station reporte 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195' 



ilo sponsor that "Lamps for the Eyes 

\\>{ Oil Men" was heing read (with 

Mome snickers and harumphs) by the 

|:ntire advertising department of Tide- 

|;vater Oil, and that all of his agency 

lilients who had oil accounts had read 

t and generally approved. 

During the Christmas holidays, at 

I 'arious parties, I ran into a number 

| »f agency men who swore me to 

secrecy, and wouldn't be quoted but 

U'vanted me to know that I had ex- 

I »ressed their sentiments pretty ac- 

urately. 

Apparently, however, such was not 

illhe reaction in Chicago. This past 

leek I received a three-page letter 

rom Kent H. Lee, v. p. of the D'Arcy 

Iigency. Mr. Lee enclosed five full- 

f page newspaper ads, three four-color 

jupplement proofs and a reel of tv 

. ommercials to support his rather 

ndignant disagreement with what I 

lad said. 

He begins, "I do not conclude, as 

ou have, that 'nearly all oil adver- 

I ising is composed of windy, mean- 

ngless claims, tired technical gob- 

iledegook, and a vast amount of 

umult and shouting over precisely 

iothing at all.' 

"It is my belief that the advertising 

irepared by D'Arcy for the Standard 

||)il Co. (Indiana) is accomplishing 

ts intended mission of influencing 

housands of motorists for the first 

ume, and holding millions of Stand- 

rd users to our products." 

Mr. Lee goes on to cite the tribute 

)aid to D'Arcy's advertising by 

young, aggressive John E. Swear- 

ngen 40-year old president of Stand- 

rd Oil (Indiana)" who credits it 

nth helping Standard to increase its 

hare of market. 

He also points to the high reader- 
hip figures attained by Standard's 
newspaper and supplement ads, and 
(escribes in detail the careful prepa- 
ation and screening by which D'Arcy 
»rovides a "Powerful, fool-proof, 
rouble-free, year-long program." 

Finally, Mr. Lee sums up, "We see 
ksolutely no comparison of your 
I'-scription of servicing a large pe- 
I'oleum account and our experience. 
I is true that Standard keeps D'Arcy 
»n its collective toes; but only so we 
an run faster with the ball, not after 
I. - ' 

How do other sponsor readers feel 
iibout this? ^ 



• ci «r la f ndkatarf by < h« 



TELEGRAM 



Nt.-N.ghf Um 



xlctfkm.li STANDARD TIME •■ polni o/otitfn Tb»« of wr«*t* I* STANDARD TIME ai pu4 n i *< Jn 



MB6rf. 



M GUA3?7 LONG ML PD=GREEM BAY WIS 6= 

:SP0NS0 R = 

4 EAST 49 MYK- 
*BECAUSE OF IMPORTANCE OF ICE CREAM USE OF PART 1-0 AY 
TOPPING, WE HAVE BEEN COLLECTING FIGURES ON SEASONAL 
ICE CREAM SALES, LATEST NATIONAL SURVEY SHOVIS THAT 
ICE CREAM PRODUCTION IS APPROXIMATELY ?1 PERCE IT 
LOWER IN TEST MONTHS OCTOBER THROUGH MARCH THAN IN 
SUMMER PERIOD. SPOT CHECK OF SUPER MARKETS |! ! THE AREA 

INDICATES THEY DO APPROXIMATELY # PERCENT •'ORE ICE 
CREAM VOLUME DURING MID SUMMER THAN MID W|NTER= 
- BO B P AR KER W B A Y -T V M AR KET I r !C MGR =• 



LESS TO TOP IN WINTER 



PONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



/F^s Parti-Day Toppings near the 
half-way mark in their 26-week test 
of day tv in the Green Bay, Wis. area, 
a serious question about the test struc- 
ture has been raised by SPONSOR and 
WBAY-TV executives. 

When the test started on 15 Octo- 
ber little was known about seasonal 
variations in the dessert topping busi- 
ness. Neither Parti-Day Corp. nor 
the D'Arcy agency had accurate in- 
formation on which to forecast sales 
potentials. It was generally assumed 
that Parti-Day would be used on many 
types of desserts, and as an ingredi- 
ent in cocoa and hot chocolate. 

The winter months were thought to 
be especially strong for the two lat- 
ter uses. But a recent survey (sponsor 
3 January) shows that the chocolate 
flavors are not running substantially 
ahead of butterscotch and marshmal- 
low, so apparently the cocoa-hot choc- 
olate market is smaller than expected. 



Furthermore there are indications 
that the ice-cream use of Parti-Day 
is leading all others by a wide mar- 
gin. Ice cream sales, however, as the 
above wire indicates, are generally 
25-30% lower in the winter months 
than they would be in summer. 

Does this invalidate the test results, 
or at least require that they be ad- 
justed upward by 25-30' < to indicate 
year-round potentials? Next week, 
sponsor publishes the answers to this 
and other questions in a full-length 
article on what Parti-Day has learned 
in the first 13 weeks of the test. ^ 



The test in a nutshell: Product: 
Parti-Day Toppings. Market: 80-mile 
area around Green Bay, Wis. Media: 
Day tv spots only. Schedule: It) 
spots weekh . Length : 26 weeks from 
15 Oct. Commercials: Li\e. one-min- 
ute. Budget : $9,980 complete. 



3 mil mi n mi i i nn i I u nun mi iiiiiinniiiiii i niinnnnniiii m mi mil inn in i mini line 



SALES BOX SCORE 

16-31 Oct 580 cases 

1-15 Nov 1,450 cases 

16-30 Nov 370 cases 

1-15 Dec 1,090 cases 

16-30 Dec 350 cases 







lO TH WEEK I 




1^ OF A 

7A-WFEK K^^lP 




TEST II 

iHSUdati ™ 




-SIM 




x*^ HjBMPii 




wWmBmwmaM 





Shipments to wholesalers in Green 
Bay, Wis. area since start of tv test 

i i nn iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii iiiiiiuiiiiiiimiinuil 

35 




Window card check: (1 to r) Champale v.p. B. Hertzberg, Doner & Peck a.e. D. Neuman, v.p. S. Hirschberg, creative dir. M. Reese 



A different image in every port 



^ That's what Champale malt liquor had to face; 
so it decided to make a virtue of its non-uniform appeal 

^ Radio has proved the only medium that can tailor 
the approach to each market cheaply, effectively, quickly 



■Sack in 1939 Metropolis Brewery, 
Inc. of New York launched a malt 
beverage which over the years ad- 
mittedly acquired more images among 
consumers than a kaleidoscope. Called 
Champale, it's a brewery-made prod- 
uct with the characteristics of cham- 
pagne. It's higher in alcohol than 
beer or ale and sells for a little more. 
Champale's past has been spotty. 
It did O.K. during the war, then went 
into a decline. In 1947, a re-pack- 
aging job was undertaken which 
changed the original brown bottle in- 
to a green one, decorated with a be- 
scrolled label suggesting elegance, 
conviviality and prestige. Sales perked 



up for a while, then slackened again. 

By this time it was pretty obvious 
to all concerned that if Champale was. 
to make its mark it couldn't rely on 
a single image. The way consumers 
thought about it differed widely by 
income groups, regions, local cus- 
toms and ethnic islands. Moreover, 
the variations among distributors 
themselves were so great that when 
Metropolis decided on a new adver- 
tising drive in 1954, it was working 
against a background that was a 
veritable Joseph's coat. 

"The job was to transmit the im- 
age of a stemmed glass in many dif- 
ferent settings," explains Metropolis 



v.p. Benjamin Hertzberg. "One per- 
son had to see it on a bar top, an- 
other on a silver serving tray, an- 
other on a gingham table cloth. In 
one market, all these images might 
be needed and more. In another, one 
would be required. A direct type of 
appeal control was needed." 

Having realized this, the problem 
was how to capitalize on multiple im- 
ages without getting into such a mix- 
ture of copy and media approaches 
that the product would get hopelessly 
lost. 

Another factor: local advertising! 
would be co-oped with distributors, 
so varying budgets had to be consid- 
ered. A series of radio buys seemed 
the answer, so spot radio was applied 
to the geographical and social patch- 
work. 

Legal factors mitigate for Cham 

pale in a number of states. "We 

looked at states where on-pr«mises 

consumption of alcoholic beverages 

(Please turn to page 78) 



36 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



■/ 



TV BASICS/JAN. -FEB 



Sponsors remain faithful to net tv 



^ Year-end tally shows that practically no clients 
desert tv though there are several programing changes 

^ In eight of the 10 show changes, advertisers kept 
same time period. Alcoa buys half -hour show on ABC TV 



^% mid -reason rundown of network 
Itv points up this fact: while there are 
Iseveral new shows on the screens, 
lold faces are footing the bills. 

Advertisers are sticking faithfully 
I to tv, with most of them hanging on 
■jto their original time slots, if not 

their original shows. 

This is the picture: Ten shows 

.were dropped so far this season; of 

these, eight sponsors retained their 

time period. 



Here's the sponsor-program run- 
down by network: 

CBS TV: Lever and Pharmaceu- 
ticals have replaced Jackie Gleason's 
half-hour with an hour-long western 
— Rawhide. Trackdown, following 
Gleason, moves with its sponsors to 
one of the half-hours vacated by Pur- 
suit. Mennen dropped the latter, and 
plans to go into two alternate week 
shows on NBC TV — Cimarron City 
and Dragnet. Adventures of Cham- 



pion takes up the first half-hour of 
the Pursuit slot, and, at press time, 
remains sustaining. 

NBC TV: Pharmaceuticals dropped 
Concentration, for It Could Be You; 
L&M did the same to Brains & 
Brawn, for The DAs Man. Further- 
more, L&M moved Steve Canyon to 
replace its cancelled Ed Wynn Show, 
and placed Black Saddle into Can- 
yon's slot. P&G replaced Tic Tac 
Dough with Buckskin, originally 
sponsored on alternate weeks by 
Pillsbury. 

ABC TV: Alcoa takes over Tues- 
day, 10-10:30 p.m.; R. J. Reynolds 
dropped Anybody Can Play leaving 
its replacement, Dr. I.Q. sustaining; 
Whitehall is out of John Daly News 
and Colt .45, Boyle-Midway and Ster- 
ling are in for the latter. ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN TELEVISION 



Network Sales Status Week Ending 17 January 

Daytime 



SPONSORED HOURS 



ABCf 
CBSf 
NBC 



123.1 
■27.9 



taw 

t Eicludlng participation showi. 



127 



ABCf 
CBSf 
NBC 



Nighttime 

IllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIII 
SPONSORED HOURS 

119.2 



124.1 



122 



!!'>;!!ll!!lll'£ 



^lllllllllllll!ll]l!ill!lll!l!ii!lll|]||||[|IJllllllU 



AVERAGE COST OF NETWORK SPONSORED PROGRAMING 



Cost 



Number 



Cost 



Number 



Cost 



Number 



Cost 



Number 



Half-hour comedy-var. 
$51,250 4 



Half-hour mystery 
$36,500 8 



Half-hour drama 
$40,333 6 

Half-hour adventure 
$30,188 8 



Situation comedy 
$39,643 14 

Quiz-Panel 
$27,250 9 



Hour music-variety 
$111,675 4 



Half-hour western 
$38,165 17 



/ 



ATerages are as of January. All programs are once weekly and all are nighttime shows. 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



37 



2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




PAH 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Small World 

O. Mathieson 

(D'Arcy) 

Sp-L $28.00(1 



Meet The Press 

SUSt 



Bing Crosby 

Coif 

Tournament 

Oldsmobile 

(Brother) 

(5:30-7; 1/18) 

I Sp-L $100,000 



Twentieth 
Century 

Prudential 
(H-McC) 



Chet Huntley 
Reporting 



No net service 



D Edwards 

Anier Home 

(Bates) 

N-L $9.500tt 



News 

SUSt 

N-L $6. J 



D Edwards 

B&H (DDB) 

DuPont (BBDO) 

N-L $9,oOUtt 



News 

sust alt 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 

N-L $6.500tt 



| You Asked for It 

Skippy Peanut 

Butter (GBB) 

M-F $21,000 



Lassie 



(BBDO) 
A-F $37,000 



Mark Saber 
Sterling (DFS) 
A-F $14.00( 

10 Little 

Indians 

Rexall (BBDO) 

(7-8; 1/18) 
lir.I Wlilll)! 



No net service 



No net service 



ABC News 



O Edwards 

Amer Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 

sust 
depeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Benson & Hedge; 
(repeat feed) 



News 

Bristol-Myers 

alt sust 
(repeat feed) 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
Kaiser Co (Y&R 
Draekett (Y&R) 
-F $70,000 



Bachelor Father 

Am Ton (Gumb.) 
Sc-F $42,000 

alt wks 
jack Benny 
Am Tob (BBDO 
C-F $05,000 



The Music Shop 

Starring 
Buddy Bregma 



Tales of The 
Texas Rangers 

(7:30-8:30) 

Sweets Co. 

(H. Eisen) 

W-F $11,000 



Name That 
Tune 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 

Q-L $23,000 



Buckskin 

P&G (B&B) 

W-F $24,00( 

Alphabet 

Conspiracy 

Amer Tel&Tel 

(Ayer) 

(7:30-8:30; 

1/26) 



Cheyenne 

(alt wks 

7:30-8:30) 

Harold Ritchie 

(A&C) 

Johnson & Johnson 

(Y&R) 
Armour (FC&B) 
Ai-LI ,$.78 11(111 



Stars in Action 



Dragnet 

sust 
Pillsbury (1/20 

only) 
My-F $35,00(1 



D-F 



$300,00 



Maverick 



Ed Sullivan 

(»-ai 

Mercury (K&E) 
alt Kodak (JWT) 
V-L $79,500 



"Steve Allen 

(8-0) 

Greyhound ( Grey 

DuPont (BBDO) 

Polaroid (DDB 

Norelco 

(LaRoche) 

v-L sio.s.ooi 



Shirley Temple's 
Storybook 

(7:30-8:30 every 

third week) 

J. H. Breck 

(Ayer) 

Dr-F $65,000 



The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 

W-F $37,000 



Restless Cun 

Sterling Drug 

(DFS) alt 

P&G (Compton) 

W-F $37.50( 



Sugarfoot 

(alt wks 

7:30-8:30) 

Am Chicle 

(Bates) 

T.uden's 

(Mathes) 

OLE $78 ono 



Invisible Man 



s Eddie Fisher 

L&M (Mc-E) 

(alt weeks; 8-9 

George Cobel 
RCA (K&E) 
Whirlpool (K&E 
V-L $98.00( 



Law Man 

R J Reynolds 

(Esty) 

General Mills 

(DFS) 

W-F $41.00( 



Ed Sullivan 



Steve Allen 

Zenith (FC&B) 

Mutual of Omahi 

(Bozell & 

Jacobs) 



Bold Journey 

Ralston-Purina 

(GBB) 

A-F $9,500 



Father Knows 
Best 

Lever (JWT) alt 

Scott (JWT) 
Sc-F $38.0«0 



Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

(SSC&B) 

alt Buick 

(Mc-E) 

W-F $43,80' 



Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills (DFS) 

alt P&G 

(Compton) 

W-F $38,000 



To Tell the 
Truth 

Carter (Bates) 

Marlboro 

(Burnett) 

Q-L $22,00( 



American 
Festival 

Amer Tel&Tel 

(Ayer) 

(8-9; 2/10) 

Mu-L $175,001 



Colt .45 

Sterling (DFS) 

Boyle-Midway 

(Geyer) 

Beech-Nut 

(Y&R) 

\V_£ S13.80J 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(BBDO) 

Dr-F $51,000 



*Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

V-L $150. 00( 



Voice of 
Firestone 

Firestone 

(Sweeney & 

James) 

Mu-L $32,000 



Danny Thomas 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

Sc-F $47,500 



Peter Cunn 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 

My-F $38,00( 



The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

P&G (B&B) 

Ralston 

(Gardner) 

W-F $36,000 



Arthur Godfrey 

Toni (North) 
Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
V-L $31.00( 



Ceorge Burns 
Show 

Colgate (Bates) 
Sc-F $40,00( 



Meet McCraw 

sust 

All Star 

Bowling 

Amer Machine 

Foundry (C&w; 

(9:30-10:30; 

1/18) 



Hitchcock 

Theatre 

Bristol-Myers 

(Y&R) 
My-F $39,000 



Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show 



Dr. I.Q. 

sust 



Ann Sothern 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

Sc-F $40,000 



Alcoa-Coodyeai 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSR) al 
Goodyear (Y&R 
Dr-F $39,00i 



Naked City 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) alt 

Quaker Oats 

(WBT) 

My-F $37,000 



*Red Skelton 

Pet Milk 

(Gardner) 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) 

C-F $52,00( 



Bob Cummings 

Reynolds (Esty 

Sc-F $36,001 

Bob Hope 

Buick (Mc-E) 

(9:30-10:30; 

2/10) 

ov h taeo,oo( 



Sp-L 



$3. Dill 



Your 
Neighbor — 
The World 

sust 



Keep Talking 

P. Lorillard 

(L&N) 

alt Lever (JWT) 

Q-L $18,000 



Loretta Young 

P&G (B&B) 
Dr-F $42,50( 



Patti Page 

Show 

Oldsmobile 

(Brother) 

V-L $10,000 



Desilu 

Playhouse 

(10-11) 

Wcstinghouse 

(Mc-E) 

Dr-F $82,000 

(average) 



Arthur Murray 

Party 

P. Lorillard 

(L&N) alt 

Pharmaceutical 

(Parkson) 

V-L $30,00( 



Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSR) 
Dr-F $35,000 



Carry Moore 

(10-11) 

Revlon 

(LaRoclie) 

V-L $59,000 

<V4 hr.) 



The 
Californians 

Singer (Y&R) 
Lipton (Y'&R) 
W-F $37,50 



No net service 



What's My Line 

Kellogg 

(Bumett) 

alt Fla. Citrus 

(B&B) 

Q-L $32,000 



No net service 



|ohn Daly News 
Lorillard (L&N) 
N-L $6,000 



No net service 



High Adventure 
Lowell Thomas 

Delco (C-E) 

(10-11; 1/19) 

A-F $250,000 



No net service 



|ohn Daly News 
Lorillard (L&N) 
N-L $6,000 



No net service 



Carry Moore 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Pittsburgh Plate 

(Maxon) 



No net service 



*Color show, ttCost is per segment. Prices do not include sustaining, par- 
ticipating or coop programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 
talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission). 



They do not include commercials or time charges. This chart covers period 
17 Jan. -13 Feb. Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure, 
(Au) Audience Participation, (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr) 



38 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



I G R A P 




17 JAN. 13 FEB 



DNESDAY 

BS NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



rards 

Bates) 

-oodi 

B) 



News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

N'-L $9.500tt 



News 

Bristol-Myers 

(DC8&S) 

alt sust 

-L $6.500tt 



D Edwards 
Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

Fla. Citrus 

N-L $9,500tt 



News 

sust 



No net service 



No net service 



No net service 



wards 

iter 
0< Foods 
nut feed) 



News 

sust 
(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 
Whitehall 



Tl.ght 
later 



Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 
Ford (var. hour) 

(JWT) 

National Biscuit 

(var. % hr.) 

(Mc-E) 

W-F $35,300 

(Vihr.) 



News 
Bristol-Myers 

alt sust 
(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 
Gen Foods 
Fla. Citrus 
(repeat feed) 



News 

(repeat feed) 



Leave It To 
Beaver 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

Ralston 

(Gardner) 

Sc-F $36,000 



I Love Lucy 

Pillsbury 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Clairol (FC&B) 

Sc-F $25,000 



efferson Drum 

Sweets Co. 

(Henry Eisen) 

alt sust 

rt'-F $18,500 



Rin Tin Tin 
Nabisco (K&E) 
A-F $36,00( 



Your Hit Parade 

Amer Tobacco 
(BBDO) 

Mu-L $42,500 



Northwest 
Passage 

sust 



Dick Clark 

Show 

Beech -Nut 

Life Savers 

(TAB) 

Mu-L $14,500 



Perry Mason 

<7:30-8:30) 

II Curtis 

(Gordon Best) 

I'arliament 

(B&B) 

My-F $25,700 

(20 min 



People Ate 
Funny " 

Tnni (North) alt 

It I Reynolds 

(Esty) 

&U-F $21,000 



Ann hires 
f .impion 



Wagon Train 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

(various V2 hrs) 

Elfin (JWT) 



Zorro 

AC Spark 

(Brother) 

7-TJp (JWT) 

A-F $37,000 



December 

Bride 

General Foods 

(B&B) 

Sc-F $32,000 



Steve Canyon 
L&M (Mc-E) 

alt sust 
,-F $44,000 



Walt Disney 

Presents 

(8-9) 

M-F $57,000 

<V4 hr.) 



Rawhide 

(8-9) 

Lever (JWT) 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 

W-F $90,000 

(1 hour! 



Further Advent, 
of Ellery Queen 
(8-9) RCA 
(K&E) 
(various Vi hrs) 
My-F $27,500 
(% hr.) 



Jubilee, U.S.A 

(8-9) 

Williamson- 

Dk'kie (Evans & 

Assoc.) 

Hill Bros. 

(Ayer) 

Mu-L $12,500 



Perry Mason 

Sterling mis 

Gulf (Y&R) 

Hamra (C-M) 

Colgate 



"1 (down 
pony 

At Tobac 
:i>0> 



Price Is Right 

Lever (JWT) 

Speidel (NC&K) 

Q-L $21,500 

Meet 

Mr. Lincoln 

Lincoln Nat'l 

Life Ins. 



The Real 

McCoys 

Sylvania (JWT) 

P&G (Compton) 

Sc-F $36,000 



Derringer 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) 

W-F $40,000 



It Could Be 
You 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
3-L $26,000 



Walt Disney 

Hill Bros. (Ayer) 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

Reynolds Metal 

(Buchan. & 

Frank) 



Rawhide 



Ellery Queen 

Bell & Howell 

Pillsbury (Bur) 

Phil Harris 

Timex (Peck) 

alt sust 

(8-9; 2/6) 

CV-L $250,000 



lubilce, U.S.A. 

Massev- Ferguson 

(NL&B) 



Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Brn. & Wmson 

(Bates) 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 

W-F $39.00C 



"Perry Como 

(8-9) 

Kimherley-Clark 

(FC&ltl 
RCA A Whirlpool 

KM 
V I. $120,000 



n i i ii u i i iii r u i ni ) 
Polaroid (DDB) 

Sunbeam 
(Perrtn-Paus) 

Noxzema 

(SSC&B) 
Am Dairy (C-M) 

Knomark) 

(Mogul) 



lonaire 
Bates) 
$37,000 



(Maxen) 

(8:30-9; 2/11) 

Dr-L $50,000 

Milton Berle 

Kraft (JWT) 

C-L $50,000 



Pat Boone 

Chevy 

Showroom 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

-L $45,000 



Zane Cray 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) alt 

General Foods 

(B&B) 

W-F $45,000 



Behind Closed 
Doors 

L&M (Mc-E) alt 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

A-F $38,000 



Man With A 

Camera 
General Elec. 

(BBDO) 

A-F $26.00( 



Phil Silvers 

Reynolds (Esty) 

Schick (B&B) 

Sc-F $42,000 

P. Silvers Show 

Pontlac 

(Mac, J&A) 

(9-10; 1/23) 

C-L $225,000 



M Squad 

Amer. Tobac 

(SSC&B) 

alt sust 

My-F $31,000 



Lawrence Welk 

Dodge (Grant) 

(9-10) 

Mu-L $17,500 



Cale Storm 

Nestle (Houston) 

alt 

Lever (JWT) 

Sc-F $39.50( 



Black Saddle 
L&M (Mi 1 

alt sust 
W V $37,00( 



'vCot a 
cret 

1 $27,000 
owf Month 
■ BBDO) 

-L $275,000 



Bat Masterson 

Kraft (.1WT) 

Sealtest (JWT) 

W-F $38,000 



Rough Riders 

P. Lorillard 

(L&N) 

W-F $47.000t 



Playhouse 90 

(9:30-11) 

Amer Gas 

(L&N) alt 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FC&B) 

Dr-L&F $45,000 

<tt hr.) 



Ford Show 

Ford (JWT) 

CV-L $38,000 



77 Sunset Str 

(9:30-10:30) 

Amer. Chicle 

(Bates) 

My-F $72.0O( 



Playhouse 

Lux (JWT) alt 

Schlitz (JWT) 

Hi F $38,000 



The Thin Man 

Colgate 

(Bates) 

My-F $40,060 



Lawrence Welk 



Have Cun. Wil 

Travel 
Whitehall 

(Bat. 
alt Lever (JWT] 
W-F $38,00< 



Cimarron City 

(9:30-10:30) 

sust 

W-F $30.00( 



-feel Hr 
s 10-11) 

" steel 

Ml 

I $60,000 



This Is Your 

Life 

P&G (B&B) 

D-L $32,000 



Make Mine 
Music 

sust 



Playhouse 90 
Allstate 
(Burnett) 



You Bet Your 

Life 

Tonl (North) 

Lever (JWT) 

Q-L $51.75 



77 Sunset Stri| 

Carter Prod. 

(Rates) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

Harold Ritchie 

(A&C) 



The Line Up 

P&G (Y&R) 

My-F $34,000 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 

Gillette (Maxon) 

(10-concl) 
Sp-L $45.00 



Sammy Kaye 
Show 
sust 



Cunsmoke 

L&M (DFS) 

Spetry-Rand 

(TAB) 

W-F $40.00i 



Cimarron City 



strong 
Theatre 

i 10-11) 
>nf Cork 

m 
$48,000 



Fred Astaire 
(repeat) 
Chrysler 
(Burnett) 

(10-11; 2/11) 
Mu-F $150,000 



John Daly News 
Lorillard (L&N) 
N-L $6,000 



Playhouse 90 

sust 



No net service 



Hall of Fame 

Hallmark 

(FC&B) 

(9:30-11; 2/5) 

Dr-L $330.00C 



|ohn Daly New ; 
Lorillard (L&N 

N-L $6,00 



No net service 



Person to 

Person 

P. Lorillard 

(L&N) 

alt Revlon 

(War&L) 

-L $38,000 



Fight Beat 

Brlstol-Myeri 

(DCSAS 

Sp-I $3.00( 



DA's Man 
LAM 

A I' 



Drama, (F) Film. (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Live. (M) Misc, 
1 Mu 1 Music, (My) Mystery. (N) News. (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Situation 
Oomedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (\V) Western. tNo charge for repeats. 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



I, preceding date means last date on air, S following date means starting 
date for new show or sponsor in time Blot. 



39 




*-" 



^1 



'■<■ ■■■■■■'■■■■■■■■■, , ,:. ...■:. 



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ow on the Milmukee 



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Storer Broadcasting is proud to become a part of.^^^ 
Milwaukee in operating television station WITI-rMa^L 
The same principles of integrity and responsible 
public service which prevail "'in all other Store 
stations will be the policy of WITI-TV. .. It is this 



**■% 




Broadcasting FAMOUS ON THE LOCAL SCENE, 
YET KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE NATION. 

The strength of Storer's experience in the sales 
uccess of its advertisers can now be applied in 
market of $1,270,000,000 annual retail 
sales and the nation's eighth most important 



torerBro 



WSPD-TV WA 

Toledo Atl 

: T 

WJW WSPD WAGA WWVA 

land Toledo Atlanta Wheeling PI 



MlSales Offices: 625 Madison Ave., I 
230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, 



York 2 

nklin 2-6498 



-3940 



Lti3"«i* 



DAYTIME 



C O 




P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



10:45 



Lamp Unto My 
Feet 



Look Up & Live 

sust 



Eye On 
New York 

sust 



For Love or 
Money 

sust 



Arthur Godfrey 
Standard Brands 



I Love Lucy 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Ponds 
alt Lever 



P&G alt 

Mpnthnlfltnm 



Price Is Right 

Lever 
alt Ponds 



Sterling 
alt Whitehall 



For Love or 
Money 

sust 



Arthur Godfrey 

Hver lit 
Gen Mills 



Libby alt sust 



I Love Lucy 

Lever alt sust 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Culver alt sust 



Frigldalre alt 
Pharmaceut. 



Price Is Right 

Lever alt 

Sunshine 

Stand Brands 



Johns Hopkins 
File 7 

sust 



Camera Three 

sust 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Shulton 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 



Concentration 
Pharm. alt Lever 



Armour 
alt Culver 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Amana Refrlg. 



Top Dollar 
Colgate 



Concentration 

Ftigidaire alt 
Pharm a. 
Lever alt 

4 1hi»rM Pl.lv.r 



Pete 

H 

Reynol 



12:15 
12:30 
12:45 



Bishop Pike 

sust 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Gen Foods 
Sunshine 
alt Lever 



Love of Life 

sust 

Amer Home Prod 

alt Block Drug 



Tic Tac Dough 

Ponds alt 
Goldseal 



Peter Lind 

Hayes 

Armour & Co. 

Gen Foods 



Love of Life 

Quaker alt Libby 

Amer Home 



Tic Tac Dough 

Stand Brands 
P&G 



Pete 

H 
Dr 



Search tor 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



[ College News 
Conference 

sust 



Play Your 
Hunch 

Minn. Mining 

Johnson & 

Johnson 



Guiding Light 
P&G 



Could Be You 

Whitehall alt 

Menthol 

Ponds alt P&G 



Play Your 
Hunch 

Beech-Nut 
Lever 



Search For 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Guiding Light 
P&G 



It Could Be 
You 

Al. Culver alt 
Pharmaceuticals 



Plat 



Aimouf 8U f&Q 



Liberace 

Armour & Co. 

Gen Foods 



No net service 



News 
(1:25-1:30) 

sust 



No net service 



Liberace 

Gen Foods 
Minn. Mining 



No net service 



News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 



No net service 



Frontiers 
of Faith 

sust 



World Turns 
P&G 

Sterling alt 
Carnation 



No net service 



World Turns 
P&G 

Sterling alt 
Miles 



No net service 



Mr. Wizard 

sust 



Day In Court 

Gen Foods 
Amer Home 



)immy Dean 

S.C. Johnson 
alt sust 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Day In Court 

Gen Foods 
Bris-Myers 



Jimmy Dean 

Libby alt sust 
Miles 
Swift 



Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Day 
G< 



NBA— Pro 
Basketball 

Bayuk Cigars 
(Vt sponsorship) 



Music Bingo 

Gen Mills 
Minn. Mining 



Art Linkletter 

Stand Brands 
alt Lever 



Haggis Baggis 

sust 



Art 



Standard Brand 
Van Camp 



Menthol alt sust 



Music Bingo 

Beech-Nut 



Linkletter 

Swift 
alt Ton! 



Haggis Baggis 

sust 



Mus 



Kellogg 



| Open Hearing 

sust 



The Last Word 

sust 



Beat The Clock 

Gen Foods 

Lever 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Beat The Clock 

Beech-Nut 
Nestle 



Big Payoff 

sust 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

P&G alt Nablsci 



Beat 



Roller Derby 

sust 



The World 
of Ideas 

sust 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Bristol-Myers 
Gillette 



Verdict Is Yours 

Stand Brands 

Bristol-Myers 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Johnson & 

Johnson 

Minn. Mining 



Verdict Is Your! 

Gen Mills 

alt Carnation 

Swift 

alt Toni 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 



Who 

Cam i 



Roller Derby 



Face The 
Nation 

sust 



American 
Bandstand 

Lever 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

Amer Home Proc 



Queen Day 
Ponds 

alt Sterling 



American 
Bandstand 

Welsh, Lever, 
Vick 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

Gen Mills 
alt Quaker 



Queen for a 

Day 

Standard Brand 

P&G 



i ic 



Bowling Stars 

imer Machine 



Raul Winchell 

Hart?. 
Gen Mills 



I Lone Ranger 

Gen Mills 

| Cracker Jack 

Fritos Co. 



Behind The 
News 

sust 



American 

Bandstand 

Hollywood Candj 

Eastco 



Edge of Night 
P&G 

Pharmaceuticals 



County Fair 

sust 
Sterling 
alt Lever 



Game of 
Politics 

sust 
N.Y. Philhar.* 
Lincoln (K&E) 



(4:30-5:30; 1/25) 
Amateur Hour 
Pharmaceuticals 



Omnibus 

(5-6 alt wks) 

Aluminium Ltd 



American 

Bandstadn 

co-op 



NBC 
Kaleidoscope 

(5-6 alt wks) 
sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 

Sweets Co. 
Bristol-Myers 



American 

Bandstand 

Block Drug 

Gillette 



Edge ef Night 

P&G 

Sterling 

alt Miles 



County Fair 

Dow alt lust 

sust alt 

Lever 



American 

Bandstand 

co-op 



Walt Disney's 

Adventure Timi 

P&G 



•fTalent cost: New York Philharmonic, $150,000 

HOW TO USE SPONSORS 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH & INDEX 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (38. 'I 
includes regularly scheduled programing 17 Jan. to 
13 Feb., inclusive (with possible exception of chaie- 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly scld 
uled programs to appear during this period are lied 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled o- 



42 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 19' 



G R A P 




17 JAN. - 13 FEB 



ONESDAY 
C> NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

ABC , CBS , NBC 



SATURDAY 

fi£ £B5 NBC 



Dough Re Mi 

BUSt 



For Love or 
Money 



Dough Re Mi 



Metithnlatum 



For Love or 
Money 



Dough Re Mi 

Bust 

Armour 



Captain 

Kangaroo 

Partic 



Dowdy Doody 
nontai 
Baking 
Sweat Co. 



Treasure Hunt 

Heinz alt Brlllo 

Corn Prod 

alt P&G 



Arthur Codfrey 



Standard Brand 



Treasure Hunt 
Pillsbury alt 

Frigidaire 

P&G 



Arthur Codfrey 
U.S. Steel 

alt sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Gen Mllli 

alt Ponds 

Whitehall ill 

Sterling 



Mighty Mouse 

Gen B"ooda tit 

Colgate 



Ruff & Reddy 
Gen Foods 
alt Mars 



Price Is Right 

Frigidaire 

Sterling 

Sandura alt 

Pillihiiry 



I Love Lucy 
Lever alt sust 



Price Is Right 

Al. Culver 

alt Lever Bros 

Miles alt 

Menlhnl 



I Love Lucy 
Lever alt sust 
Colgate all Mist 



Price Is Right 
Lever alt 
Corn Prod 



Stand Brands 
r.m Mills 



Uncle Al Show 
(11-121 

National Hiscui 



Heckle & )eckl< 

su m alt sust 



Fury 
Borden 

alt Gen Mills 



Concentration 

Heinz alt Miles 

Nabisco alt 

Armour 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Nestle 
Armour 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 



Concentration 

Pillsbury alt 
Lever 
Heinz alt 
Whitehall 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Minn. Mining 
Gillette 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 



Concentration 

Ponds alt 
Bauer & Black 



Uncle Al Shov 



Adventures of 
Robin Hood 

sust 



Lever alt sust 



Colgate alt sust 



Circus Boy 

M.irs alt 

sust 



Tic Tac Dough 

Heinz 
alt Pillsbury 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Araer Home 
Gen Foods 



Love of Life 

Scott alt sust 



Tic Tac Dough 

Al. Culver 

alt Heinz 

P&G 



Peter Lind 
Hayes 

Gen Mills 
Beech- Nut 



Love of Life 

Atlantis 
alt sust 



Lever alt 
Gen Mills 



Tic Tac Dougl 

Gen Mills alt 

Sunshine 



P&G 



True Story 

sust 
Sterling Drug 



Could Be You 

Whitehall alt 
Pharmaceuticals 



Search tor 

Tomorrow 

P&G 

Guiding Light 

P&G 



If Could Be 

You 

Miles alt 

Pillsbury 

P&G 



Search tor 

Tomorrow 

P&G 

Guiding Light 

P&G 



Could Be Y8U 

Stand Brands 
alt Ponds 
P&G alt 
Corn Prod 



Corn Prod 
alt Brillo 



Play Your 
Hunch 
Armour 

Reynolds Metals 



Play Your 

Hunch 

Bristol-Mjers 



Young People's 
Concert 

sust 
(12-1; 1/24) 



Detective Diari 
Sterling Drug 



No net service 



Liberace 

Reynolds Metals 
Gen Foods 



No net servio 

News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 



No net service 



Liberace 

Beech -Nut 



No net service 



News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 



No net service 



No net service 



No net service 



As the World 
Turns 
P&G 



No net service 



World Turns 
P&G 



Pillsbury 



Swift 
alt Sterling 



No net service 



Pro Hockey 

co-sponsorship 
(2 to concl.) 



No net service 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Day In Court 

Minn. Mining 

Johnson & 

Johnson 



Jimmy Dean 
Lever alt 
Van Camp 

Brn & Wmsn 
alt Lever 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Culver alt sust 



Day In Court 

Gen Foods 



limmy Dean 

Kodak alt sust 

Gerber 
alt Gen Mills 



Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



No net service 



Haggis Baggis 

sust 



Music Bingo 
Johnson & 

Johnson 
Amer Home 



Art Linkletter 
Kellogg 
Pillsbury 



Haggis Baggis 

sust 



Music Bingo 

Gen Foods 

Armour 



Art Linkletter 
Lever Bros 



Swift alt 

Stall -y 



Haggis Baggis 

Lever alt sust 



Wheaties Sport 

Page 

Gen Mills 



Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&G 



Beat The Cloc 
Gen Foods 



Big Payoff 

sust 



Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&G alt Armou 



Beat The Clod 

Gen Foods 
Lever 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 



Young 

Dr. Malone 

P&G 



From These 

Roots 
P&G alt sust 
Frigid alt sust 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Amana Refrig. 



Verdict Is You 

Sterling alt Scot 

Libby 

alt Scott 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 

sust 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

Gen Foods 
Beech-Nut 



Verdict Is Your 

Gen Mills alt 

Atlantis 



Gen Mills 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 

alt sust 
sust 



» rrvn mrn 
Queen for a 
Day 

Corn Prod alt 

Pillsbury 

P*G 



American 

Bandstand 

5th Ave Candy 

Welch 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

Scott alt 

Amur Ilimin 



Queen for a 

Day 

Al. Culver 

alt Miles 
P&G 



American 
Bandstand 



Brighter Day 

P&G 
Secret Storm 
Amer Home Pro 1 
alt Gen Mi 



Queen Day 

Whitehall alt 

sust 

P&G 



County Fair 

Frigidaire 
alt sust 



Heinz alt 
Sterling 



American 
Bandstand 

Gillette 



Edge of Night 

[•&G 

Pillsbury 



County Fair 
Heinz alt 

sust 



Nabisco alt Leve 



American 
Bandstand 

Eastco 
Gen Mills 



Edge of Night 
P&G 

Amer Home 

alt 

Sterling 



County Fair 

Gen Mills alt 
sust 



Lever alt sust 



American 

Bandstand 

co-op 



American 

Bandstand 

co-op 



All-Star Golf 

Miller Brew 
Reynolds Mcta 



Walt Disney's 

Adventure Tim i 

Miles 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Sen Mills 

Sweets, P&G 



All-Star Golf 



Lone Ranger 

Nestle alt 
Gen Mills 



5 not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l:00 
Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday 
Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m. (Carter and 
fell); Today, NBC. 7:00-9:00 a.m., Monday-Friday, 
:ipating; News CBS, 7:45-8:00 a.m. and 8:45-9:00 
Monday-Friday. All times are Eastern Standard. 



Sponsors, co-sponsors and alternate-week sponsors are 
shown along with names of programs. Alphabetical index 
of nighttime programs has been discontinued. Show costs 
descriptions and agencies I in parenthesis) are included in 
the charts on pages 38 and 39. 



'ONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



43 



As ANPA steps up its attack on tv, SPONSOR ASKS: 



How do you sell against news 




With ANPA intensifying its ef- 
forts to minimize efficiency of air 
media, six station men tell how 
they are taking up the offensive. 

George Moore, sales manager, JVRGP- 
TV, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The air media have never particu- 
larly sold against newspapers, mainly 
because we didn't have to, and most 



Tv is more 
cost efficient 
on a per 
exposure basis 



of us rightly felt that negative selling 
was not the best policy. But the time 
has come to fight back, and fight back 
hard. 

Television, which incorporates 
sight and sound, which utilizes mo- 
tion and demonstration, and which 
gains entry for its persuasive air 
salesmen into the homes of millions 
of prospective customers, is unques- 
tionably the best medium for sales. 

It is gratifyingly paradoxical that 
tv, which uniquely combines all of 
the ideal salesmanship factors, is 
many times more cost-efficient than 
print media on a per exposure basis. 
According to the Leo Burnett survey, 
tv is four times more cost-efficient 
than newspapers but, unfortunately, 
we have yet no way of knowing how 
many more times tv is more efficient 
than print on a per-sale motivation 
basis! 

These figures point up the fallacy 
- — and a highly prevalent one — of tak- 
ing newspaper circulation figures as 
a guide to the reach of any particu- 
lar ad. 

Furthermore, it is important to 
point out, when mentioning percent- 
ages noted, that these figures are 
based solely on the actual readers of 
a newspaper, and newspaper circula- 



tion, unlike tv, nowhere near saturates 
a market. 

For example, in medium-sized 
standard metropolitan areas (ap- 
proximately 100,000-105,000 fami- 
lies) the tv penetration figure gen- 
erally hovers in the high 80's and 
90's. On a weekly basis, a good tv 
station's circulation is virtually 100% 
of this. 

Furthermore, ratings which are 
tv's hard measure of commercial im- 
pact are predicated on all tv homes, 
representing in the neighborhood of 
90% of the market, while newspaper 
readership figures are predicated on 
the number of subscribers, which rep- 
resents, in our limited sample, 64% 
of the families in a market! 

Arden Swisher, general sales manager, 
KMTV, Omaha 

Our approach to the advertiser 
who will decide between television 
and newspaper is based on the vital- 
ity and selling power of sight, sound 



Tv advertisers 
know whom 
they're reach- 
ing and when 



and motion as opposed to a still and 
speechless newspaper ad. Secondly, 
we prove that the advertisers know 
who they're reaching and when with 
television as opposed to the false as- 
sumption that everyone reads the 
newspaper page. 

We prove television's power through 
specific success stories. We contrast 
newspaper ads with sample commer- 
cials tailored to the potential adver- 
tiser. We have often gone after, with 
success, the exclusive newspaper ad- 
vertiser. Using our art and produc- 
tion facilities, we clip his newspaper 
ad and bring it to life. This approach 
is particularly effective with men's 




clothing and theater accounts. 

We point out that the advertiser is 
not buying a pig in a poke when he 
buys television. We explain ratings 
and how these ratings indicate the 
potential ready audience that awaits 
good, well-planned commercials. 

We contrast this with newspaper's 
failure to provide readership ratings. 
And every advertiser will agree, al- 
though it needs to be pointed out 
again and again, that a newspaper 
circulation of 100,000 does not mean 
100,000 readers of an ad. 

We found that if we sell the idea 
of television first, we will automati- 
cally sell time with the idea. 

It's always easier to sell a produc 
when you have a logical, comple 
story to tell ... a story backed 
thousands of convinced advertiser 
We do it without tearsheets. 

Carl J. Burkland, exec. v.p. & gen., 
mgr., WAVY -TV, Norfolk, Va. 

We use three factors in selling 
against newspapers. 

The first factor — the ability to 
demonstrate through sight, sound and 



Tv demon- 
strates product 
thru sight, 
sound, action 



action — speaks for itself. The sec- 
ond factor will vary by areas but. 
generally speaking, television can pro- 
vide far greater coverage. In oui 
area, the leading daily newspaper has 
a total circulation of 109,000 whereas 
a conservative coverage study has re 
ported our total circulation after fiv< 
months of telecasting at 303,000, a: 
advantage factor of almost three tc 
one. 

The third factor deals with cost o' 
reaching consumers by television anc 
newspapers. In our case a local read 




44 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195S 



papers 



Sfship surve) lias been made. It re- 
zeals a tremendous difference in total 
eadersliip In pages, and astounding 
lifferences in readership by editorial 
ten is. pictures and advertisements. 

Nor do all subscribers to a news- 
japer read the front page. Four per 
•ent of the subscribers interviewed 
lad not read anything on the front 
)age. and only one story on the front 
>age was read by more than 50% of 
he subscribers. 

Specific readership of advertise- 
nents will vary even more. The cap- 
ion on a full-page color advertise- 
nent was read by less than half of 
he subscribers to a newspaper, and 
■opv in that advertisement was read 
;>y less than one-third of the sub- 
cribers. Thus, the three factors 
vhich we use in selling against news- 
>apers are: first, television superi- 
nitv. because it employs sight, sound 
ind action as opposed to newspapers' 
ight only; second, the substantial 
•overage advantage usually provided 
>v television, and third, the greater 
mdience and lower cost-per-1,000 
hat can be delivered by tv. 

'aul O'Brien, general sales manager, 
WNTA-TV, New York 

It's difficult to say that one medi- 
um is more effective than another be- 
ause each one has its own unique 



I 



,-"* • 



• -. 






Tv provides 
far better 
coverage at 
lower cost- 
per-1,000 



dvantages. But for the advertiser 
anting to reach as many people as 
ossible. television is definitely su- 
erior to the newspaper. 
Let s take an individual station, 
hannel 13, WNTA-TV, and stack it 
p against a standard-size New York 
(Please turn to page 80) 



LATEST AR B 

FOUR WEEK, Oct. 15-Nov.ll SURVEY 

Shows WDEF-TV 

CHATTANOOGA 



fir** 




ft 



total competitive quarter hrs. 

WDEF-TV 226 

Station B 191 

Station C 61 

t! IP ^ffP rime viewing hrs. 7- 11:15pm 

//'' WDEF-TV 71 

Station B 17 

Station C 2 2 

in facilities too! 



fifW « 

telecasting from 



new broadcast center 




The BRANHAM Company 

74th MARKET-CHATTANOOGA 




3 0NS0R • 17 JANUARY 1959 



45 



in mt tMii 
IN THE EAST 
IN THE EAST 
IN THE EAST 
IN THE EAST 

EASTMAN 
EASTMAN 
EASTMAN 
EASTMAN 




MUVIELAB H H H H 

MOVIELAB OOOO 

movielab 3333 

MOVIELAB 0000 






BLACK & WHITE 



INTERNEGATIVE B B B B B 

INTERPOSITIVE g g 5 5 S 

INTERNEGATIVE 5 5 5 S 3 

INTERPOSITIVE hw*2«m*n2» 

INTERNEGATIVE g g Q ,g Q , 

INTERPOSITIVE p p p p p 

INTERNEGATIVE 



Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 
Kodachro 



color 
color 
color 
color 

Kn c/i c/* c/i 



*-■ *-■ J-i 






hhhpH 




Write for Color Methods Brochure: MOVIELAB COLOR CORPORATION, Movielab 

JUdson 6-0360 



,619 West 54th St., New York 19, N.Y., 




TV COMMERCIALS 



a 16-page section on 

what's ahead in film and tape, 

the new creative (rends. 

tin- budget outlook* 

lat<> nvws 

from producers, pins 

A DIRECTORY OF 

OO COMMERCIALS PRODUCERS 

IN NEW YORK, LOS ANGELES 

& CHICAGO 



I 





Film-plus-tape installation is used at Filmways (above) by Colgate via Ted Bates to rehearse, check on tape what's being shot on tv film 



THE COMMERCIAL IS 'IT' IN '59 



^ Tv will see all-out commercials fight of new tape 
vs film, bringing many mechanical innovations 

^ Ad spending on tv commercials— lagging relative to 
print— will be boosted drastically; accent is on creativity 



\j ommercials are about to take a 
giant step on to a new plateau. As an 
essential part of the over-all tv indus- 
try, commercials often have been 
either brushed off or singled out for 
special criticism. But a new phase 
seems to be in store for tv commer- 
cials in 1959 — one that brings with it 
increased status and a more impor- 



tant role than ever in agency plan- 
ning and thinking. You can spot this 
in the following: 

Budgets for commercials are in 
for some drastic revisions. While the 
costs of producing commercials have 
increased a little — film costs will go 
up slightly and tape will represent 
the possibility of some economies — 



the real difference anticipated in com- 
mercials spending is in the percentage 
of a client's over-all balance sheet to 
be allocated for commercials produc- 
tion. 

Tv commercials budgets have 
lagged behind print on a percentage 
basis. A rule of thumb in print ad- 
vertising is that somewhere between 
10% and 15% of campaign costs will 
be allotted for production expense. 
But in tv, this percentage has slacked 
off. During 1958, over $1.3 billion 
was spent in U. S. tv, but less than 
$50 million was estimated to have 
been spent on filming commercials. 
While this does not include spending 
on network live commercials or local 



48 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



commercials, still a big difference is 
;lear: print budgets have been allot- 
:ing two to three times more to pro- 
bation costs than tv budgets. 

There will be a sharp rise in spend- 
ing on commercials in 1959. One 
'stiinate puts anticipated spending 
an filming and taping tv commer- 
cials this year at about 50% higher 
han in 1957. 

A revolution in techniques and 
realivity is brewing with the intro- 
luction of videotape plus a major 
■ounter-attack from new film meth- 
)ds. Sweeping changes are on the 
lorizon in the planning, writing, and 
iroduction of both film and tape com- 
nercials. The new paths ahead in 
Mininercials production will demand 
\ ide experimentation — which must 
ead to both large rewards for some 
ind disappointments for others. 

Film commercials spending will 
rise by several millions in 1959. 
\\ hile unit costs in tv commercials 
iroduction will go up a little, the ma- 
or increase in film spending will 
dine about through the steady in- 
crease of quality in commercials. 
i he\ "11 cost more principally because 
hex II try to accomplish more. 

Tape commercials spending will 
>e relatively small this year, but will 
ncrease in 1960. One educated guess 
ilaces tape commercials billings in 
959 at "a couple of million." A kev 
actor is that tape-equipped stations 
lo not yet cover half the nation's tv 
tomes. But a year from now, a 
lealthy majority of homes are ex- 
acted to be within range of video- 
ape stations. 

The eventual niche of the tape 
ommercial is still uncertain. While 
ipe offers the potent advantages of 
peed and economy compared to film, 

still will take widespread experi- 
lentation to fix an ultimate role for 
.. Tape partisans feel that it's the 
ommercial of the future. Many film 
ten take the viewpoint that it's only 

ua\ of pre-recording live commer- 
ials. 

What is tape? 

Since confusion hangs over some 

id circles on the subject of tape, a re- 

icw of tape's accomplishments and 

lortcomings will aid clarification. 

ideotape simply stated is this: a way 
f recording and playing back im- 
lediately at a high level of quality 
hatever can be done in the "live" 

studio. 



The only thing revolutionarj about 
tape is that it combines in a new way 
capabilities that were available only 
separately hitherto. Kinescope could 
record and pla\ back — but processing 
took time and quality was always a 
matter of debate. 

Among the many advantages that 
have been experienced since the intro- 
duction of videotape, these stand out 
as being of prime importance: 

• Pre-recording of commercials 
that were formerly done "live, ' with 
all the spontaneity of live-looking tv, 
but without the hazards or mishaps 
that can occur in live presentations. 

• As a rehearsal tool for commer- 
cials that eventuallv will be done on 



film sometimes with side-by-side 
shooting of film and tape cameras. A 
few minutes after production is over, 
client, agency, producer, and per- 
formers can preview in the tape play- 
back exactlv what will come back 
from the film laboratories a few days 
later. 

• Economy and speed: videotape 
production costs are said to run one- 
third below film costs on the average; 
and since "processing" is instan- 
taneous, there's no delay and no need 
to rely on outside facilities. 

Nonetheless commercials produc- 
tion using tape still has to overcome a 
number of problems. Some will take 
time, others will require research, 




Infra-red process, among the startling new film developments of recent weeks, now can 
do automatic traveling mattes to combine live-action foregrounds and backgrounds. Glade 
commercial produced for Benton & Bowles shows original studio shooting (above I and final 
composite delivered (below) by MPO. which has exclusive on process for the East Coast 



•ONSllli 



17 JANUARY 1959 




still others may have to be bypassed 
entirely. Some of these difficulties 
are: 

• Station coverage still is pretty 
meager. At present, only 40% of 
U. S. tv homes may be reached by 
tape-equipped stations. By January, 
1960, this will increase to an esti- 
mated 70%. A hidden factor in these 
coverage figures is that station choice 
is limited until all the outlets in a 
videotape market install facilities. 

• Handling of prints still offers 
some troubles. Copying in quanti- 
ties, ready identification of prints, 



can be achieved only when a number 
of pieces of equipment are grouped 
for mass production. Actually, rock- 
bottom costs aren't possible until sev- 
eral millions have been put into a 
round-the-clock operation. I Natural- 
ly, these figures don't apply to sta- 
tions and others with going studio fa- 
cilities.) 

But. in all. here's the point to re- 
member: 

The implications of tape on the 
commercials production field are 
greater than anything else that's hap- 
pened since the introduction of tv it- 



rangement made between a commer- 
cials producer and a local station, 
with the latter providing existing stu- 
dio space and facilities. 

Because of the high investment, 
producers must either jump in — or 
wait and see. And if tape proves a 
commercial success, the producers 
who took the wait and see attitude 
will find themselves a year or more 
advantage. Meanwhile, admen will 
be keeping a sharp watch on tape 
pioneers, learning from their success 
and troubles. 




"Squeeze" motion commercial for Aero Shave is planned at 
JWT by producer Lew Schwartz (center) with co-art directors Jack 
Wohl (standing) and Art Koch. Follow next step; shown at right 



Still photographs — '500 of them — are shot by photographer Howard 
Zieff using models Stan Sherwin and Pamela Curran; selected shots 
got "action" and sound on Transfilm animation stand. See top p. 51 



trafficking copies to stations, etc., still 
must be smoothed out. 

• High cost of installation of 
videotape equipment must be re- 
couped by diversified activities. With 
a single piece of apparatus (such as 
the Ampex VTR-1000 costing $45,- 
000 1 continuous use is necessary if 
the investment is to be written off. 
Moreover, real long-range efficiency 



50 



self. Because of the tremendous in- 
itial costs, smaller producers who 
don't have the big investment capital 
will experience a certain amount of 
headaches. One way of getting 
around this formidable obstacle, yet 
to be tested, is the idea of a "com- 
munity pool" financed jointly by a 
number of producers in major cities. 
Still another solution is a mutual ar- 



Who's Using Tape? 

In addition to the commercials be- 
ing taped by the networks for their 
clients, a few videotape producers de- 
livered commercials last fall. A sam- 
pling of who is active with tape may 
be seen in this listing of December 
1958 production by Telestudios in 
New York : 

SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



Advertiser: 

Kellogg 
Gillette 
Sealtest 
Johnson & 
Johnson 
Noxzema 
Newport 
Super Suds 
Savarin 
Prudential Ins. 
Breck 



Agency: 
Leo Burnett 
Maxon 
N. W. Ayer 



N. W. Aver 

DCSXS 

L&N 

<:\\\ 

FC&B 

Reach, McClinton 

Reach, McClinton 

A recent survey of the intentions of 
■ limis and agencies representing 
id' i of current tv spending — a pretty 
sizable sample — shows tremendous 
variations of attitude toward tape, 
ganging from cautious experimenta- 
tion to enthusiastic hacking. Whether 
or not there are widespread switches 
to tape by "live*' and film devotees 
remains to be seen, but almost every- 
one appears to want intensely to get 
some experience in the tape field. 

Film's changing status 

Certainly the introduction of tape 
is acting as a spur to new develop- 
ments in film techniques and creativ- 
ity. Under the spur of competition, 
film men such as Marvin Rothenberg 
of MPO Productions foresee a flower- 
ing of strictly visual and cinematic 
creativity in film once it is freed from 
the aural and talking tradition that tv 
inherited from radio. 

The harmonious co-existence of 
film and tape is already being dem- 
onstrated by some film producers. 
Martin Ransohoff of Filmways an- 
ticipates the valuable use of tape as a 
rehearsal device for film commercials 
production. (See photo, page 48.) 

Many film producers have equipped 
themselves for videotape and have 
run experiments with it. William 
linger of Elliot, Unger & Elliot ac- 
quired the former Vidicam facilities 
in New York as a tape studio for 
EUE, and trials with tape have been 
in progress for a number of months. 

New technical developments in film 
production such as the infra-red 
process have received widespread 
agenc) and client approval. The new 
mlra-red process, perfected by the 
late Bernard Leonard Pickley, has 
been franchised on an exclusive basis 
to MPO in the East and Cascade in 
■the West. It involves an automatic 
traveling matte which eliminates ex- 
pensive and tedious hand operations in 
combining separate foregrounds and 




Freeze-effecl in commercials begins with sound-voice track; animation of stills is 
added later. Typical of vogue towards surprising visuals and brief, hard-hitting 
copy is scene (above) from Transfilm's network Aero-Shave commercial just made 




Arresting results in these '"squeeze" motion commercials for Ford (above) and Tek 
(below) have started one major bandwagon for Transfilm and other film producers 
that's expected to mushroom into one big creative trend in tv commercials of 1959 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 








BOX 

TROY NEW YORK 




J\PO 



Television Films 
Inc. 



Currently Producing 
Television Commercials 
For: 

N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc. 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 

Benton & Bowles, Inc. 

D. P. Brother 

Leo Burnett & Co., Inc. 
Campbell-Mithun, Inc. 
Compton Advertising, Inc. 
D'Arcy Advertising Co., Inc. 
Dancer — Fitzgerald — Sample 
Donahue & Coe, Inc. 
Doyle • Dane • Bernbach, Inc. 
William Esty & Co. 
Clinton E. Frank, Inc. 
Foote, Cone & Belding, Inc. 
Grey Advertising Agency, Inc. 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 
Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Inc. 
Lennen & Newell, Inc. 
Richard K. Manoff, Inc. 
Maxon, Inc. 
McCann, Erickson, Inc. 
McKim Advertising Ltd. 
Emil Mogul Co. 
Morse International 

E. W. Reynolds & Co. 
Reach, McClinton & Co. 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc. 

Tatham-Laird, Inc. 

J. Walter Thompson Co. 

Edw. H. Weiss Co. 

Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

Offices — 

New York City 

15 EAST 53rd STREET 

MUrrayhill 8-7830 

Hollywood 

4110 RADFORD AVENUE 
POplar 6-9579 



Irani 
UraKOOUCEIS 
UfS| Ssocmnoii I 

OF NEW YORK 



backgrounds. (See photo, page 49.) 
(The infra-red process basically is 
this: The foreground is lighted nor- 
mally, and the background to be 
matted out is lighted heavily with 
special infra-red light. Shooting is 
done via two of the three film sys- 
tems of a Technicolor camera, one 
loaded with conventional film and the 
other with infra-red sensitive film. 
The set of images produced on this 
latter film is a perfect and complete 
set of mattes. ) 

Here is a list of some of the adver- 
tisers and agencies who have pro- 
duced commercials at MPO in the 
last few weeks using the infra-red 
process : 

Advertiser: Agency: 

Remington Compton 

Rand 

Ponds' JWT 

Ivorv Flakes Compton 

Campbell Soup BBDO 

Mott's apple SSC&B 
juice 

Chase & Compton 

Sanborn 

Bulova Mc-E 

Glade B&B 

Revlon Satin Emil Mogul 
Set 

A significant fact in the listing 
above is that while cosmetics and lux- 
ury goods advertisers are heavy users 
of the new film process, it is catching 
on in other categories, too. The 
infra-red process, which opens an en- 
tirely new world of imagination in 
film production, is one more of the 
factors in the fresh creativity of com- 
mercials coming in 1959. 

Some of the film companies are in- 
vesting heavily and with confidence 
in the future of film commercials. 
One of these, Eastern Effects, which 
does opticals and special effects in 
film commercials, is now installing a 
complete aerial image system, includ- 
ing both an animation stand and 
printer. (The aerial image system 
makes possible the simultaneous com- 
bination of half a dozen different 
visual sources.) Its advantage over 
other systems is that it combines pro- 
jected images with opaque art work 
images for continuous open visual 
inspection frame by frame while the 
work is in progress. Hitherto, the re- 
sults of such combinations could only 
be checked days later when the prints 
came back from being processed. 

A major creative trend for 1959 



tXPANDIN 



MOST MODERN FACILITIE 



VIDEO TAP 
SERVICES 



TECHNICAL CREW 



ENGINEERS 



IATSE EXCLUSIVE 



ttRM/A// 



1 440 Broadway 

New York 18, New York 

telephone: PEnnsylvania 6-6323 



52 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



T.l . spot editor 

A column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

S A RR A 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




STJOSEPH. 

♦ ASPIRIN* 
FOR Cfti^EM 




Miss Rheingold of 1959, Robbin Bain, has been selected in the second largest 
election in the country. The five minute spectacular, featuring Marge and 
Gower Champion and introducing the six contestants, and asking the public 
to vote, was a most important feature in this campaign. Produced by SARRA 
for LIEBMANN BREWERIES, INC. through FOOTE, CONE & BELDING. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



This new ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN spot combines stop- 
motion, animation and live action. It stresses the fact that the proper dosage 
is in each tablet and that the safety cap protects them from busy little hands. 
The Regular ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN is also sold with dignity to make ST. 
JOSEPH the "Family Aspirin Pair." One of a series created and produced 
by SARRA for PLOUGH, INCORPORATED through LAKE-SPIRO- 
SHURMAN, INC. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



"Nancy has a boy friend . . ." chants little sister as she twirls her beautifully 
"ALL" laundered dress. The rhythm of her motion is the device used to 
show the rhythm of the washing machine where "ALL" conquers the suds 
overloading problem. One of a series produced bv SARRA for LEVER 
BROTHERS COMPANY through NEEDHAM, LOUIS and BRORBY, INC. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



SYRACUSE CAREFREE CHINA is all that the name implies. Real china 
that is dish water proof, stain proof and oven proof. The tianslucency shows 
the fine quality of the china and an amazing demonstration of hammering 
a nail through a wooden board with a coffee cup shows why it is guaranteed 
lor a year against breaking, chipping or cracking. Produced bv SARRA for 
SYRACUSE CHINA CORPORATION through REACH, McCLINTON 
and CO., INC. 



IRIIMI 
LlfoJfiOOUCERS 
Uf^ ssonmnn| 

OF NEW VORK 



SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



•ONSOK 



17 JANUARY 1959 



53 



that emerged in the closing weeks of 
last year is the new "squeeze" or slide 
motion technique in film commer- 
cials. Transfilm and several other 
producers led off the movement which 
combines some of the advantages of 
live-action with a number of anima- 
tion factors. The technique is in it- 
self not new; it was known as "filmo- 
graph" long ago. The process in- 
volves the use of a large number of 
still photographs or items of art work 
which get the appearance of action 
under the animation camera, which 
zooms, pans, pops-on, etc. In short, 
the material is mainly still stuff; the 
movement is in the camera. (See 
photos on pages 50-51.) 

Two important uses for this tech- 
nique are: 

• To achieve compressed impact 
in a high quality tv commercial. 

• To obtain economy for the local 
or regional commercial (and in in- 
dustrial films not intended for tv). 

Many advertisers saw at once the 
creative possibilities of "squeeze" mo- 
tion and started an impressive band- 
wagon for it. Orders for this new 
type of film commercial were placed 
by Ford through J. Walter Thomp- 



son, Chemstrand nylon through Doyle 
Dane Bernbach, Aero Shave through 
J. Walter Thompson, Instant Sanka 
through Young & Rubicam, Tek 
Hughes also through Young & Rubi- 
cam, and Esso through McCann- 
Erickson. A total of about 25 com- 
mercials have been delivered to these 
clients so far by Transfilm alone. 

According to Tom Whitesell, pro- 
duction v.p. of Transfilm, the advan- 
tage of the new technique is that 
waste motion is eliminated, and con- 
sequently "a great deal more of the 
sponsor's message can be put into 
one of these commercials." Economy 
can be an important factor, too. Rob- 
ert Bergmann, tv v.p. of Transfilm, 
pointed out that no technique has 
caught on as fast as this one in his 
company's entire decade of experi- 
ence with tv film commercials. 

The theory behind the slide motion 
commerical (or "squeeze" motion, as 
it is also called) is surprisingly sim- 
ple. "The viewer," says Bergmann. 
"can grasp a great deal more from a 
commercial in a short time than what 
many might expect." He cited the 
training devices used by the U. S. 




OPff&US 




ART TO FILM 

. . . finest and fastest 



MAURICE SAM MAX LEVY 



333 WEST 52ND STREET NEW YORK 19. N. Y. 



CI 5-5280 




OF NEW YORK 



I 



Armed Forces for identification train.| 
ing — the tachistoscope, which pro-: 
duces an effective image although 
flashed for only l/150th of a second. 

Credit for the new technique is 
ascribed to James Manilla, a produc- 
er at McCann-Erickson, who made a 
pilot film some seasons ago that was 
screened but never aired. In the proc-: 
ess, many agency producers became 
familiar with it. A year ago, Young 
& Rubicam made the first spot of this 
type to be telecast. The client wag 
Johnson & Johnson on behalf ol 
Band-Aid Sheer Strips. 

Last summer Chemstrand nylor 
tried the new technique and won oi 
recent Venice Advertising Film Festi 
val award for it. Since getting thd 
recognition, the new technique ha 
been assured of widespread creativi 
attention. 

Like cartoon animation, th 
"squeeze" motion commercial start 
with a sound track with complet 
music, voice, and effects. Then stii 
photographs are taken — usually vary 
ing from 150 to 500 in number — an 
from these 50 to 100 are selected b 
the animation department. The en 
tire process usually takes from thre 
to four weeks to complete. 

Incidentally, one of the conse 
quences of using the visual-squeeze 
technique is that agency men mus 
show flexibility in taking on nev 
roles. Within Harry Treleaven's Fori 
account section at J. Walter Thomr 
son some of the changes that too 
place in working on one commercia 
were these: Jack Wohl, usually a 
art director, became the producer o 
one Ford spot and shared copy cred 
its with another writer in addition t 
his usual art responsibilities. 

Because of its adaptability to an 
graphic technique, the visual-squeez 
commercial may well have flung ope 
the lid of a Pandora's box of net 
creativity in film commercials for th 
coming months. 

Film-tape balance sheet 

So on balance it's already clea 
that a stampede from film to tape 
which was regarded as possible 
few weeks ago — is now regarded a 
very unlikely. Two principle force 
are at work which will make am trai 
sition that may occur in the directio 
of tape a gradual rather than a 
abrupt one. First, agencies and cl 
ents have to get their feet wet an 
find out how and when they'll want t 



54 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195, 



* 





TELESTUDIOS IS THE INDUSTRY'S LARGEST CUS- 
TOM VIDEOTAPE PRODUCER. It's all yours at 
NTA'S TELESTUDIOS: 4 broadcast camera 
chains per studio— 3 Ampex Videotape re- 
corders, with more on the way-high quality 
16mm Kinescope recorder — complete re- 
mote facilities— 35mm and 16mm film 
chain— 1959 RCA wipe and special effects 
amplifier — 70-circuit dimmer boards — 
Zoomar lenses — matting amplifiers — and 
most important, top level camera crews. 
CUSTOM SERVICE KEYNOTES NTA'S TELESTUDIOS 
OPERATION. Every member of the NTA'S 
TELESTUDIOS staff, every inch of space, 
every iota of equipment focuses on one 
objective: your production! It's the kind of 
red carpet treatment— the "take your time 
and do it right" treatment-the "custom 
service" treatment you always get from top 
to bottom with tape at NTA's Telestudios. 

NTA'S TELESTUDIOS IS THE MOST EXPERIENCED 
PRODUCER IN THE FIELD OF TAPE COMMERCIALS. 

Leo Burnett for Kellogg's, D.C. S.&S. for 
Noxzema, N. W. Ayer for Sealtest, Norman, 
Craig & Kummel for Speidel are just part 
of the great and growing list of distin- 
guished advertisers who call for and get 
more with tape at NTA'S TELESTUDIOS. 
More's the reason why you should join them. 
NTA'S TELESTUDIOS 1481 B'way.N.Y.-LO 3-6333 




NTA'S TELESTUDIOS: LEADING THE WAY WITH VIDEOTAPE! 



use the new medium. Widespread 
abandonment of film commercials is 
out of the question. Second, the pro- 
ducers themselves are a conservative 
force. For varying reasons, many 
are reluctant to give up their usual 
film income, and still others may shy 
away from tape entirely. 

Some film producers, in fact, will 
flatly ignore tape and just go on do- 
ing business with film clients. The 
philosophy behind this point of view 
is this: at the moment tape business 
to some extent represents a substitu- 
tion for live fare on network pro- 
grams. The film producer can ration- 
alize that he isn't losing anything 
through the rise of tape because 
much tape production is business the 
film producer never had in the first 
place. 

Better business practices 

One of the signs of the new status 
of the creative side of tv commer- 
cials is a guild-association being 
formed by three leading factors in 
musical commercials production. The 
main purpose of this group is to take 
a lot of the guesswork out of the use 
of music in commercials. One of the 



agency problems is that prices some- 
times vary tremendously, and thus 
it's hard to find out which song- 
writers, arrangers, musical effects 
specialists, and performers are avail- 
able. The new guild, which will for- 
mally announce its formation in a few 
weeks, will attempt to stabilize and 
standardize prices and to simplify the 
problem of negotiation with talent. 
Equally important is its presentation 
of a set of ethical standards for the 
musical commercials industry, with 
only those producers meeting the re- 
quirements of good business and cre- 
ative practices being admitted to the 
guild. 

Another aspect of the maturity of 
the film commercials producers may 
be seen in the activities of the Film 
Producers Assn. This organization, 
which includes approximately three 
dozen New York producers (plus a 
number of New York service com- 
panies as associate members), holds 
monthly meetings to discuss problems 
and opportunities of the film indus- 
try. It holds "Showcases of Tv Com- 
mercials and Techniques" for agen- 
cies and their clients. New develop- 
ments and questions of an all-industry 



nature are discussed regularly at open 
meetings. Last November, for exam- 
ple, the FPA stated the case for New 
York as a production center at 
meeting of New York Chapter of the 
Television Academy of Arts & Sci- 
ences. The FPA has also been active 
in helping stabilize industry-wide la- 
bor relations. 

One important function of the FPA 
has been its public relations services 
for the film producers. While some 
producers such as MPO, Filmways, 
and Transfilm have public relations 
departments of their own or engage 
outside public relations firms, many 
of the smaller producers are not able 
to budget for publicity expenses. In 
recent months, the FPA's public rela- 
tions council, Wallace A. Ross Enter- 
prises, has been a liaison between 
the Eastern producers and the public. 

New creative look 

With live-action continuing to 
dominate film commercials produc- 
tion, there's a tendency to diversify 
by using more location shooting. A 
number of new commercials "styles' 
that have moved away from strict 
studio realism indicate that excellent 




A new name in New York film production, with familiar faces and familiar places. 




OF NEW VOfi 



The faces* EDWIN T. KASPER, former presi- 
dent and co-founder of FILMWAYS. 
INC. 

LEW POLLACK, founder and presi- 
dent of LEW POLLACK PRODUC- 
TIONS, INC. 

PLUS a complete staff of experi- 
enced production personnel. 




The places: The Lew Pollack Production 
Studios at 321 West 44 Street 
and the former West Coast Sound 
Studios at 510 West 57 Street. 



Two completely modernized air-condi- 
tioned mid-town stages with on-premise 
facilities for set design and construction — 
editing, sound recording with RCA and 
AMPEX film and tape channels. 

Twenty-thousand square feet of produc- 
tion area to provide you and your client 
with the utmost in quality and service. 

A formula for 

qualify motion picture 

production. 

PRODUCTIONS 

321 WEST 44 STREET 
N. Y. C. JU 2-8082 



56 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195C 



CLIP OUT AND SAVE THIS DIRECTORY OF 
lOO ACTIVE TV COMMERCIALS PRODUCERS 

NEW YORK 



Company 



Address 



Phone 



American Film Producers, 1600 Broadwa) PL 7-591S 

iAudio Productions, 630 Ninth Ave.*. PL 7-0760 

■John Bransby Productions, I860 Broadway* JU 6-2600 

Lars Calonius Productions, 45 West 45th St.#... ...PL 7-0350 

j~aravel Films, 20 West End Ave* CI 7-6110 

Cineffects, 115 West 45th St.*# ...CI 6-0951 

ihamus Culhane Productions, 207 Fast 37th St.*# MU 2-6812 

:raven Film Corp., 330 East 56th St.* Ml! 8-1585 

lobert Davis Productions, 21 East 63rd St. TE 8-8410 

Igfene Deitch Associates, 43 West 61st St.# CI 7-1970 

Oynamic Films, 405 Park Avenue* PL 1-7447 

Lstern Effects, 333 West 52nd St.*#.... CI 5-5280 

ilectra Films, 33 West 46th St.# JU 2-3606 

I'eter Elgar Productions, 75 West 45th St.*t JU 6-1870 

illiott, linger & Elliott, 414 West 54th St.*? JU 6-5582 

l : ilmways, 18 East 50th St.*tl PL 1-2500 

'•ilm Opticals, 421 West 54th St.#.~. PL 7-7120 

i : CI Productions, 66 Fifth Avenue CI 6-4127 

iordel Films, 1187 llniversity Ave.*. WY 2-5000 

Villiam J. Gam Co., 40 East 49th St.* EL 5-1443 

herald Productions, 421 West 54th St.*. ...PL 7-2125 

iJifford Animation, 165 West 46th St.# ...JU 2-1591 

lioulding-Elliott-Graham, 420 Lexington AveJ.... LE 2-9014 

iray-O'Reilly Studio, 480 Lexington Ave.*.. YU 6-4070 

HFH Productions, 38 West 48th St.. . JU 2-5055 

Hankinson Studios, 15 West 46th St. ... ....JU 6-0133 

Hartley Productions, 339 East 48th St. EL 5-7762 

am Handy Organization, 1775 Broadway J U 2-4060 

laeger Productions, 16 Broadway* JU 2-5730 

.obert Lawrence Productions, 418 West 54th St.*t JU 2-5242 

ames Love Productions, 115 West 45th St. ....JU 2-4633 

IcConnachie Productions, 730 Fifth Ave ..JU 2-0123 

1GM-TV, 1540 Broadwayt JU 2-2000 

IPO TV Films, 15 West 53rd St.*t— MU 8-7830 

)wen Murphy Productions, 723 Seventh Ave.* ... PL 7-8144 

lational Screen Service, 509 Madison Ave.*t CI 6-5700 

)n Film, Inc., Princeton, N. J.t (Tel. Walnut 1-17001 

athescope, 10 Columbus Circle* ...PL 7-5200 

elican Films, 46 West 46th St.# ... CI 6-1751 

I avid Piel Productions, 562 Fifth Avenue# CO 5-3382 

intoff Productions, 64 East 55th St.# ... EL 5-1431 

obert Richie Productions, 666 Fifth Avenue*.... CI 6-0191 

ma, 200 East 56th St.*... MU 8-0085 

etcher Smith Studios, 321 East 44th St.*.. MU 5-9010 

>und Masters, 165 West 46th St.*.... PL 7-6600 

enry Strauss & Co., 31 West 53rd St.*. ... ....PL 7-0651 

oryboard, 10 West 74th St.# .... TR 3-7207 

'ilbur Streech Productions, 135 West 52nd St. JU 2-3816 

' : II Sturm Studios, 49 West 45th St.*# JU 6-1650 

abert Swanson Productions, 1 East 54th St. ... MU 8-4355 

I Graphics, 369 Lexington Ave.*# PE 6-2923 



production office; some sales offices not listed 
specializes in animation and or effects 



FPA member 
t equipped for tape 

Continued on following page 



Contact 

Robert Gross 
Peter J. Mooncy 
John Campbell 
Lars Calonius 
David I. Pincus 
Nat Sobel 
Shamus Culhane 
Thomas Craven 
Robert Davis 
Gene Deitch 
Nathan Zucker 
Maurice Levy 
Abe Liss 
Peter Elgar 
Stephen Elliott 
Martin Ransohoff 
Leon Levy 
Gino Hollender 
Richard Kent 
William J. Ganz 
Gerald Auerbach 
Lewis Gifford 
Edward R. Graham 
James E. Gray 
Howard Henkin 
Fred Hankinson 
Irving Hartley 
Charles Bell 
Robert Klaeger 
R. L. Lawrence 
James Love 
Morton McConnachie 
J. Bower, P. Frank 
Judd Pollack 
Owen Murphy 
Robert Gruen 
Robert Bell 
Edward J. Lamm 
Jack Zander 
David Piel 
Ernest Pintoff 
Robert Richie 
Morris Behrend 
Fletcher Smith 
F. C. Wood Jr. 
Henry Strauss 
John Hubley 
Wilbur Streech 
Albert Hecht 
Robert Swanson 
Lee Blair 



•ONSOli 



17 JANUARY 1959 



footage l<> suil a particular mood can 
be achieved when a talented camera- 
man i> >cnt <ni location. Further, 
there's ihc advantage thai the crew 
needn't be large and thai nature is 
both free and available to all. 

Fantas) in its varying forms is an 
important ingredient in man) new 
creative approaches. While advocates 
of the "hard sell'" have had an un- 
deniable effect in moving drugs and 
certain other products, fine results 
have been obtained through the use 
of pleasureful, "soli sell" elements. 
too. In addition to location shoot- 
ing, a major approach to introducing 
pleasure into commercials is fantas) 
— with live-action shooting plus cine- 
matic tricks of editing, special effects, 
and the like. What's new here is the 
use of these elements to blend to- 
gether gently — a contrast with earliet 
uses of film devices to spur attentive- 
ness via irritating gimmicks. 

A major contribution to the fu- 
ture of animation in film production 
has been provided l>v the introduc- 
tion of new "aerial image" equip- 
ment. While "aerial image" systems 
were used in the past by Disnev and 
other motion picture animators, the 
new equipment available through the 
Animation Equipment Co. of New 
Rochelle. N. Y., can be operated in a 
normally lighted room; formerly, 
darkness was necessary. Animation 
stands and printers of this type have 
already been delivered to Eastern 
Effects. 

There are two obvious advantages 
to the new system: it makes produc- 
tion of new commercials easier and 
with better quality, and it also makes 
possible revision of existing commer- 
cials at low cost and with good re- 
sults. I Additional details on the 
"aerial image" system are given in 
other parts of this commercial sec- 
tion, i 

Rundown of producers 

An excellent index to recent accom- 
plishments and coming trends in film 
and tape commercials mav be bad b\ 
following the pulse of some of the 
leading producers in both fields. 

A sampling of significant activities 
at the studios of 19 producer- was 
obtained bv SPONSOR for this special 
commercials section. And pages .">7- 
r>$> list 100 producers ol commercials 
in New York, Eos Angeles, and Chi- 
cago — and even that listing docs not 
comprehend a number ol industry 



57 



CARAVEL 

Produces Commercials 
for 



RCA 
WHIRLPOOL 



Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 

CARAVEL 

Produces Commercials 
for 



GENERAL 
ELECTIC 



Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 
Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

CARAVEL 

Produces Commercials 
for 



GULF OIL 



Young & Rubicam, Inc. 

For your next commercial 
call — 




Caravel Films 

INCORPORATED 
20 WEST END AVENUE 

NEW YORK 




Circle 7-6110 



IOO COMMERCIALS PRODUCERS— Cont. 
NEW YORK CONTINUED 

Company Address Phone 

Telestudios (NTA), 1481 Broadway! ... _.LO 3-6333 

Terrytoons (CBS), 501 Madison Ave.# PL 1-2345 

Termini Video Tape, 1440 Broadway*! PE 6-6323 

Transfilm, 35 West 45th St.* _ JU 2-1400 

Universal Pictures, 445 Park Avenuet PL 9-8000 

United States Productions, 5 East 57th St. PL 1-1710 

UPA Pictures, 60 East 56th St.#t~ — -- PL 8-1405 

Van Praag Productions, 1600 Broadway*! PL 7-2687 

VPI Productions, 325 West 44th St. JL> 2-8082 

Videotape Productions, 205 West 58th St.t ... __JU 2-3300 

Roger Wade Productions, 15 West 46th St.*.... ......CI 5-3040 

Warner Bros., 666 Fifth Ave.t —CI 6-1000 

Wilding TV Pictures, 405 Park Avenue _.PL 9-0854 

Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy, 1600 Broadway* .CI 7-1600 

CHICAGO 

Academy Films, 123 West Chestnut....... MI 2-5877 

Chicago Film Studios, 56 E. Superior... WH 4-6971 

Filmaclc. 1327 S. Wabash HA 7-3395 

Dallas Jones Productions, 1725 N. Wells.. MO 4-5525 

Robert Lawrence Productions, 230 N. Michigan .FK 2-6431 

Fred A. Niles Productions, 1058 W. Washington!. . SE 8-4181 

Sarra, 16 East Ontariot-- WH 4-5151 

Ross Wetzel Studios, 615 N. Wabash Ave.# _SU 7-2755 

Wilding TV Pictures, 1345 W. Argyle ... LO 1-8410 

Jam Handy Organization, 230 N. Michigan! ......ST 2-6757 

LOS ANGELES 

Animation, Inc., 736 N. Seward# HO 4-1117 

Cascade Pictures, 1027 N. Sewardt _ HO 2-6481 

Desilu Productions, 780 Gower __ ...HO 9-5911 

Jerry Fairbanks Productions, 1330 Vine HO 2-1101 

Filmways, 1040 Las Palmast ...HO 5-9835 

Four Star Films, 1417 N. Western HO 2-6231 

Stan Freberg Ltd., 7781 Sunset HO 2-6973 

Harris-Tuchman Productions, 751 N. Highland ... WE 6-7189 

Grantray-Lawrence Prodns, 716 N. LaBrea#t WE 6-8158 

Sherman Glas Prodns, 7015 Sunset# ... ...HO 7-8151 

Lawrence-Schnitzer Prodns., 1040 N. Las Palmast HO 7-3111 

Lou Lilly Prodns, 5746 Sunset HO 5-6325 

MGM-TV, Culver Cityt- - _ - -TE 0-3311 

MPO TV Films, 4024 Radfordt-- - -PO 3-8411 

National Screen Service, 7026 Santa Monicat HO 5-3136 

Playhouse Pictures, 1401 N. LaBrea# ...HO 5-2193 

Hal Roach Studios, 8822 W. Washington ....TE 0-3361 

TV Spots, Inc., 1037 N. Cole _... -..HO 5-5171 

TCF Prodns, 1417 N. Western.... _ _HO 2-6231 

Universal Pictures, Universal City ST 7-1212 

UPA Pictures, 4440 Lakeside, Burbank# TH 2-7171 

Van Praag Productions, 1040 N. Las Palmast ... HO 2-1141 

Warner Bros., 4000 Warner, Burbankt .... HO 9-1251 



t production office; some sales offices not listed 
# specializes in animation and/or effects 



FPA member 
t equipped for tape 



Contact 

George Gould 
William Weiss 
Anthony Termini 
Robert Bergmann 
Norman Gluck 
Francis Thayer 
Jack Silverman 
William Van Praag 
Lew Pollack 
Howard Meighan 
Roger Wade 
Joseph Lamneck 
Russ Raycroft 
Harold Wondsel 



Bernard Howard 
Robert Casterhue 
Irving Mack 
Dallas Jones 
Len Levy 
Fred Niles 
Robert L. Foster 
Ross Wetzel 
Michael Stehney 
Harold Dash 



Earl Klein 
Barney Carr 
Lee Savin 
Jerry Fairbanks 
Tom Connors 
Walter Bien 
Bob Klein 
Ralph Tuchman 
Grant Simmons 
Sherman Glas 
Gerald Schnitzer 
Lou Lilly 
William Gibbs 
Melvin Dellar 
Lou Harris 
Adrian Woolery 
Jack Reynolds 
Shun Bonsall 
Irving Asher 
George Bole 
Stephen Bosustow 
Donald Kraatz 
David DePatie 



OF NEW YORK 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195* 



. 



factors, nor did space considerations 
make a complete listing of sales 
I branches possible. 

However, when used together with 
that directory — which may he clipped 
out for permanent reference; — the fol- 
lowing will provide significant de- 
tails and information on film and tape 
producer activities and topics. 

Tape era begins 

While more than half a dozen com- 
mercials producers have installed tape 
facilities, only a few delivered that 
t\pe of product to clients in 1958. In 
New York, NTA's Telestudios, Film- 
uavs. Elliot, Unger & Eliot, Howard 
Meighan's Videotape Productions, 
and Termini Video Tape Services 
purchased recorders and put them in 
operation. On the West Coast, Cas- 
cade Pictures was among the pro- 
ducers that went into tape. And all 
i>\cr the country, networks, stations 
and other broadcasting groups offered 
tape commercials services. 

Telestudios produced tape com- 
mercials with several agencies: 
through Leo Burnett for Kellogg; 
through N. W. Ayer for Sealtest and 
Johnson & Johnson; through Reach, 



for the finest in . . . 

I ANIMATION STANDS 
OPTICAL PRINTERS 



the leading developer 

of animation stands 

and optical 

printing equipment: 

the new 

OXBERRY 35/ 16mm 

process camera and 

new "Standard" Series 

Animation Stand 




Write for free 



OF NEW YC 

illustrated brochure 



THE 



ANIMATION EQUIPMENT 



CORP 



18 HUDSON STREET 
^EWROCHELLE, N.Y. 



McClinton & Co. for Prudential and 
Breck; through Maxon for Gillette; 
through DCSS for Noxzema; through 
Lennen & Newell for Newport; 
through Foote, Cone & Belding for 
Savarin; and through Cunningham & 
Walsh for Super Suds. Telestudios is 
now expanding facilities, installing a 
second large studio in addition to a 
third smaller one for special require- 
ments. 

Filmways delivered several tape 
commercials to clients in 1958, and 
has orders for more tape work this 
year. They are using tape extensively 
as a rehearsal device for film, per- 
mitting clients to see exactly what 
they'll get on film days in advance 
of the completion of film processing. 
Among the advertisers that have had 
their commercials produced in this 
film-plus-tape studio are Ford and 
Eastman Kodak. 

Elliot, Unger & Elliot has had 
tape equipment in experimental use 
for several months. Videotape Pro- 
ductions has installed a massive stu- 
dio for tape, and Howard Meighan 
has embarked on an ambitious liaison 
campaign to educate both Ampex and 
agencies to each other's needs and 
problems. Termini also has facilities 
available to do commercials and other 
work. 

Meanwhile a growing number of 
stations also have been active in pro- 
moting tape for local commercials. 
It's a practical way for them to write 
off part of the initial cost of installing 
tape recorders. 

Industry developments 

National advertisers have almost all 
of their film commercials produced in 
New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago ; 
other cities do occasional national 
work plus a good deal of regional and 
local film commercials business. 

New York is the principal center of 
commercials production. It has at- 
tracted the film people who regard 
commercials as their main work. One 
problem sometimes voiced about West 
Coast production is that some com- 
panies regard programs as their im- 
portant business and commercials as 
secondary. Several active companies 
operate in Chicago, although that city- 
is the least productive of the three 
major commercial centers. 

Here are highlights of late develop- 
ments, outlooks, and results among 
film producers across the countrv. 




OF NEW YORK 



ROBERT 

SWANSON 

PRODUCTIONS 

Musical commercials 

to cover 

the whole scale 

of your 

advertising needs. 

689 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

Murray Hill 8-4355 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



.VI 



fr 



SOME 







ABOUT 



TV FILM 

COMMERCIAL 

PRODUCTION 



Telephone: JUdson 2-1400 
35 WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 



■ LTfojRODUCERS 

■ llroWSOCIMIOH 




Naturally, every film studio promises the 
finest production and the finest service — 
and certainly there's no reason to doubt 
their intentions. 

But Transfilm is in a better position than 
most others to back up its promises. You're 
entitled to know why. 

1. Top personnel. Many studios at- 
tempt to assemble crews of first class free- 
lance craftsmen. But, Transfilm already has 
a permanent team of top caliber creative 
personnel that clients say looks like a 
"Who's Who" of TV film production. And, 
it's a championship team because they've 
been working together for years. Look it over 
and judge for yourself. 

2. Completely integrated facilities. 

Most studios offer adequate facilities. But 
Transfilm offers complete facilities all un - 
der one roof . For example: 

• a fully equipped, air-conditioned sound 

studio 

• a complete animation department 

• a complete art service 

• the latest in animation cameras and 

optical cameras 

• a distinguished editorial service 

• a modern, air-conditioned 16 mm and 

35 mm projection room 
Thus we take complete responsibilit y for 
the whole j ob . 

3. Systematized service. Transfilm 
has evolved a system of organization that 
enables us to give superior personal service. 
Each job force has a producer, who heads 
the production team, and a production 
supervisor who is directly responsible to the 
client. Thus the client keeps on top of the 
job at all times. 

This way of doing business has made 
sense to an impressive list of clients. If it 
makes sense to you, too, please let us talk 
to you about your next film job. 



TRANSFILM 

INCORPORATED 



PRODUCERS OF QUALITY FILMS TO FIT EVERY BUDGET 



fREB! GIGANTIC CATALOG 




176 pages; more than 8000 
different items with prices 
and over 500 illustrations. For 
Producers, TV Stations, Film 
Labs., Industrial Organiza- 
tions, Educational Institu-, 
tions, etc. I 



morion 

PICTURE & TU 



EQUIPIHEIIT 



IipiLMI 
LTrsporas 
Ufg| SSOCIflIID»| 

OF NEW YORK 



S.O.S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP., 602 West 52nd St., N.Y.C. 19 
WESTERN BRANCH: 6331 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. 

• Make Request for this Comprehensive Catalog on Your Company Letterhead. 



• Audio Productions, with an 
eye toward bolstering its share of the 
business, has named Tom Farrell as 
account executive covering New York 
agencies. 

• Caravel Films has been pro- 
ducing commercials "spectaculars" in 
its new $1 million* studio facilities; 
clients recently have included RCA 
Whirlpool. General Electric, U. S. 
Steel, and Gulf Oil. 

• Craven Film Corp. has added 
two new studios and opened new 
offices in Los Angeles, New Delhi, and 
Ottawa. Gross volume was up 22% 
in the last quarter of 1958. 

• Shamus Culhane reports a 
heavy influx of new business and has 
consolidated its production facilities 
in New York where work is under the 
personal supervision of Culhane him- 
self. Outside the commercials field, 
recent productions include a tv comic 
strip for Interstate TV, Showdown at 
Ulcer Gulch — a promotional film for 
the Saturday Evening Post, and an 
astronautic series for the AVCO Man- 
ufacturing Co. 

• Peter Elgar Productions, now 
shooting a third series of tv commer- 
cials for Zest, also has been filming 
full-scale production assignments at 
its Cypress Gardens facilities. 

• Elliot, Unger & Elliot, which 
bears down hard in the creative end, 
entered the business originally as a 
still-photography organization and 
represents a force for high style-fash- 
ions in commercials. Last fall, EUE 
acquired the old Vidicam studio in 
New York as a tape studio and has 
invested several hundred thousand 
dollars in tape equipment and experi- 
mentation. 

• Filmways has recently expand- 
ed both its film and tape facilities in 
New York, including recent purchase 
of three image orthicon tv cameras 
for its tape operation. One utilization 
for tape at its studios is as a rehearsal 
device for commercials being filmed. 
Filmways made an offering of 154,000 
shares of public stock, now being 
traded actively. 

• HFH Productions is an ag- 
gressive and young organization 
which was formed last year. In ad- 
dition to its animation and live- 
action services, HFH publishes an 
interesting newsletter to the trade, 
called Between Takes. 

• Robert Lawrence of New York 
has established a number of affiliates 
in other principal cities. New York 



60 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



Ve.the members of the 



fnRODUCI 
■QSSOCIRIION 

OF NEVA/ YORK 

re pledged to provide you 
rith the utmost in 
uality. Responsibility, 
nd Service. 



EMBERS 

DIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

HN BRANSBY PRODUCTIONS 

RAVEL FILMS. INC. 

AVEN FILM CORP. 

AMUS CULHANE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

NAMIC FILMS, INC. 

TER ELCAR PRODUCT'ONS. INC. 

JOT, UNCER & ELLIOT, INC. 

MWAYS, INC. 

RDEL FILMS, INC. 

LLIAM J. CANZ & CO., INC. 
.RALD PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
■ AY-O'REILLY STUDIO 
IBERT LAWRENCE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
iO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
ITIONAL SCREEN SERVICE CORP. 
"EN MURPHY PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
ITHESCOPE COMPANY OF AMERICA, INC. 
IBERT YARNALL RICHIE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
:*RA, INC. 

IITCHER SMITH STUDIOS. INC. 
•JND MASTERS. INC. 
INRY STRAUSS & CO.. INC. 
I L STURM STUDIOS. INC. 
" & FILM CRAPHICS, INC. 
'4NSFILM. INC. 

'N PRAAC PRODUCTIONS. INC 
' PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
ICER WADE PRODUCTIONS. INC 
MNDSEL. CARLISLE & DUNPHY, INC. 

SOCIATE MEMBERS 

"E ANIMATION EQUIPMENT CORP. 
I BARNES & CO., INC. 
"E CAMERA MART, INC. 
(MERA EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 
HEFFECTS, INC. 
(LOR SERVICE CO. 
(NSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 
I ART FILM LABS, INC. 
hTERN EFFECTS, INC. 
DRMAN & BABB, INC. 
<LD MEDAL STUDIOS. INC. 
I CCA FILM LABS, INC. 
t VIELAB FILM LABS, INC. 
I THE LABORATORIES, INC. 
IICISION FILM LABORATORIES 
liVIEW THEATRE, INC. 
DDUCTION CENTER, INC. 
IVES SOUND STUDIOS, INC. 
I.S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP. 
"IMINI VIDEOTAPE SERVICE 
" RA FILM LABS. INC. 



F, 



FIRODUCERS 
QSSOCIRTION 



Send for FPA's 
Directory of N. Y. 
Film Services 



EAST 4BTH ST., NEW YORK 17 • PLAZA 1-1920 



Facilities include its lake-over <>l the 
animation stand formerly used l>\ 
UPA. One of the first firms to go into 
tv commercials production. Lawrence 
makes nothing but commercials and 

also maintains facilities in Hollyw I 

(Lawrence-Schnitzer Productions i 
and in Canada. 

• MPO, which increased its vol- 
ume by 7.V < in 1958, now has use of 
Republic Picture stages in Hollywood 
as well as its five sound stages in New 
York. An important technical inno- 
vation introduced by MPO is the 
infra-red process of automatic travel- 
ing matting with an exclusive license 
for the Pickney process in the East. 
( Cascade has it in the West. I Last 
year MPO increased its roster of di- 
rectors to eight, and established a live 
presentations division under Bert G. 
Shevelove. MPO has not yet made 
anv commitments to use tape. 

• National Screen Service, one 
of the oldest companies in the busi- 
ness of producing films for advertis- 
ing and best known for its theatrical 
trailers, is making a coast-to-coast 
push for commercials business in 
1959 under industrial and commer- 
cials division manager Robert Gruen. 

• Fred Niles productions of Chi- 
cago has acquired the facilities for- 
merly occupied by Kling. It reports 
its annual volume to be $2 million, 
which is approximately 70% of com- 
mercials business placed in Chicago. 
Late in 1958, Niles established an im- 
portant liaison with the French pro- 
ducer. Andre Sarrut. Although much 
of Niles' income is from Midwest 
spenders. East and West coast orders 
also are important. Niles intends to 
enter tape production. 

• Playhouse Pictures, Holly- 
wood animation specialists, was 
founded in 1952 by Adrian Woolery, 
current owner and president of the 
firm. His animation facilities are 
claimed to be the newest in Holly- 
wood, with sp?ce for a staff of 25 
for complete animation production 
services. 

• Sarra of New York and Chicago 
also entered the tv commercials field 
via the still-photography route. Sarra 
anticipates a considerable business in- 
crease in 1959 and is acquiring addi- 
tional space and facilities in New 
York. The Chicago office reports an 
increase of business formerly assigned 
to the West Coast, and the appoint- 
ment of two additional staff members: 
Bill Newtoti as producer-director and 



1 



Ilifl 



there is a 






r.KLi AL 



on Radio & Television 

building sales 

in every major market 

for all kinds of products 



( * Current Broadcast Schedules 

29^60 
average over Tg£"6£^ per week) 



PHIL DAVIT 

MUSICAL ENTERPRISES 

MUrray Hill 8-3950 

59 East 54 Street New York 22 



POMSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



61 



Chuck Zornig as a director. 

• Sound Masters, which prepared 
sales films for New York Central Rail- 
road. Republic, Lockheed, and other 
companies, anticipates an increase in 
"hard sell ' commercials using a hold, 
direct style with simple graphics. 

• Bill Sturm Studios has ex- 
panded its New York facilities and 
has appointed Don McCormick as 
studio supervisor. They also have ac- 
quired exclusive stop-motion and pup- 
pet equipment for general animation 
use and in conjunction with live film- 
ing. Jacques Dufour, winner of a re- 
cent Art Director's Award has been 
appointed head designer. 

• TV & Film Graphics moved to 
larger studios and offices on 1 Janu- 
ary so it could offer a variety of spe- 
cial techniques such as live-animation 
combinations, rear screen process, 
stop-motion, and other devices; a vol- 
ume increase of 15-20% is reported 
for 1958 over the previous year. 

• Termini Video Tape Services 
is offering tape services to producers 



and plans to acquire a mobile tape 
unit in addition to its present studio 
equipment. 

• Transfilm, which has spear- 
headed the creative vogue of "squeeze" 
or slide-motion in commercials, now 
has two separate tv commercials staffs, 
an account and creative division un- 
der v.p. Robert Bergmann and a pro- 
duction division under v.p. Thomas 
Whitesell. Transfilm's participation 
with Doyle Dane Bernbach in produc- 
tion of the Chemstrand nylon com- 
mercials won the recent Venice Ad- 
vertising Film Festival award. 

• Van Praag Productions has 
appointed Hal Persons as account su- 
pervisor. Last year Van Praag 
branched out from auto clients into 
the wider fields of cosmetic, soap, and 
insurance commercials. Offices are in 
New York. Detroit, Miami, and Holly- 
wood. 

• Roger Wade Productions es- 
tablished a new animation and art 
department under Marvin Friedman, 
and expanded editing services under 



Howard Mann and the live action de-l 
partment under Philip Donohue and 
Bill Buckley. 

• Wilding has formed Wilding- 
TV, a new Chicago branch managed 
by Joseph Morton. Production facili- 
ties are now operated through its New 
York, Los Angeles, and Detroit 
branches as well. Wilding claims 35- 
40% increased in gross business last 
year. 

Among developments in the special- 
effects field are the following: 

• Eastern Effects has installed a 
new aerial-image animation stand and 
printer, a technical advance for film 
in 1959 which makes possible contin- 
uous visual inspection of a variety of 
live and animation sources while they 
are being combined. 

• S.O.S. Cinema Supply has de- 
veloped an electronic TEL-Anima 
print hot press titling machine with 
automatic quality controls and has 
motorized a TEL-Animastand for im 
proved special effects and animation 
results. ^ 



A U D 1 0" 

Jr%. K_j M.-W JL \ w 

al ore.) 

A ¥ J \\ T 4 > 

A ¥ T 11 1 

Jl 3k. \*_y M~Jr JL x. ~ 

AUDIO 

A.XJ DIO 

j£\. vj jl.9 JL v * 

AUDIO 
AUDIO 



jp J^ 




PROD 

PRODI 

Po/ )F)ITC r 

PRO DUCT I 

PRODUCTION 

PRODUCTION 



AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, INC 

630 Ninth Avenue, New York 36, N. Y. • PLaza 7-0760 



62 



SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1951 



STILL ANOTHER ARB SURVEY SHOWS 




holds the 



■ 






test snare 



of audience sign-on to sign-off 
in the 






x/V - . , . 




area 




What a record — "tops" in every ARB survey of the Raleigh-Durham 
area since WRAL-TV began operations! 

This latest report (Oct. -Nov. 1958) shows one-week 49.6% ar >d 
four-week 48.1% SHARE OF AUDIENCE, sign-on to sign-off. 

Get your share of the sales-building opportunities on Carolina's 
colorful Capital Station — check the availabilities today! 

4-CAMERA MOBILE UNIT • VIDEOTAPE RECORDER • LARGE NEW STUDIOS 



WRAL-TV 



TOP POWER CHANNEL 5, NBC, RALEIGH, N. C. 

covering North Carolina from Greensboro to the coast 
from Virginia to the South Carolina line 

REPRESENTED BY H-R, INC. 



'ONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



63 



a 



MARTIN MANULIS 
20* CENTURY FOX-TV PRODUCTION 

4 

MAX SHULMAN'S 
THE MANY LOVES OF DOBIE GILLIS" 

exciud iue da led rep red en la live 



me-tw 



INC. 



affiliate of GENERAL ARTISTS CORPORATION 

640 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 
CIRCLE 7-7543 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 
BEVERLY HILLS 
MIAMI BEACH 

DALLAS 

LONDON 

64 SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195 ( .j 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



17 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Latest among the national advertisers joining the trend into syndication is 
Lucky Strike with a regional buy to bolster its network schedules. 

The American Tobacco brand took alternate week sponsorship of MCA's Secret Agent 7 
in 34 Eastern markets for 26 weeks; agency is BBDO. 

A quick rundown of other cigarette money in syndication has American Tobacco on the 
NTA Film Network for Pall Mall cigarettes and Brown & Williamson in a regional with Mac- 
Kenzie's Raiders. Other brands such as Camels, Marlboro and L&M buying alternate week 
sponsorships in certain markets. 



There are three important contingencies upon which Ballantine's buy of Bold 
Venture in addition to Highway Patrol in up to 22 markets is understood to hinge. 

These are: (1) a satisfactory alternate week advertiser can be found so that half of High- 
way Patrol can be sold off, (2) choice time periods can be cleared in each market and (3) 
someone to split the costs of Bold Venture can be brought in — possibly the same buyer that 
takes Highway Patrol alternate weeks. 

The advantages of such a deal as this is that it doubles the advertiser's audience 
without increasing his program or time costs. 



A new combination of using video tape in equipped markets and kinescopes 
in other cities, now being tried by the Union Oil Co., could easily touch off a chain 
reaction of major importance. 

This solution of tape-plus-kinescope as a two-fold approach to get around coverage prob- 
lems has been suggested for a while by the tape men. 

But Union Oil's action in setting the example by striking out into this unexplored terri- 
tory is bound to find others of a similar disposition. 



Chicago this week entered the programing sweepstakes of the new year with 
two entries based on pastimes. 

They are: (1) Walter Schwimmer's Championship Bridge on film with Charles Goren 
and Alex Drier as m.c. and (2) Max Cooper's Winter Baseball on videotape from Havana. 
(For details, see Film Wrap-Up, page 74.) 



Another listing for FILM-SCOPE's occasional additions to the Department of 
Missing Syndication Buyers is this: the airlines. 

Since some airlines have regional service and virtually all of them do the majority of 
their business in the 30 largest cities, airlines have always seemed to be a logical nominee 
for the list of syndication buyers. 



One reason that airlines have generally stayed away from spot programs is they have 
been able to barter airline tickets for time with both network producers and indi- 
vidual stations. 



PONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



65 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



JNBC is taking the color potential of tape quite seriously. 

The network ordered 16 color conversion kits from Ampex at an estimated total cost of 
$300 thousand; NBC previously put $1.2 million into 27 black-and-white Ampex 
recorders. 

On the other hand, CBS and ABC are regarding color for tape with indifference. 

CBS ordered just two machines, one for New York and one for Los Angeles, and ABC 
has none. 

In comparison with NBC's 27 monochrome tape recorders, by the way, Ampex is deliver- 
ing 22 to CBS and 17 to ABC. 

Price tag of the VTR-1000 is 845,000, while color kits are $19,000. 



A new status for three or more companies is in the cards with Bud Barry's 
resignation as tv v.p. of Loew's. 

Barry is understood to have accepted a five-year offer to head up the NTA Film Network. 
Meanwhile, Loew's is considering offering the vacated post to the head of an active svn- 
dication company. 



ITC's production plans for 1959 continue to have a strong literary flavor. 

In addition to going ahead with an anthology based on Post stories which will have pro- 
duction divided between Hollywood and London, ITC will shoot 39 episodes of Treasury 
Agent, based on a book by a Washington correspondent. 



COMMERCIALS: Credit for introducing the new visual-squeeze or slide mo- 
tion technique to agency circles, a process that's now creating quite a stylistic 
vogue, has been given to James Manilla, a producer at McCann-Erickson. 

Manilla did this several season ago, but the fruits have sprung up just in the last few 
weeks. 

(For more on this process and other commercials news and trends, see the special sec- 
tion on tv commercials, pages 47-62.) 

Gallo wine is trying something new (like Union Oil) in using a combination 
of videotape and kinescope for its commercials. 

Spots were produced at KTTV on tape and will be offered to tape-equipped stations in 
that form with other outlets getting kinescopes. 

Film and commercials flashes: Hal Persons is new account supervisor for Van 
Praag Productions . . . Harry McMahan, former tv commercials v.p. at Leo Burnett, is ex- 
hibiting some 50 Venice Festival commercials of which four U. S. entries are Calo Cat Food, 
Duncan Hines Pancakes, Purina Dog Chow and Chemstrand Nylon . . . Eugene C. Wyatt 
becomes network sales v.p. of Bernard L. Schubert, Inc. . . . Arthur Spirt named midwest - 
ern sales manager and v.p. for Gross-Krasne-Sillerman . . . CBS Television Stations division 
appointed Robert Fuller publicity director for CBS Films and Howard Berk as owned 
stations and spot sales director of publicity . . . Correction: the name of William Holden 
appeared in this column erroneously last week as the star of Ziv's Moon Probe series; Wil- 
liam Lundigan is the star. 

fig SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195') 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



17 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



House Committee chairman Oren Harris pulled another one of his surprises this 
week: he introduced a bill that would permit more limited tests than the FCC has al- 
ready proposed. 

Harris heretofore had gone along with the Congressional trend to ban pay-tv. 
The substance of the Harris bill: 

• Bans pay-tv either by air or wire until Congress — not the FCC — specifically sets up 
ground rules for such a system. 

• The FCC would be required to go to court to stop any wired or air pay-tv system, if any 
entrepreneur persisted. 

• Technical tests would get the green light and there would be a limitation of no more 
than one market for any one system or any one interest. (Harris interpreted this provision as 
meaning actual "trial runs" would be permitted. To him "technical test" is tantamount to 
"commercial test".) 

Harris, however, said the FCC would have the power to prescribe limitations, which 
system in which city, how many homes might be served, how long the test would run, etc. 

Where the rub for commercial tv lies; It permits a loophole for permitting pay-tv to 
build up heavy public demand in the largest population centers. On the other hand, 
pay-tv advocates will roil at the fact they must still wait for an affirmative act of Congress. 



Rep. Harris had other chilling words for the broadcasting industry. 

In a statement accompanying his pay-tv bill, he expresed strong doubts that the system 
would do what its backers claim in the line of program improvement. He said in the absence 
of Federal regulation, pay-tv might merely add another financial burden to the taxpay- 
ing public. 

There was a big but. It went: "In my opinion, television programs available to the Ameri- 
can people have become highly commercialized, and their adequacy in the public interest, with 
respect to both their quality and their variety, has been questioned." 

He added, "plans are now under study for better enforcement of existing legislation and 
the enactment of new legislation for the purpose of bringing about better service in the public 
interest by commercial television licensees." 

This was a very broad threat, not modified or even explained elsewhere in the Harris 
statement, nor did Harris care to elucidate personally. 



The staff report of the Senate Commerce Committee, drawn up by special coun- 
sel Kenneth Cox, had sharp words for the FCC, which my now must be developing a 
thick collective hide. 

The FCC had dawdled about getting more tv service to rural areas, Cox charged. On- 
channel vhf boosters, now illegal and recently ruled against anew by the FCC, should be per- 
mitted, he added. 

Cox said a local tv station should be preferred, second in priority a half local-half 
satellite, third a full satellite, fourth devices such as translators and boosters, and last, the 
community antenna systems. 

He acknowledged that when a local station can provide only one network, and a lesser 
service can provide more services, the FCC would have to use its judgment about the public 
interest factors involved. 



1NSOI! 



17 JANUARY 1959 



67 



-J 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



17 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright I0W 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



Madison Avenue's latest self -kidding goes like this: 

The same outfit that turns out copy urging smokers to be non-conformist and think 
independently is hardly a model of those characteristics. 



Beer marketers expect 1959 sales to show a margin of between 2-4% as against 
the previous year. 

The figures could go either way, depending on the effect that the usually cold win 
ter will have on suds consumption. 

Smaller advertisers whose growth doesn't show prospects of improving will find a 
cooler climate among agencies in 1959. 

The attitude among agencies is this: If after a year or year-and-a-half the account 
doesn't look Like a money-maker, ask it to move elsewhere. 



The latest saturation splurge by L&M in spot tv is of such broad dimensions that 
competitive cigarette brands are having trouble getting into some of the same , 
markets. 

L&M apparently is hedging its network bets with huge doses of spot. 

Pete Levathes, who just took over the administration of Y&R's tv/radio department t 
actually got his start in the business as a show producer and saleman. 

He produced (via 20th Century -Fox) the first regularly scheduled tv film news sej I 
ries, which evolved into the Camel News Caravan, and sold Crusade in Europe to Y&Bj 

for Life Magazine. 



68 



Stations henceforth may do a little more research before changing their call 
letters as the result of the embarrassment experienced by a Southwest station. 

Its new call letters befit the military installations in that area, but to bi-lingual listener! 
they have a questionable connotation. 



J 



Take this occurrence of the past week on Madison Avenue as an example of how 
formula buying system may trap you: 

Told to buy the highest-rated stations between 7-9 a.m., a timebuyer rejected a 3.2 
station in favor of a 3.6 station — even though the former had a 50% less cost-peri 
thousand. 

Explained the timebuyer: "We're buying ratings, not top cost-pers." 

A Park Avenue agency was able to buy radio spots for a continental carrier a 
local rates by reminding stations of this: 

Not so long ago the same stations granted the local rate directly to a cleanse! 
account which likewise was on a national basis. 

Added the agency: "We can't be put in the position of letting you discriminati 
against any of our accounts. It's either the local rate for all or none." 

SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 195! 



%e 



GrueaL 
i£bun 

MuALC 



«& ft 



*% 



. t ; 



Sa 






of 



X/VV, 



y y / / / / / 

S s y y y y 




y 



y y* 



Hothing else like it 

in Greater New York 

IN PROGRAMMING: The voice of WVNJ is 
unique. It's the only radio station in the entire 
Metropolitan New York area that plays 
just Great Albums of Music from sign on to 
sign off — 365 days a year. 

IN AUDIENCE: So different, too. So largely- 
adult — so able to buy — so able to persuade 
others to buy. And in Essex County alone 
(pop. 983,000) WVNJ dominates in 
audience — in quality of audience — 
and in prestige. 

IN VALUE: It delivers the greater New York 
audience for less than 31c per thousand homes — 
by far the lowest cost of any radio station 
in the market. 



■i 



l» 



t I 



RADIO STATION OF '(The &Ctt)«nk ^CWS 

national rep: Broadca$t Time Sales • New York, N. V. • MU 4-6740 



* » 



K 



Newark, N. J.— covering New York and New Jersey* 



ONsoi; 



17 JANUARY 1959 



69 



Small space. 
Big story. 



WMT-TV, represented nationally 
by The Katz Agency, covers over 
half of the tv families in Iowa, 
dominates Cedar Rapids, Waterloo 
and Dubuque, three of Iowa's six 
largest cities. 



,L 




5000 WATTS 

Arkansas' ONLY Negro station • In' 
Little Rock - the 87th Market — 33% 
Negro • Top-rated consistently by 
Hooper-O Connor • The ONLY way 
to the 114,000 Negroes of the Little 
Rock-Pine Bluff Metropolitan Area. 



i3 MIT il i . 




of JACKSON 
on WOK J 

of BIRMINGHAM 

on WENN 

of SHREVEPORT 

on KOKA 

wmmmm—m 



•bony radio 



70 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, is preparing schedules in top 
markets for its Chocolate Cake Roll Mix. The campaign starts 2." 
January for four weeks. Minutes during daytime slots are being 
lined up; frequency depends upon the market. The buyer is Ha 
Davis; the agency is Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., New 
York. 

The Borden Co., Inc., New York, is initiating a campaign in majoi 
markets for its Instant Whip. The schedules start this month, rui 
for eight weeks. Minutes and 20's during both daytime and night 
time segments are being placed; frequency varies from market t< 
market. The buyer is Chips Barrabee; the agency is Lennen i 
Newell, Inc., New York. 

J. A. Folger & Co., Kansas City, is going into 45-50 markets wit 
a campaign for its coffees. Start date is this month, with a 52-wee 
run. Ten- and 20-second announcements are being used; frequencie 
depend upon the market. The buyer is Al Randall; the agency i 
Cunningham & Walsh, Inc., New York. 

Lever Bros. Co., New York, is entering markets throughout th 
country for its Surf detergent. The 13-week campaign starts thi 
month. Minutes and 20's during daytime segments are being sche< 
uled, with frequencies varying from market to market. The buyer i 
Hal Davis; the agency is Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc 
New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

Greyhound Corp., Chicago, is going into various markets througl 
out the country to promote its bus lines. Schedules this month an'; 
next vary in length. Minutes during daytime periods are bein 
slotted; frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is Joa 
Rutman; the agency is Grey Advertising Agency, New York. 

Standard Brands, Inc., New York, is kicking off a campaign i ■ 
major markets for its Blue Bonnett Margarine. The four-week schet 
ules start this month. Minutes during daytime periods are beirj 
used; frequencies vary from market to market. The buyer is L 
Soglio; the agency is Ted Bates & Co., New York. 



::i 



General Foods Corp., Jello-0 Div., White Plains, N. Y., is us 
top markets for its Calumet Baking Powder schedules. The car 
paign starts this month for a five-week run; frequencies deper 
upon the market. The buyer is Bill Croke; the agency is Foot 
Cone & Belding, Inc.. New York. 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 19; 1 



stepl 

intt ACTION 

in TOPEKA with 

^ 5000 WATTS 

•^^^J 1440 on your dial 

FIRST 



IN PULSE! 





For the Fifth Straight Time — KJAY Action Radio 
has captured the Pulse of Topeka — Again KJAY 
LEADS in total share-of -audience all day long from 
6 AM to 6 PM! 

(Topeka Metro Pulse, October 1958) 

KJAY offers TOPEKALAND advertisers the BUYER 
ACTION formula. General Manager Ed Schulz can 
give you this formula, or nationally, contact KJAY's 
NEW National Reps — 



Gill - Perna 



NEW YORK, CHICAGO. DETROIT. LOS ANGELES. SAN FRANCISCO 
IN ST. LOUIS: JACK H EATH ERINGTON 







rving 516,486 people in 
' rich Kansas Counties 

' SOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



TOPEKA, Kansas 



5000 WATTS 
1440 on your dial 



71 



ADVERTISERS 



LestoiFs saturation tv technique 
and Nescafe's saturation radio 
techniques were scrutinized, last 
week, at the RTES Seminar 
luncheon. 

"Ike" Eskenasy. v. p. of Adell 
Chemical Co.. speaking for Lestoil, 
predicted that by the end of this year 
its advertising hudget will exceed 
$14 million. 

The basis of Lestoil's campaign: 
1) purchase only daytime and late 
evening hours — no prime time, 2) 
buy all stations in a market and 3 ) 
buy a minimum of 30 spots per week 
on each station for a full year. "It is 
preferable to reach smaller audiences 
with many impressions," said Esken- 
asy. 

Speaking for Nescafe and satu- 
ration radio, Joseph Scheideler, 



executive v.p. at Nescafe's agen- 
cy, Bryan Houston, said: 

'"Saturation radio should be budg- 
eted within an over-all product budg- 
et .. . and not exist as a result of 
money available because of network 
preemption or because some maga- 
zine dollars turned up when you 
missed a closing date." 

Scheideler noted that Nescafe's 
saturation radio campaign will con- 
tinue this year on an expanded major 
market basis. 

Campaigns: 

• Christmas in January and Feb- 
ruary: That's the theme adopted by 
Rainbow Crafts, Inc., Cincinnati, 
makers of "Play-Doh" modeling com- 
pound. The assumption is that toy 
retailers need advertising support 
most after the holidays, so Rainbow 
has purchased spot announcements 
on children's tv shows in 15 major 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 




Modern-day Paul Bunyans: Results of a Homelite-sponsored contest on KVOO, Tulsa, 
show Southwestern farmers (967 entries) prefer chain saws to the traditional woodsman's 
axe. Winner Leonard A. Vance of Skiatook, Okla., receives congratulations from (1 to 
r) Carl Meyerdirk KVOO's farm director; Wallace Kelly, local Homelite dealer; C. R. 
"Red" Ellis, the company's Oklahoma branch manager. Sixty-second commercials tagged 
with contest mention brought response from five states; no other promotion was used 



72 



markets. Schedules call for eight j 
20 spots over a period of eight week- 

• Spreading out: V. La Rosa <\ 
Sons began this month, to set up J 
Florida sales force for its macaroJ 
and Italian Food specialties. Tl 
campaign includes a heavy rack 
schedule. 

• Buster Brown Textiles, Int 
after running test tv spots in ttl 
cities, has decided to increase 1 
schedule via a buy of spot announcj 
ments on a kiddie show — The Rom 
er Room — in nine markets. AgenoJ 
Arndt, Preston, Chapin, Lamb 1 
Keen, Philadelphia. 

• The Seabrook Farms CJ 
launches, this week, a spot tv caj 
paign in the New York metropolis i 
area, via three stations, to introdu 
its new prepared vegetables in tl 

liracle Pack." Agency: SmitJ 
Greenland. 

Thisa 'n' data: Skippy Peani* 
Butter is celebrating its eighth cc 
secutive year of sponsoring ABC TV 
You Asked For It . . . Philip M 
ris, Inc., has signed up four ? 
York Giants football members 




Back home again in Dayton, O., are 
famous McGuire sisters, who appeared 
cently on WLW-D"s Morning Theater v 
show's host, Andy Marten (above). G 
launched career on station seven years 



Closed circuit broadcast to ABC T\ af 
ates told KETV, Omaha leadership sti 
Participating: ABC TV's Ollie Treyz, J 
gene Thomas, station v.p. and gen. tl 




ir sales force during the off-season 
. Donna Reed, star of her own 
>w on ABC TV, was taken on an 
pection tour of Shulton's (the 
>w's sponsor) plant in Clifton. N.J. 

rictly personnel: Donald 

eene, appointed advertising man- 

■r of Ra\co Manufacturing Co. . . . 

ibert Kob, elected a v. p. of B. T. 

bbitt . . . W. H. Schomburg, to 

istant general sales manager of 

na Corp., Toledo . . . Walter 

Fiend, to v.p. in charge of adver- 

ng, Friend Bros., Melrose. Mass. 

I . Harry Carlson, Southwestern 

Bision supervisor and Mare Jung- 

|fu Virginia district manager of 

( nphell Sales Co. 



AGENCIES 



C e of the first bigger mergers 
in the new year has taken place 
h ween Fletcher D. Richards 
a 1 Calkins & Hohlen. 

INew name: Fletcher. Richards, 
Ckins & Holden. with billings at 
a Toximately $35 million. 



New officers: Fletcher Richards 
remains president and chief executive 
officer; Bradley Walker, chairman of 
the board; Paul Smith, vice-chair- 
man; J. Sherwood Smith, chairman 
of the executive committee and Ed- 
mund Johnstone, executive v.p. 

Recently, the Richards agency 
merged with two smaller groups — 
Harris, Harlan Wood, on the Pacific 
Coast and the Tandy Agency, of 
Canada. 

Incidentally, the first account 
awarded to this merged agency is 
Sofskin, Inc., maker of hand cream. 

A sizable chunk of new business 
landed in the John W. Shaw shop 
this week: The Red Heart Dog Food 
portion of John Morrell & Co., bill- 
ing around SI. 5 million — and heavy 
in spot radio. 

This account was snagged from 
Campbell-Mithun, also of Chicago, as 
was Morrell Pride Meats and the Red 
Heart Cat Food which Shaw acquired 
last spring. 

Other agency appointments: How- 
ard Clothes, Inc., to Mogul, Lewin, 



Williams & Savior . . . M. J. Mer- 
kin Paint Co., to G. T. Stanley Co., 
New York . . . Lehn & Fink Carib- 
bean Corp.. for advertising in Mexico 
and Venezuela, to Y&R . . . Napier 
Engines, Inc., to EWR&R . . . Mer- 
cury Records, with billings at $500,- 
000. to John W. Shaw, Chicago . . . 
Robert Hall Clothes from Frank B. 
Sawdon to Arkwright Advertising. 

Another merger: Frank B. Swan- 
don, Inc., New York, has acquired 
the F. B. Stanley Advertising Co. 
Stan Syman becomes executive v.p. 
and Ardien Rodner, v.p. and media 
director. 

New agencies formed : J. H. Alt- 
man & Co., Detroit, formed by 
Jerome H. Altman, formerly presi- 
dent of Altman-Yaffe, Inc. . . . Gum- 
pertz, Bentley & Dolan, Los An- 
geles, formed by Gordon Gumpertz, 
to be president; Phil Bentley, v.p. 
and account service director and For- 
rest Dolan, v.p. and creative director. 
All were formerly account executives 
at the Edward S. Kellogg Co., Los 
Angeles. 




I like it! is reaction of listeners to new music format adopted 
r> nily by WGMS, Washington, D. C. Here Muriel Sutton displays 
BiO letters, 5,000 requests for station's new program guide 



I • >i>> Birthday! Detroit 
I igsters' favorite clown, 
I f, celebrates 8th tv year, 
latulations from Alan 
1 ki«IT. l\ radio director for 
Likoff & Wayburn Agency 



Talking it over are Robert W. 
Sarnoff, (1) chairman of the board 
of NBC and Dr. Harvey E. White, 
prof, of physics and vice chair- 
man of U. of Cal.. who conducts 
the net's Continental Classroom 




It's 10 years on the air for Hreadtime Stories, live children's 
television show emanating from WRGB. Schenectady. Shown at 
anniversary get-together are (1 to r) Frank Freihofer, Jr., presi- 
dent of baking company sponsor, Jim Fisk, the show's storyteller 
and cartoonist, Robert Reid, mgr. marketing, WGY. WRGB, Jack 
Goldman, president Goldman & Walter, ad agency for the sponsor 




data: Samm Sinclair 
Baker, of the executive staff of 
Donahue & Coe, has started writing 
a business-advertising book for Dou- 
bleday & Co. . . . News from over- 
seas: Robert Douglass Stuart, 
marketing consultant, began conduct- 
ing, kst week, the first of a seven- 
week seminar in Berlin on U. S. mar- 
keting techniques . . . Hameroff Ad- 
vertising, Columbus. Ohio, an- 
nounced its incorporation last week 
. . . Winner: Reg Spurr, media buy- 
er at Y&R. copped a trip to Paris as 
first prize in the KBIG. Los Angeles, 
copy-writing contest. 

They were named v.p.'s: Gerald 
Light, from account group head to 
v.p. at McCann-Erickson . . . Horace 
Curtis, to SSC&B as v.p. on the 
American Tobacco Co. account . . . 
Richard Goebel, to v.p. at Comp- 
ton . . . Edward Ritz, v.p. in charge 
of media, Klau-Van Pietersom-Dun- 
lap . . . Daniel Duffin, v.p. in charge 
of client public relations for the East- 
ern division of EWR&R . . . Lester 
Rounds and Ed Spitzer, v.p.'s at 
Kudner . . . Arthur Taylor, v.p. in 
charge of media in the Chicago office 




by more people! 

Nielsen (Spring '58) shows 12.5% 
more TV homes. Refigure your cost 
per thousand! Base it on ratings x 
Nielsen! 

KTBS-TV is seen by more than a 
million people with more than 1.5 
billion dollars to spend in this oil- 
rich four-state market. 
Channel 3 is the only sin- 
gle TV buy that can give 
you full coverage of this 
rich four-state market. 
Ask your Petry man for details 





E. Newton Wray. Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



of Reach, McClinton & Pershall . . . 
Darrell Roberts, administrative v.p. 
of MacManus, John & Adams . . . Hal 
Dickens, v.p. in charge of merchan- 
dising. Edward H. Weiss & Co., Chi- 
cago . . . William Finkle, v.p. at 
Ritter. Sanford, Price & Chalek, New 
York. 



FILM 



As the new year got under way, 
film companies last week un- 
derwent a number of forward- 
looking expansions and reor- 
ganizations to face some of the 
problems of the coming months. 
Two of these moves were: 

• ITC named three division man- 
agers to its syndication sales staff: 
Lee Cannon in the midwest, Alton 
Whitehouse in the southeast and Len 
Warager in the northeast, all report- 
ing to general syndication sales chief 
Hardie Frieberg. ITC also put on 
two additional members of its New 
York staff, Jack Kelley and George 
Stanford. 

• NTA named David Melamed to 
be v.p. in charge of business affairs. 

Programing: Screen Gems has ac- 
quired tv rights to properties of 
James Thurber to produce The Secret 
Life of James Thurber. Arthur 
O'Connell with a female lead to be 
announced . . . producer W. Lee 
Wilder left Hollywood last week to 
scout locations for filming The Ad- 
ventures of Marco Polo to be distrib- 
uted by Interstate TV . . . Partly as 
a result of a survey that there are 
35 million bridge players in the U.S., 
Walter Schwimmer will produce 
Championship Bridge, which like 
Schwimmer's former programs of 
other recreations, will involve com- 
petition of two teams plus substan- 
tial prizes for the winners . . . Also 
developing in Chicago were produc- 
er Max Cooper's plans to tape base- 
ball in Havana during the winter 
and syndicate it in the U. S.; Cooper 
points out that there is no other base- 
ball in U. S. during the winter and 
that many U. S. major league names 
are involved with Havana teams. 
Winter Tv Baseball will be a nine- 
inning game edited down to one hour. 

Transfer news: Shareholders of 
National Theaters voted in favor of 



a proposal to acquire a controlling' 1 

interest in National Telefilm As I 

I 
sociates. 

Miscellany: Michael M. Siller | 
man, president of Gross-Krasne-Si) 
lerman, will speak before the Holly 
wood Ad Club on 19 January on hoi 
to merchandise tv programs . . . Zi 
has prepared a special kit for secon. 
year sponsors of Sea Hunt . . . Pai 
ticipants in ceremonies to mark th 
opening of a San Francisco office el 
Bandelier Films included Mayo 
George Christopher of San Francisc I 
and City Commissioner Maurice Sar 
chez of Albuquerque, N. M. . . . Hei 
man Edel has been appointed execi 
tive v.p. of Music Makers, Inc. 

Sales: New regional buys on Ziv j 
Cisco Kid include Dan-Dee market | 
Eddy Bakeries division of Gener; 
Baking, Piggley Wiggly superma 
kets, and Interstate Baking . . . All 
mour Meats and P. Ballantine to & 
sponsor Bold Venture on WRCV-T\ 
Philadelphia . . . UAA sold Warm I 
Brothers features to 12 stations. Po| 
eye cartoons to 6 stations and mac I 
other sales in the first week of 195* 



NETWORKS 



Like CBS TV, NBC TV has pi 
an end to the "must-buy"" coi 
cept. 

The old system which required tl 
purchase of all 57 basic stations h; 
been replaced by this policy: 

Orders will be acceptable if tl 
lineup includes stations totalling 
least $95,000 in nighttime hour 
rates, or stations with $42,500 
hourly rates for Class C time. 

The above amounts are, respecth 
ly, 74.6/4 of the present Class A ra 
and 66.8% of the present C rate fi 
the full NBC TV network of 2t 
stations. 

Programing notes: P. Lorillar 
for its Old Gold Straights, renew 
Rough Riders, via ABC TV, for 
additional 26 weeks . . . Greyhoui 
Corp. (Grey Advertising) will spo 
sor two Jack Benny specials ill 
spring, via CBS TV . . . Continent 
Classroom, NBC TV's early a.i 
college credit course, will begin i 
second tv semester next month, bast 
on atomic physics. 



74 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195 



Station resignation: WTAG, 
[Worcester, Mass., from its affilia- 
ion with CBS Radio. 

\\ TAG, in a letter to the network. 

haid : "We consider the barter plan 
miliary to our concepts of responsi- 
\v broadcasting. We feel we have 
o right to trade away control of the 

Nation's policies, programs, or prices. 

We also have no desire to do so." 

Lietwork affiliations: To ABC Ra- 

lio, KOME, Tulsa ... To the Key- 
tone Broadcasting System: 

,;BVR, Soda Springs. Idaho; WLDS. 
Jacksonville, 111.; WHLT, Hunting- 
m. Ind.; WDOE, Dunkirk, N. Y.; 
i'LSB, Copperhill. Tenn.; KBCS. 
Irand Prairie, Tex.; and KRSC. 
Uhello. Wash. 

m the personnel front: Albert 
iapstaff, appointed director of NBC 
adio network programs, succeeding 
erry Danzig, who v.p., participat- 
lg programs, NBC TV . . . John 
ynch, to assistant director of pub- 
ic affairs, CBS News . . . James 
tabile, to head talent and program 
mtract administration for NBC . . . 
ohn Downey, to the program de- 
art ment of the CBS TV stations. 



RADIO STATIONS 



» estinghouse Broadcasting Co.'s 
•on McGannon last week warned 
!»me 700 sales executives against 
'tting the modern complexities 
f sales planning allow them to 
ecome "desk-bound, or confer- 
nce happy." 

, The occasion was a Sales Execu- 
tes luncheon of the New England 
ales Management Conference in 
oston. 

McGannon urged his listeners to 
•ep their eyes more on the sales 
met ion, adding "we are involved in 
> much planning that we are likely 

forget the doing." 

CRB, Boston, has bowed to the 
AB radio code and discontinued its 
lird liquor advertising. 
I The station was in the middle of a 
>-week contract with the distributors 
Nuyens Vodka. 

leas at work: 

I • Trying to break the record: 
iter Tripp, d.j. on WMGM, New 





TAILOR MADE 
FOR NATIONAL 
TELEVISION 
ADVERTISERS! 



CKLW-TV is the one Detroit Area television station 
"ready made" for the national Spot Advertiser who cannot be 
troubled by network clearances and who needs prime time 
for his message. This, coupled with more impressions, more total 
homes, more rating points for the advertiser's dollar 
makes channel 9 the most efficient and economical 
buy in the nation's fifth market. 




GUARDIAN BLDG. DETROIT 26, MICH. 

I. t. Comp«oi>, Rrtlid»nl 

Young Television Corp., National iepreitnioii>e 



ONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



to 



Problem Solved 
by a Timebuyer 




Joe's problem was spot cost- 
per-thousand. Too high, said 
the client. 




Competitive markets made 
saturation tough, ratings low. 




Take a look, said Blair TV 
Associates, at the WCTV 
market. He looked and 
pondered. 




Joe found 122,080 homes, 
largely unduplicated, (NCS 
#3) 




. . . and married the client's 
daughter and lived wealthily 
ever after. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 



for North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



York, begins his stay-awake mara- 
thon this week, for the March of 
Dimes campaign. He will broadcast 
from a glass-enclosed building on 
Times Square, and attempt to break 
the stay-awake record of seven days, 
19 hours. While designed to raise 
funds, this marathon will be observed 
by scientists studying "Sleep Dep- 
rivation" in connection with missile 
travel. 

• KXOK, St. Louis, held a few 
contests this month: A top 30 letter 
writing contest, where listeners were 
to make up a letter using only the 
titles of the top 30 tunes; a best 
snowman contest, and one for the 
best drawing of "Alvin," star of "The 
Chipmunk Song." 

• Another rescuer for Tom Dooley : 
KOMA, Oklahoma City, concluded 
its recent human interest campaign 
by petitioning for, and receiving a 
reprieve for Dooley from the state of 
Oklahoma — with the signatures of 
thousands of listeners. 

• KGW, Portland, is promoting 
its new "sound" and personalities via 
on-the-air giveaways amounting to 
$1,000 per day. Theme of promo- 
tion: "Sound 62, 4th Dimension 
Radio." 

• They're not taking any chances: 
WPEN, Philadelphia, has set up a 
pre-monitor system for its two-way 
phone conversation between the lis- 
teners and station personalities. The 
system delays transmission over the 
air by seven seconds, so that unwant- 
ed remarks could be deleted. 

• On the news beat front: When 
K-NUZ, Houston, received news of 
Russia's launching a satellite, it 
placed a transatlantic phone call to 
Moscow radio news, contacted a news 
man there, and taped an interview — 
then put it on the air, and gave the 
story to UPI. 

• Another transatlantic call: 
WCKR, Miami, for a commercial' 
for the Florida State Theatres, called 
the British picture producer of "A 
Night To Remember," and discussed 
the film with him, thus adding to the 
peak crowds that went to see the 
movie. 

Station staffers: VanBuren De 
Vries, v.p. of the Transcontinental 
Tv Corp., named general manager of 
WGR, Buffalo . . . Boone Nevin, to 
general manager of WHBQ, Mem- 
phis . . . Mort Silverman, general 
manager of WJBO & WBRL-FM, 



76 



Baton Rouge . . . Harold Waddell, 
named general manager of WKBZ, 
Muskegon, Mich. . . . Joseph Knose, 
to local sales manager for WKJG, Ft. 
Wayne . . . Edward Neibling, to 
local sales manager and Bud Makin- 
ster, to the news staff at KTUL, 
Tulsa . . . George Cromwell, pro- 
gram director, KFBI, Wichita. 



TV STATIONS 



WTVT, Tampa, claims that two 
of its staff newsmen-cameramen 
were the first — and that includes 
networks — to get into Cuba fol- 
lowing Batista's overthrow. 

Also, that these newsmen, Earl 
Wells and Marion Scott, were the first 
to get exclusive interviews with Fidel 
Castro and provisional president 
Manuel Urritia Lleo. 

They got in by flying behind a 
rebel officer's plane out of Key West. 

Ideas at work : 

• In search of identification: 
WTIC-TV, Hartford, is offering a< 
Rambler station wagon and $1,000 in 
cash prizes for its "Station Identifica- 
tion" contest. The idea: viewers are 
asked to submit an identification in- 1 
corporating call letters, channel num- 
ber, CBS TV affiliation, station loca- 
tion, a symbol of the station's cover- 
age area and a slogan — all adaptable- 
for use as a station identification! 
slide. 

• It's a myth: KETV, Omaha, is 
asking viewers to find a mythicalj 
name for a mythical monster tenta-i 
tively dubbed "Father of the Thing." 
This is part of a promotion for the 
station's showing of the movie, "The! 
Thing." The winner will be brought 
to the station to meet the monster. I 

• WICU-TV, Erie, Pa., had a girl 
dressed in a football outfit, parade 
the city streets to call attention to its 
NBC Football line-up. 

• WFBM-TV, Indianapolis, orig 
inated what it calls, the first coverage 
in the history of the opening of In- 
diana's General Assembly. Both the 
radio and tv outlets fed the coverage 
to 10 other Indiana radio station* 
and four tv stations. 

Call letters change: for Triangle's 
station in the Lebanon- York-Harris^ 
burg area, from WLBR-TV tcj 
WLYH-TV. 

{Please turn to page 78) 

SPONSOR • 17 JANUARY 1959 



Hli 




VIDEOTAPE 



DYNAMIC 

NEW DIMENSION 

IN TV ADVERTISING 



However you measure it — quality, convenience or 
economy — tape adds new dimensions to television 
advertising, and for at least 9 good reasons: 

TAPE OFFERS THE ADVANTAGES OF LIVE TV 

• Use of popular local personalities 

• Conveys a sense of immediacy 

• Permits last minute copy changes 



PLUS THE ADVANTAGES OF FILM 

• Perfect performance every time 

• Accuracy of the sponsor's message 

• Identical commercials in all markets 

AND THE ADVANTAGES ONLY TAPE CAN OFFER 

• Immediate viewing of the recording 

• Erasability and re-usability 

• Change audio without affecting video 




REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Offices and representatives in principal 

cities throughout the world 



Proudly displayed by progressive 
stations in major markets everywhere 

*TM AMPEX CORP, 



I 



^\ ft- 
VIDEOTAPE 



AMPEX 



CORPORATION 



professional 
products division 



'OISSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



WRAP-UP 

[Cont'd from page 76 I 

Thisa 'n' data: WIS-TV, Colum- 
bia. S. C. has the head of the mar- 
keting department at the I niversity 
of S. C. directing a survey of the 
area, to be sent to advertisers and 
their agencies . . . KTTV, Los An- 
geles, says it was the tv sweepstakes 
winner in the Tournament of Roses 
Parade New Year's Day. capturing a 
first in the ratings race. 



On the personnel front: D. A. 
Noel, named general manager of 
WHBQ-TV, Memphis . . . Claud 
O'Shields, to general manager of 
WECT, Wilmington. N. C Rich- 
ard Foerster, to sales manager of 
WISN-TV, Milwaukee . . . Alvin 
Flanagan, elected v.p. and general 
manager of KCOP Tv Corp., Los An- 
geles . . . George Freeman, to news 
director of WNBF-AM-FM & TV, 
Binghamton, N. Y. . . . Paul Mills 
has resigned as Midwest tv sales man- 
ager in Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Co.'s Chicago office. ^ 



initial order of 2,750 cases from one 
of the largest chains, hitherto a non- 
Marv Ellen's distributor. ^ 



SPOT TV STAR 

[Cont'd from page 33) 

Soon Burrud knew some facts he 
might brush up against: the usual 
practice in the jam and jelly business 
is an advertising allowance to stores 
for a mention in their advertising. 
Mary Ellen's was offering a 52-week 
campaign instead with a case allow- 
ance for point-of-sale displays. 

Fortunately, Los Angeles was the 
practice territory. That was where a 
26-week tv test I with a local travel 
adventure package, Wonders of the 
World) had saved Mary Ellen's dis- 
tribution and made good friends of 
the very chains that were threatening 
to drop the brand. 

But during the test all deals, coop- 
erative advertising, in-store promo- 
tions were eliminated so that all sales 
would reflect tv advertising alone. 

Now it was an all-out push for in- 
store support. 

The average number of calls was 
four to five a day. But Whitehead re- 
ports that in Salt Lake six out of 10 
new accounts were opened in one day 
as a result of the four-way pitch. 

Elsewhere, the biggest coup was an 



CHAMPALE 

[Cont'd from page 36) 

is limited to brewery products," 
Hertzberg says. "We saw a golden 
opportunity for Champale to exert its 
glamour appeal. So copy was direct- 
ed to the tavern crowd: 'the perfect 
drink for your evening out'. Our 
heaviest merchandising in these states 
was to taverns." 

Economy was the keynote in New 
York City at the start. At first, the 
schedule was confined to Negro sta- 
tions. In 1955, a music and news 
station was added with a conviviality 
and party aspect featured. Feelers to 
the Spanish market went out with a 
schedule on a Spanish-language sta- 
tion. It is now part of the over-all 
schedule. Late last year, WQXR was 
added to the list. Even the classical 
music listener, it was reasoned, could 
be reached with an economy story if 
this becomes one of the many "spe- 
cial'" benefits of the product. 

Standard to all copy is the empha- 
sis on stemmed glasses, the economy 
of "four generous servings" and, 
more and more, the young married 
market. No single copy slant is ever 
pushed too far, stresses account super- 
visor Sanford L. Hirschberg, Don- 
er and Peck executive v.p. He cites 
the "party corner" as one trap to be 
avoided in order to keep the appeal 
as broad as possible to the specific 
targets at which Champale aims. 

A jingle was devised as a linking 
device in 1956 by Peck (which 
merged with W. B. Doner and Co. 
in September, '58). The 20-second 
jingle is used as standard intro for a 
60-second spot, the favored length. 

Rapid change of pace will also sug- 
gest new and varied uses. The ac- 
count's creative director Mike Reese 
cites a recent example: Christmas 
copy was pulled on all stations on 25 
December and a single piece of "toast- 
the-New Year" copy substituted in 
all markets for five days (26-31 De- 
cember ) . 

"Ratings become particularly sig- 
nificant when your buys are pin- 
pointed to this extent," says Hirsch- 
berg. "Since we know what market 
we're after, ratings within specific 



groups become more meaningful. We 
can shift schedules on a station itself 
to take advantage of better ratings." 

Another reason for shifting sched- 
ules on a station, according to Cham- 
pale admen, is to reach different in- 
dividuals in the same audience group. 
"You can exhaust a nighttime audi- 
ence, on a specialized station particu- 
larly," notes Champale's Benjamin 
Hertzberg. "when virtually the same 
tastes are being overlooked in the 
afternoon. Capturing a new group in 
the same audience can only be ac- 
complished in a broadcast medium." 

"Saturation" is accomplished in an 
unusual way when markets are ad- 
jacent and tastes are similar. A.e. 
David A. Neuman points to a recent 
Baltimore-Washington campaign. A 
Negro-appeal station in Washington, 
a Negro-appeal and music-and-news 
station in Baltimore were bought with 
schedules that dovetailed. Result of 
a six-months test was a 20% distribu- 
tion increase in the area. 

"We never advertise for less than 
six months in a market," says Hertz- 
berg. "We may shift the schedules 
to cut costs, increase circulation or 
find new members in the same audi- 
ence. But we rarely pull advertising 
till it's had a chance to take hole 
and show a distribution gain." 

Following this pattern, Champale 
has expanded its distribution from 31 
to 40 states, its distributors from 300 
to 400 in four years. 

Because the product "concept" is 
so important, a brewery representa- 
tive works in a new territory from 
the beginning, educating the distribu- 
tor and the sales force. 

Hertzberg was no stranger to broad- 
cast advertising when he launched 
Champale in the medium in 195$, 
Metropolis Brewery, founded in 1933 
by his father, Louis Hertzberg, also 
produces Regent Beer which uses ra- 
dio and tv in Norfolk, Va. 

The Hertzbergs, including Benja- 
min's brother Abraham, also own Na- 
tional Brewery, Ltd. in Nathanya, Is- 
rael and Old Dutch Brewery, South 
Africa, Ltd. in Johannesburg. 

Size of the Hertzberg's overseas op- 
eration can be roughly deduced from 
the fact that in 1954, 25,000 cases ol 
Abir brand beer were brought fror 
Israel fur -ale through Champale's 
distributors throughout the U.S. This 
is reportedly the largest single ship! 
ment of imported beer ever broughj 
into this country. 



78 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 195? 



PERSONALITY 
PROGRAMMING 

KHJ-TV with its outstanding new 
roster of live personalities is chang- 
ing the television buying and view- 
ing habits of Southern California. 

Such nationally known names as 
Oscar Levant, Don Sherwood and 
John J. Anthony plus such popular 
Los Angeles names as John Willis, 
Walker Edmiston and "Engineer 
Bill" Stulla are selling more prod- 



uct for more advertisers than ever 



before. Why? Because these per- 
sonalities are live and local... 



Southern Californians know them 



and respond to their recommenda- 
tions in a way that makes cash reg- 
isters ring as never before. 

When buying Los Angeles televi- 
sion, take advantage of the phe- 
nomenal selling "plus" that comes 
with Personality Programming . . . 
on the Los Angeles station with 
more live television personalities 
than any other. 

KHJ^TV 

LOS ANGELES 



Represented by H-R Television, Inc. 






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SPONSOR ASKS 

{Cont'd from page 45) 

daily with a circulation of approxi- 
mately 500,000. Now compare what 
the cost of a full page will buy and 
what the same money will buy on 13. 
The page could cost approximately 
$3500 and would reach (according to 
Starch I about 40'^ of the paper's 
1,000,000 readers or 400,000 people. 

Thirty-five hundred dollars would 
buy roughly 25 one-minute spots on 
WNTA-TV and, with an average rat- 
ing of just 3.0, we reach 135,000 
homes per spot for a total of 3,375,- 
000 homes. This is 17 times more 
reach than the newspaper gives. 

To magnify the comparison fur- 
ther, S3,500 would buy 140 I.D.'s on 
our R.O.S. Plan (just to make a 
point, not that we'd sell that many to 
one advertiser) giving the advertiser 
a staggering total of 38,000,000 im- 
pressions. Putting it another way, a 
dollar buys 10,800 people on our tv 
station whereas a dollar buys a total 
of 114 people in the newspaper. Com- 
parison? Hah! There just ain't any. 

Harry Mooradian, commercial man- 
ager, KGBT & KGBT-TV, Harlingen, Texas 

The best way I can think of to sell 
against newspapers is to completely 
ignore them and pitch all of your 
own media advantages, giving strong 
points where only television can qual- 
ify, or in the case of radio, where 
only radio can qualify. 

Radio has many advantages over 
newspapers, such as: a personally 
delivered message which is alive; it 
has inflection, action, sound and au- 
thoritativeness when done by that 
favorite local personality. Only the 
sponsor's message can be heard at 
any one time. Changes can be made 
as easily as the weather and where 
or how else can an on-the-spot broad- 



Tv cost-per- 
1,000 low 
compared to 
newspaper 



cast be done as easily and as uncom- 
plicated as with radio! 

Television has many advantages 
over newspaper, especially in my par- 
ticular area, the Rio Grande Valley 





of Texas. It has over twice the num- 
ber of tv sets as the total combined 
circulation of all three daily papers. 
Television is also more versatile, time- 
ly, and reaches more people. 

In summary, television and radio 
cost-per-1,000 is so low, compared 
with any other media in the Rio 
Grande Valley, that it makes selling 
against newspapers purely economic 
— we give more for less! 

William L. Putnam, pres. and general 

mgr., Springfield Television Bdcstg. Co. 

[WW LP, Springfield, WRLP, Greenfield, 

WWOR-TV, Worcester, Mass.) 



We think 
we sell better, 
our adver- 
tisers agree 



Not having the good fortune to op- 
erate in a city in which the newspa- 
pers and the tv stations get along 
amicably, we sell hard and fast 
against our local press and, believe 
me, its a cinch. 

All of the newspapers in the Con- 
necticut Valley, our viewing area, are 
linked in common ownership with 
our local competition and consequent- 
ly the use of either my name, the 
WWLP call letters or absolutely any- 
thing to do with the station from a 
promotion or personality standpoint 
is strictly verboten . . . and I mean 
verboten. 

The local newspaper monopoly has 
helped rather than hindered us be- 
cause of the ridiculous nature of 
their editorial policies and their ef- 
forts to harm our operation during 
its early stages. Due to our continu- 
ing campaign to provide top live pro- 
grams concerning the growth of the 
community and the importance of the 
various local industries that make our 
economy workable, the businessmen 
and the viewing audience in our area 
know that they will get accurate and \ 
unbiased news, expert weather fore- 
casts, friendly interviews of interest 
to the community, editorials that the 
community have a voice in, etc. 

We feel that we sell better, pro- 
gram better, and get to the people 
better than any other medium in the 
Connecticut River Valley. Our adver- 
tisers think so, too. 



80 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



To sell Indiana, 

you need both 

the 2nd and 3rd 

ranking markets. 



YOU NEED TWO TO REALLY GO 

in Indiana! 




Advertisers anxious to gather speed in Indiana, ride double 
into this lively sales place. They sweep across two major 
markets — Fort Wayne and South Bend - Elkhart — on one 
combination fare which saves 10%. They thus "cut the ice" 
in a rich interurbia of 340,000 TV homes — bigger than T. A.'s 
43rd market*. Over 1,688,000 people — more than Arizona, 
Colorado or Nebraska. Effective Buying Income, nearly $3 
billion — and it's yours with just one budget-saving buy! 

*Sources: Television Age, May 19, 1958; Sales Management 
Survey of Buying Power, May 1958. 



call your 



man now 



»-fi 





TO7 



SOUTH BEND 



ELKHART 




TO7 M 



FORT WA Y NE 




KOSI put the 
DARNDEST SOCK 
in Denver Radio 




KOSI's well-rounded sound appeals to every 
member of the -family . . . keeps KOSI's huge 
adult listening audience on a continuous buying 
spree in Denver. No double spotting assures 
maximum impact. 

Take advantage of the 10% combination dis- 
count when you buy both KOBY and KOSI. 

5000 Watts 
Denver is 

KOSI-land! 

See Your Petry Man 

WGVM-Greenville, Miss. 
KOBY in San Francisco 

Mid -America Broadcasting Co. 




1 


over 

two million 

Italians 

agree 

it's 

WOV 

IN N.Y.C. & VICINITY 

> J 


% 

Q 


Ik J 
■ ^°/\~ — 

Lai 


m 
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WOV 

▼ V Vy V NEW YORK -ROME 



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accounts. Prior 
where he served 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Ceorge Chatfield, formerly executive v.p. 
of William Esty Co., has joined Benton & 
Bowles as senior v.p. and member of the 
board of directors and plans board, accord- 
ing to an announcement by B&B president. 
Robert Lusk. A veteran of 19 years (1928- 
47) with Lever Bros., Chatfield had been 
with Esty since 1952, where he supervised 
the Colgate, Sun Oil, Chesebrough Ponds 
to that he was associated with Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
as v.p. and plans board member from 1947 to 1950. 




Lloyd B. Taft has been named general 
manager of WBRC, Birmingham, Ala. He 
was formerly in management and sales at 
WTVN, Columbus. 0. Both stations are 
owned by Radio Cincinnati. Taft, son of 
the late Sen. Robert Taft, and grandson of 
the late president William Howard Taft, is 
a graduate of Taft School and Yale Uni- 
versity. Prior to joining Radio Cincinnati, 
he was executive v.p. of the Cincinnati Times-Star. In his new posi- 
tion, Taft succeeds R. Bevington, who moves to WKRC, Cincinnati. 

S. B. Tremble has been appointed station 
manager of KCM0-TV, Kansas City. He 
has been with the station since 1946, start- 
ing there as program director for KCM0 
radio. When Channel 5 went on the air in 
1953, Tremble was named program direc- 
tor of the tv station. In March, 1954, he 
was promoted to commercial manager. Also 
appointed, was Richard W. Evans. He 
becomes station manager of KCM0. KCM0-AM, TV & FM and 
Muzak, are affiliated with the Meredith Publishing Co., Des Moines. 

Edward J. Hennessy has been appointed 
gen. sales manager of WAVY-TV, Norfolk- 
Portsmouth. His radio/tv career began 14 
years ago, as sports announcer, for WRBL, 
Columbus, Ga. After three years, he moved 
to WGBA, Columbus as radio sales man- 
ager. Hennessy's first tv experience was as 
gen. sales manager of WTVM, Columbus. 
In 1954, he went to West Palm Beach, 
where he helped put WEAT-TV on the air. 
sales manager, and most recently, general manager of that station. 





He later became gen. 



82 



SPONSOR 



17 JANUARY 1959 



TAMPA - 

ST. PETERSBURG 




, it 



:-l-l„ 



...market on the move! 



L" 



ft »" 



^> 




1 



-V 






?1 




Station on the move . . . 



llfflfV 



Under the $22,000,000 Sunshine Skyway pass huge tankers 
that supply fuel oil to TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG industrial 
locations ... as industry, in turn, routes truck fleets of 
products across the Skyway — out of the MARKET ON THE 
MOVE to points throughout Florida and the nation 

The fabulous Sunshine Skyway . . . over 15 miles of 
bridge and causeway connecting the Tampa Bay area with 
South Florida . . . signifies another giant step forward in 
the MARKET ON THE MOVE —TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG. 

And in the heart of this vibrant, active market is the 
station on the move — WTVT — first in total share of audi- 
ence* with 30 of the top 50 programs.* WTVT, with highest- 
rated CBS and local shows, blankets and penetrates the 
MARKET ON THE MOVE . . . TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG. 

*fotest ARB 



TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 



The WKY Television System/lnc. 



WKY-TV 

Oklahoma City 



WKY- RADIO 

Oklahoma City 



WSFA-TV 

Montgomery 




SPONSOR 



The Role of the Station Representative 

Agency men and advertising managers, especially those 
who are not directly concerned with time buying, will do well 
to re-read and ponder the article in last week's sponsor titled 
"How stations rate 'rep' services." 

Outside of agency media departments, too little is known 
in the advertising world of the many types of services per- 
formed by the national representatives of radio and tv stations. 

These services (a recent sponsor survey showed no less 
than 42 of them, in addition to straight selling) frequently 
enable a representative to make valuable contributions to the 
advertising and marketing of almost any type of product. 

Because, today, he works so closely with his station clients, 
the station representative has a far more detailed and thor- 
ough knowledge of markets and regional conditions than he 
ever had in years past. 

To account men, marketing men, and advertising managers, 
as well as to the time buyers and media directors with whom 
he is in more constant contact, he can be a source of much 
valuable help. 

One penalty of leadership 

This past week we talked with the tv networks about the re- 
actions of drug advertisers to the new NAB code ban on por- 
traying doctors in tv commercials. 

According to network officials, the principal complaint by 
these advertisers was that tv had set up a code that was 
"stricter than that of magazines or newspapers." 

This is undoubtedly true. Despite the many complaints 
about tv commercials, the fact is that the industry's standards 
are higher than those of 95% of all the print media. 

We believe that this difference in standards is entirely 
right, and entirely justified. It is not merely a penalty of 
leadership, but a frank admission that tv's power is far more 
personal and immediate than that of the printed page. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A recognition by the 
tv industry that, as America's No. 1 national 
medium, it must now assume the burden for ad- 
vertising statesmanship, that was once held by 
the newspapers and later by the magazines. 



84 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Bedlam: A subscription to sponsor I 
from an adman came in carefully 
hi In I out with name, agency and ad- J 
dress. Only discordant note was what | 
the adman had written on the line i 
designating his department: "Psycho 
Ward." 

Pilgrims' Progress: H-R Reps' Frank 
Pellegrin and family made a "pil- 
grimage" to Ireland, highlights of 
which his children reported diary- 
style in a 12-page printed brochure. 
Among the more illuminating pas- 
sages was this one on Blarney Castle 
by 11-year-old Danny Pellegrin: "We 
have explored Blanary Castle which 
is a mess of passages." 

Too much: WKY, Oklahoma City, 
inaugurates a new daily series, Serv- 
ice for Salesmen. According to a 
WKY release, "This public service 
feature will permit wives of Travel- 
ing Salesmen to reach their husbands 
with emergency messages." Sounds 
more like a disservice to us. 

Tv freeze: A recent letter from an 
ad agency media department to 
sponsor Reader's Service requested 
the total population, average number 
of persons per tv home, and estimated 
number of tv sets for Greenland. No 
doubt trying to figure Cost-per -Igloo. 

Delayed action: Card received at 
Christmas by an agencyman from a 
station — "It isn't everyone who can 
enjoy Christmas Day twice during 
the same season, but this year yoi 
can. Because of its very special fea- 
tures, the Gift which we selected for 
you is still in the process of being 
manufactured . . ." Do your Christ- 
mas shopping earlier. 

Blend: A tv news program endei 
with these words, "The dogs brok 
away and raced crazily through a 
field of tobacco." Came the commer 
cial: "Does your cigarette taste dif- 
ferent lately?" — Charles V. Mathis 

Erudite: In promoting its animate 
commercials service, Gene Deitch As- 
sociates, New York, has taken tc 
parodies on a print ad campaign — 
"Great Ideas of the Western World.' 
Sample thought: "People are prett) 
much the same the world over; yoi 
can sell them all corn flakes." 



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Pr0 ve why you'd use KMBC-KJRM ^J$™X%£ 

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DON DAVIS, President 
JOHN SCHILLING, Executive V 
GEORGE HIGGINS, Vice Pres. i 
MORI GREINER, Manager of Te 



and in Radio, it's KMBC ^ Kansas City— KFRM^ the State of Kansas 






24 JANUARY 1959 
20< a copy • $3 ■ ymmr 






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PONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAG 





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December ARB 10 PM - MIDNIGHT 



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ABC-TV 



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MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL 



$500 MILLION 
PLAN FOR 
SPOT RADIO 

sponsor outlines a 
new over-all plan to 
build spot radio vol- 
ume, FIRST OF A SERIES 

Page 31 

Why these three 
companies hitch 
couponing to tv 

Page 36 

K&E's Bud Sherak 
wants the figures 

on markets reache 

Page 38 

SPONSOR'S semi- 
annual index- 
second half, 1958 

Page 43 



DIGEST ON PAGE 







REACH 

MAKES THE DIFFERENCE 

Take a full-court view of Omaha tele- 
vision for example. Here, the Metro 
Area Rating gives only part of the 
score. 

A. C. Nielsen and Co., however, com- 
piled total audience in their first Oma- 
ha Nielsen Station Index in November. 
Nielsen found KMTV has plenty of 

reach; EN0U6H jq DELIVER MORE 
TELEVISION HOMES IN MORE 
QUARTER HOURS THAN ANY OTHER 
OMAHA STATION! 

This is no surprise. NCS^:3 had 
shown that KMTV has more total set 
circulation weekly, daily, day and night 
than any other Omaha station! 
Wise advertisers get the highest scores 
and the lowest cost-per-thousand when 
they buy KMTV. 



OMAHA CHANNEL THREE 




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ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 
N AT I O N A L 

and REGIONAL 
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REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY BOLLING CO LOS ANGELES - SAN FRANCISCO - BOSTON - NEW YORK - CHICAGO • DALLAS 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 






c / ol. 13, No. 4 • 24 January 1959 

S PON SOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



SPONSOR'S $500 million spot radio plan 

31 I" this issue, sponsor begins a series of weekly articles outlining a 
new. over-all plan to build spot radio volume to $500 million by 1963 



Clip a coupon off a tv screen? 

36 They said it couldn't be done — and it can't; but here's how some enter- 
esting campaigns used tv to support couponing in a number of ways 

Parti-Day test sales hit new peak 

38 After slow last half of Dec, Parti-Day shows largest 15-day period since 
Green Bay tv test began. Milwaukee broker reports 1595, cases shipped 

What's needed in broadcast research? 

38 Bud Sherak, K&E research chief, lists three problem areas. Among 
them: percent of a product's market represented by show's audience 

Alcoa solves marketing problems with radio 

40 Complex radio buys are designed to promote products of Alcoa customers 
with dealer tie-ins; network, regional and spot pattern will be used 

Radar now spicing tv weather programs 

42 More stations reported installing radar equipment so viewers can "see 
weather in the making." Radar interpretation brings personnel problem 

SPONSOR— the second half of 1958 

43 The semi-annual index of personalities, features, case histories broken 
down in alphabetical categories for easy reading — and easy reference 



sponsor asks: What are the latest techniques in tv 
film? 

56 As advertisers' requirements become more demanding, film men report 
the latest production methods being used to secure viewer attention 



FEATURES 

66 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

70 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
70 Picture Wrap-Up 
21 Sponsor Backstage 
68 Sponsor Hears 



13 Sponsor-Scope 
84 Sponsor Speaks 
58 Spot Buys 
84 Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 
82 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
65 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Harold Hazelton 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 
Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 
Vikki Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
Dorris Bowers, Administrative Mgr.; George 
Becker; Laura Datre; Priscilla Hoffman; 
Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
1 49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



FARM LAD MAKES HAY WHILE SUN SHINES 
... in the Land of Milk and Honey! 



5K 



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Our Wisconsin farm families are distinguishable today only by 
added incomes! This is truly the bountiful Land of Milk and M 
Thousands of big dairy farms . . . scores of clean small cities 
400,000 TV families enjoying CBS-ch. 2 television. 
We'll do a hay-maker of a job for you! 







Haydn R. Evans, Gen. Mgr.Rep. Weed Television 




SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



TUei wm k FWa 



There's WWtJ^L 1* in Jacksonville, where the lookout 
on the beaches isn't even as exciting as the business 

outlook. Printers' Ink sums it up: "An economically 
balanced community, its trends point to one direction 

only and that's up." Our closest competition in this 
booming regional center reaches less than half the 
66 counties covered by WJXT in South Georgia as well 
as Northeast Florida. Even inside Jacksonville itself, 
WJXT earns a thundering lead of 69% mornings, 
90% afternoons and 71% at night! In terms of 
TV sets: 110,000 more! In terms of weekly audience: 
l l A times more! In terms of top shows: 

33 out of 40 (and all 10 of the top local shows). 

In any terms, there's more, much more to . . . 




WJXT© 



JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 



An affiliate of the CBS Television Network 
Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 

Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division: 

WJXT Channel 4, Jacksonville, Florida WTOP Radio Washington, D. C. WTOP-TV Channel 9, Washington, D. 



I 







Were No. 1 in 
Jacksonville 

"but that's not 
enough!" says 




Robert R. Feagin 
General Manager 

WPDQ 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



"For over two years the two major rating 
services have found WPDQ Jacksonville's 
top station. This is gratifying to us — but 
we know agency Time Buyers and Adver- 
tisers want to know more than the rating 
story before placing a schedule in Jack- 
sonville. To get results a station must 
have listeners, true — enough to get good 
ratings -but those listeners must be alert, 
loyal, and active in the community. Alert 
to catch your commercial message — loyal 
enough to accept the station's implied 
endorsement of your product and act on 
it. 

Here at WPDQ we consider community 
stature of equal importance with ratings. 
A station with community acceptance at- 
tracts citizens of stature as listeners — 
alert listeners — loyal listeners — buying 
listeners!" 




COMMUNITY STATURE BUILDING 
FEATURES AT WPDQ INCLUDE: 

• Ten times daily News Director Ed 
Grant broadcasts the answers to im- 
portant community questions through 
the actual voice of local authorities. 

• WPDQ News Correspondents report 
local, state and national news direct- 
ly from the spot where news is hap- 
pening, while it is happening. 

• 24 Hour Service — Jacksonville listen- 
ers keep up with the best in music, 
late news and weather anytime of 
the day or night on WPDQ, Jackson- 
ville's only full time radio station. 

• WPDQ is owned, operated and 
staffed by mature, professional peo- 
ple — leaders in community affairs. 

Represented by 
Venard, Rintoul and McConnell 
James S. Ayers, Southeast 



5000 Watts 



600 KC 



WPDQ 

Where alert listeners tune by choice, 
not by chance .... 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The Balaban Stations smashed headlong into one of the old- 
est and knottiest problems of radio this week. Effective 
1 March, advertisers will no longer have to worry about a 
competitor getting "it/io/esoZe" what they pay fidl price for 
— not on Balaban stations. From now on, it's one rate only! 

The newsmaker: Big, dynamic John F. Box, 41-year-old 
executive vice president of Balaban Stations, said this week, "We 
feel that the time is long overdue for all radio stations to face up 
to the fact that one of the greatest detriments to our business is 
the existence of the system of multiple prices for similar service. 
There is only one answer, and that is the single rate card for all 
advertisers, national, local and regional." 

Making the answer stick could cost the Balaban Group as much as 
$100,000 in lost billings this year. But the big stakes are never 
won with a small bet, and Box 
has plunked on the table the 
integrity of three strong stations: 
WRIT, Milwaukee; WIL, St. 
Louis, and his own namesake 
KBOX, Dallas. If this, the first 
effort by a station group to smash 
the wheeling-and-dealing excesses 
of unscrupulous advertisers, is suc- 
cessful and eventually supported 
by other station groups, then the 
whole industry stands to win. 

About four months of study and 
agency surveys lie behind the 
decision of the Balaban operation 
to set up a single rate equitable 

to all. Some advertisers, accustomed to abusing the practice of local 
rates, may get hurt, but the majority of harrassed media buyers 
stand to gain. This is demonstrated by a conversation Box had last 
week with a top agency exec representing an account which had 
been one of the big ones in spot radio and which had cut back 
drastically. "We ran into so many inequities and complications last 
year," he said, "that we just don't want to go through it again." 

"I don't see," Box told sponsor, "how SRA, RAB and NAB can 
avoid backing up this move to make spot easier to buy." 

That Box is the logical person to inaugurate and carry through 
this crackdown on chiseling is pretty well established by his past 
record — not only at Balaban where he helped move WIL (a former 
net affiliate) to Hooper position No. 1 in less than a year, but by his 
spectacular record in the development of the Bartell stations in the 
five years from 1952 to 1957 when he was exec v.p. there. ^ 




John F. Box 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



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NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

WZOfC appoints EASTMAN 





robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



national representatives of radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

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New York 22, N. Y. 
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CHICAGO: 

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Financial 6-7640 



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DALLAS: 

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Dallas, Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 



ST. LOUIS: 

Syndicate Trust Bldg. 
915 Olive St. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 




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JOHN 
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& Company 



* PULSE -TRENDEX 



Timebuyers 
at work 





Bobbie Landers, John \^ . Shaw Advertising. Chicago, feels that 
the broadcast industry should initiate a public relations program to 
elevate its prestige and standing with the public. "W hen I tell peo- 
ple I'm connected with radio and television." Bobbie says, "people 
regard me as something akin to a two-headed monster and ask why 
I can't do anything to eliminate 
all the commercials on the air." 
Bobbie points out that no other 
industry has ever accepted more 
fully the responsibility of being 
its own strict censor, and that the 
high standards maintained are 
considered its heritage. "But is 
this enough?" she asks. "Other 
media throw rocks at broadcast- 
ing, editorial and otherwise, and 
the only rebuttals are those which 
appear in the trade press." Bobbie 
thinks one way the industry might improve the public attitude would 
he to establish education scholarships to bring young people into the 
business by choice rather than by accident. "Also, if more stations 
would take editorial stands on local issues, it would give broad- 
casting the same kind of stature and prestige of the newspapers."' 

Doug Humm, Charles W. Hoyt Co.. Inc.. New York, points to the 
large listening potential of car radio as just one indication of radios 
capacity to reach. "Look Magazine's (May-June. 1957 1 National 
Automotive Survey." Doug notes, "reported that 75*1- of the cars 
on the road have radios. Furthermore, it showed that 73 % of I .S. 

households own one or more cars, 
which means that of the 50 mil- 
lion L . S. homes. 36.5 own cars. 
Single-car households come to 83.1 
of the total, multi-car households 
come to 17' f." Travel and high- 
way figures for automobiles. Doug 
says, emphasize the listening po- 
tential even more. In 1957, ac- 
cording to the Automotive Manu- 
gM gfe||. facturers Assn.'s report, there 

were 3.5 million miles of streets 
and highways, over which there 
were 525 billion car miles. As new highways are built over the next 
10 years, Doug feels these figures will increase astronomically. "Of 
course, we do not have adequate figures on radio car listening even 
now." Doug says, "but even a conservative estimate would indicate 
that listeners are going to increase in proportion to the car miles.' 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



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SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

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in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



24 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1958 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



It begins to look as if the air media will experience one of their healthiest 
summers. 

Some of the top-rank advertisers — according to agenc) reports — are toying with the idea 
of not waiting for the fall to step up their commitments; instead, they'll gel off a 
heavy wave or two during the summer. 

Note this: Budget-making — as contrasted with a year ago — is taking place in 
a favorable economic climate. 



Here's a really encouraging sign for national spot radio: MeCnnu-Eriekson has 
recommended to Esso that it resume radio in 15-20 markets. 

Esso right now is using 36 radio stations in 32 markets; the proposed addition would 
get the list up to around 50. 

On the tv side, Esso is using 46 stations in 46 markets. The program format: 
37 stations, news; 8 stations, weather; 1 station, half-hour film. 

Principal reason for the radio-expansion suggestion: the out-ol-homc audience. 



Tv reps were kept on the hop this week lining up availabilities for several heft) 

pieces of new business. Among them: 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE AGENTS (Doremus) : A weekly five- 
minute program of news or weather, starting 2 March and running through August in what 
could well be over 150 markets. 

AVON COSMETICS (Breher) : A flock of new markets are being added, with 
schedules averaging 10 spots a week. Budgets will be increased in February and much of 
the business will be moved back into prime time. 

BISSELL CARPET SWEEPER (Burnett) : Using daj and night minutes in 80 mar- 
kets for 13 weeks, stressing the Shampoo Master. 



The debate over the single rate could have a lot to do with the present lag in 
new business for national spot radio. 

Several agency media directors in the past two weeks have indicated to SPONSOR-SCOPE 
that they had clients who were holding off making spot radio commitments until it 
became clear where the local vs. national rate situation — at least in the key markets 
was headed. 

Another pertinent observation from the same sources: Clients have been wondering 
about the impact of CBS Radio's Program Consolidation Plan. 

In any event, the general impression garnered from media people is thai the slowdown 
in spot radio is basically psychological and probabl) will turn oul to be of short 
duration. 



National spot tv, on the oilier hand. keeps moving along at a bright clip. 

A cross-check of reps this week brought the general prediction that this month maj 
prove to be a record January in new business hooked — and perhaps in current hill- 
ings, too. 

Rather unusual about the business that's been coming in this month: The starling 
dates mostly have been for January. 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1950 



13 



14 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



National spot radio took a nice spurt this week. And happily a couple of auto- 
motives were on the list of new business. 

Among the week's accounts — note that they're all using flights — were: 

FORD: A three- week campaign, via JWT, in the top 100-or-so markets, with schedules 
depending on local requirements. 

OLDSMOBILE: Upwards of 12 one-minute spots a week, through D. P. Brother, for 
three weeks in 65 top markets. 

TRIG (Bristol-Myers) : Two four-week flights, via BBDO, in February and June in top 
10 markets at the rate of 12 one-minute spots a week. 

RED HEART DOG FOOD: Around 30 spots a week for four weeks in 115 markets 
through John W. Shaw, Chicago. 

NORTHERN TISSUE: Another eight-weeks in around 40 markets, via Chicago Y&R. 

Following flights in test markets, Clinton E. Frank, Chicago, is buying schedules on a 
general plan for Toni's Bobbi-Pin Curl. 

Judging from the October and November figures, the gross billings of the three tv 
networks for 1958 should total around $565 million — 10% over 1957. 

LNA-BAR calculations of gross time for November 1958, released by TvB: ABC TV, 
$10,338,126, up 27.9% over Nov. 1957; CBS TV, $21,853,592, up 2.1%; NBC TV, $19,817,- 
075, up 7.1%. (Incidentally, as a result of the introduction of a new contiguous rate, 
CBS and NBC's November grosses were slightly lower than the October figures.) 

Media planners in top agencies report that the current crossfire over values be- 
tween the newspaper and tv interests has been of constructive use to them. 

The deluge of research material they've been getting the past several weeks from both 
sides has provided quite an education for them not only in relative costs but the basic 
thinking of the two media. 

One thing, they say, that stands out like a sore thumb is the low cost-per-1000-home- 
impressions of spot tv, in particular. 

This has been offbeat week for network radio, if only in regard to the amount of 
listening and newspaper attention it drew with a couple documentaries. 

The programs: CBS' saga of the place of the call girl in American business and 
the tee-off on NBC's Image Russia series. 

CBS' documentary, particularly, captured more lineage — the N. Y. Times and Herald- 
Tribune each devoting about a column — than any tv broadcast has since the Khrushchev inter- 
view. 

Comment heard along Madison Avenue: The blue-noses may complain but you have to 
admit that CBS has been venturing into areas that surely will stimulate interest in 
the medium. 

Watch for more and more middle-sized agencies to appoint executives whose 
prime function will be to find additional uses for air media among clients. 

The trend has a strong economic reason: 

The ratio of net income from air media runs 7-9% as against 1-2% for print. In 
fact, an agency with 30% of its billings in air media can account for 75% of its net income 
from tv and radio alone. 

The basic requirement for such executives : An analytical mind that is steeped in 
media values and can figure out how to get the maximum returns out of the various 
uses of radio/tv. 

Such operators often make the best sales for radio. They know, for instance, just what 
type and frequency of announcement would best fit the advertiser's message and cam- 
paign objective. 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

If you're doing any cost-per-thousand calculations for nighttime network tv, you 
ought to find out beforehand whether the advertiser has one of those out-of-pocket 
arrangements with the network for the alternate week. 

In case he has, his cost-per will be way below the norm. Here's why this happens: 

Though the sponsor is getting six commercial minutes on the half-hour program over two 
weeks, his charges for the second week are only what the network lays out for fa- 
cilities (plus 15% commission on this to the agency of record). 

Broadly speaking, his bill for talent and time the first week would be $85-90,000 and 
somewhere around $25,000 for the alternate week. That pulls the cost-per-commercial- 
minute down to around $19,000. The CPCM under normal circumstances: $30-35,000. 

Naturally, this windfall disappears in the event the network is able to find a 
sponsor for the alternate week. 

Though the show is on every week, ABC TV affiliates will he getting compensation 
for Man With the Camera only every third week. 

Reason: That's the new schedule GE has set for the program. 

The arrangement includes a cross-plug for the same sponsor in the two open weeks. 

It's the first time that a network has had this type of commercial continuity. 

The jockeying by advertisers for position on the tv networks in fall already has 
begun. 

The strategm is to buy short term in key spots and various programs, thereby get- 
ting a pretty good list of starters for the new season. 

ABC TV, for instance, reports that for the first time advertisers are "backing up" 
their orders on time periods and programs to insure choice placements. 

Some veteran agency showmen have fashioned a ready answer for clients that 
complain there are too many westerns on tv. 

Their argument is along this line : 

Popularity in entertainment forms has always traveled in cycles. The theme and back- 
ground aren't the only things that catch the popular fancy. It's the quality of producing, 
writing, and pictorial effort applied to a particular form that makes the difference. As 
it happens, much of the topnotch talent in the entertainment business lately has been 
channeled into westerns — just as it once was concentrated into the boy-meets-girl area. 

The position of the networks as middlemen for the sale of Hollywood-made tv 
film is more prominent than ever this year. 

Of the 79 films now on the evening network schedules, 49 have been bought through 
the networks, while the remaining 30 were brought in by agencies. 

By network, the instruments of responsibility for the shows' purchase stack up 

this way: 

NETWORK NO. NETWORK DELIVERED NO. AGENCY DELIVERED 

ABC TV 23 6 

CBS TV 12 14 

NBC TV 14 10 

Total 49 30 

In terms of number hours per week of programing, the ratio is 27^4 h r9 « network- 
delivered to 16 hrs. agency-delivered. By individual network, the same comparison looks 
like this: ABC, 12 hrs. to 3l/ 2 hours; CBS TV, 7 hrs. to 7V 2 hours; NBC TV, 8y 2 hrs. to 5 hrs. 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 15 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

The majority of night tv network shows delivered over 10 million tv homes in 
1958, says Nielsen via TvB. Thus: 

NUMBER OF HOMES 
PER EVENING PROGRAM I'CT. OF PROGRAMS 

Over 10,000,000 homes 54.4% 

5-10,000,000 homes 33.1 

3-5,000,000 homes 11.0 

Under 3,000,000 homes '' 1.5 

Note: The actual number of those reaching over 10 million homes is 69; under 
3 million, 2. 

Judging from the planning going on in bellwether agencies strong in durable accounts, 
your can look for a sharp revival of the corporate-image sell. 

The thinking: 

With all the company mergers and product diversifications that have been taking 
place, advertisers will find it necessary to acquaint customers down the line with the 
prestige and background of the advertiser. 

Where spot will benefit: As the big companies tend to centralize their facilities, 
much of the corporate-image building will be focused in regional and local cam- 
paigns. 

Chicago media buyers are bent on making Michigan Avenue aware of the true 
status of their roles: As a first step they're organizing themselves into what they ten- 
tatively have labeled the Chicago Media Buyers Group. 

Their activities will include a workshop dealing with current problems and trends; and 
they'll discuss some pressing issue at a monthly meeting. 

The February get-together will deal with the local vs. national rate in air media. 

What probably actuated Lincoln National Insurance, of Fort Wayne, more than 
anything else to sponsor Meet Mr. Lincolnfor a single shot 11 February was this: 

The telecast on NBC TV would serve as a showcase for a film whose off-the-air 
right it wanted in behalf of its local agents. 

The circuit will include high-schools, women's clubs, luncheon clubs, etc. 

Massey-Ferguson has resorted to a cash premium device not only to spur tractor 
sales but to make sure dealers themselves are taking full advantage of the air campaign. 

The show: U. S. Jubilee, starring Red Foley, on ABC TV. 

The promotion : The dealer submits the names of tractor buyers for the next four weeks, 
and each purchaser gets a check for $100 signed by Foley. 

Note: A common complaint among durable goods advertisers is that their biggest 
hitch is to get dealers to support a promotional campaign. 

Sellers of air media may have a source of revenue in the various products that 
are taking advantage of the Slenderella name image by tying in with it on a franchise 
basis. 

One recent franchiser already set to go radio saturation is Mason & Mason rootbeer 
(I. J. Kosebloom, Chicago, is the agency). 

Others with recently linked brands to Slenderella: Krim-Ko skim milk, Chicago; 
IVliinsiiigwear, nylon hose, Minneapolis. 

Slenderella's twin motive: (!) royalties; (2) recoup some of its good will. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 58; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 70; Washington Week, page 65; sponsor 
Hears, page 68; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 82; and Film-Scope, page 66. 

16 sponsor • 24 JANUARY 1959 





SOLD AMERICAN 

Big Markets For LUCKY STRIKI 
First Major Syndicated Bu 
For This Leading Cigaret 

(via BBD 




-ft;,.H< 



X 





39 ALL- NEW 



FIRST RUN 
HALF HOUR 



LLOVDNOLAN 

A truly great actor plays "Special Agent 7" of the Intelligence Division, U. S. 
Department of Internal Revenue — in fighting encounters with the nation's 
most sinister lawbreakers. Here come high ratings again from your No. 1 
Distributor of TV Film Programs - MCA TV. 

IMMEDIATELY OPEN FOR REGIONAL AND LOCAL SPONSORSHIP 




produced by I p ; , g 'tJ^^L '' \^2 productions 
producers of MIKE HAMMER and STATE TROOPER 



mca tv 



Write, wire, phone I L V : ILM SYNDICATION 

598 Madison Avenue, New York 22 • PLaza 9-7500 and principal cities everywhere 




I 




RATING 



m 



v 



WSPD-TV is TOLEDO 

with its star-spangled 
top feature films . . . 

Buy WSPD-TV... 
and you buy Toledo 
across the board! 
Ask your Katz man 



Storer Television. 



WSPD-TV 

Toledo 



WJW-TV 

Cleveland 



WJBK-TV 

Detroit 



WAGA-TV 

Atlanta 



WITI-TV 

Milwaukee 






SCREEN GEMS 
SCREEN GUILD 
MPTV 



Fa,m< 



e local scene' 




HANN 






by Joe Csida 



I Sp 



onsor 




Fidel Castro and friend 

\\ hether you're of the hard-boiled school, jjp 
which views Latin and Central America revolu- 
tions as something produced by the Schuberts. 
with music by Otto Harbach, whether you 
shudder at the bloodshedding, or whether 
you're just curious to find out what manner of 
man is this Castro, and what might his spectacu- 
lar win portend for the free world versus the 
Commies — whichever your basic interest, tv in the closing days of 
the recent Cuban civil war did a right handsome job of throwing 
some light on the over-all situation. 

The newscasts, one and all, eventually caught up with the vic- 
torious rebel leader, and the panelists on the CBS Face the Nation 
show had a fascinating set-to with Mr. Castro. He came off. in these 
serious shows as a soft-spoken, dedicated spearhead for a demo- 
cratic Cuba, with no squeamishness whatsoever when it came to 
eliminating in the most final manner possible the enemies of the 
state, and/or Batista followers. 

Unpressed and battle-weary 

For those who preferred a slightly lighter approach, there was 
the interview Ed Sullivan did with young Castro on his Sunday 
night stanza, the first Sunday after Fidel reached Havana. 

But the operetta touch was supplied by the man I vote the 
smartest showman in video today, Jack Paar. Jack didn't have 
Castro on the show, but the day after the New York papers I and 1 
guess the dailies in many another metropolitan area) were front- 
paging Errol Flynn's gallant participation in the fight against 
Batista. Jack came up with none other than dashing. Errol. himself. 

Canny host that he is. Jack tossed off a few teasers about the fact 
that Flynn was going to make an appearance, before the actor 
finally came on. Finally came the moment. In that incredible way he 
has of making a soft-spoken introduction seem like a fanfare. Jack 
introduced the one, the only, the battle-scarred-but-shucks-it-\\a>- 
nothing soldier of fortune. Errol. yes, Errol Flynn, direct from the 
hills of Oriente province with a short stopover in Havana. 

"He just got off a plane a few hours ago," Jack explained, "so 
forgive him if he hasn't had a chance to clean up." 

Flynn had obviously not had a chance to clean up. His sport coat 
looked as though he might have had it wrapped around the cage in 
which he carried a parakeet all the wa\ from Santiago. His trousers 
were innocent of any sustained crease. Around his neck he wore 
v. hat seemed to be a dashing, dark kerchief, but later turned out to 
be a Castro battle flag. In the hand in which he was not holding the 
parakeet cage, he held a virile-looking walking stick. 

Flynn had obviously not \et regained his land legs either. For be 



sponsor 



24 JANUARY 1959 



The nation's top city for 
greatest gain in business, 
and the area served by its 
two television stations. 

Jskejcemi* 

iHlesisejpf* 

jjk Coni»m«r Spsndabl* Incomi 



WfcCT 

channel 3 
see HOLLINGBERY 

ciMnel *12 
see KATZ 



21 







lW« 




/^ RADIO KPQ GETS 
/ \ RESULTS .... 

2°1 





And We Challenge All 
other North Central 
Washington Media To 
Disprove Us! 

Strong Statement? Yes . . . 
But, KPQ is prepared to back 
that claim . . . with $MONEY 
on the line. 
(In Five Years, No Takers) 

Whei you buy Inland Washing- 
ton, Why waste money testing? 
Use the ONE MEDIUM that 
produces 2 to I. 

USE KPQ 
WENATCHEE 

AN ABC-NBC AFFILIATE 






5000 WATT! 
560 K.C. 
WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 



PORTLAND & SEATTLE REPS 
Art Moore and Associates 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Forjoe and Co., Incorporated 



u 

; 



Sponsor backstage continued 



lurched slightly as he made his way to Paar's desk, upon which he 
placed his cage and stick. He was gallantry personified as he bowed 
to Genevieve, and took a seat alongside Paar, who was seated a 
this point beside the little French singer. 

"You know Genevieve, of course," Paar said, mindful that he ha 
just told a little story about Flynn's first encounter with Genevieve. 

Flynn rose like a veritable Rhett Butler, cleared his throat, made 
a sweeping bow in the general direction of Genevieve, and mumbled: 

"I don't believe I've had the pleasure." 

Paar gently reminded him that he had, indeed, had the pleasure, 
and Flynn quickly and graciously acknowledged his mistake. 

Jack then asked Flynn if he would tell how he managed to join 
Castro in the hills. Flynn looked around, apparently to see if any 
Batista men were eavesdropping, then said: 

"Well, Jack, it was very difficult, and I'd like to tell you, but it's 
still top secret. I'm just not permitted to tell you." 

Not one to press, Jack segued to: 

"Was it tough, Errol, in the hills with Castro? Weren't there 
many hardships? 

"Oh, yes," said Errol, "it was very tough. For days we lived on 
tangerines and water. A terrible diet, especially for me. Especially 
the water." 

Jack was quickly sympathetic, "Yes," he said, "I understand all 
the bars in Havana were closed, too." 

"Yes, it was terrible, terrible!" said Flynn. 

Who is this Errol Flynn? 

It turned out eventually that the reason Flynn had brought the 
caged parakeet was for the purpose of presenting it to an American 
Boy Scout. The bird, it seemed, was the gift of a high Castro official, 
who has assigned Flynn the task of making the presentation to a 
Boy Scout in America. 

Out came the most Boy Scout-looking Boy Scout since this vener- 
able organization of America's young males was invented. He had 
tortoise shell-rimmed glasses. He had a most ingenious, brave ex- 
pression on his face. 

Flynn stood before him, reading from a newspaper clipping 
which contained a story which somehow related to the presentation. 
The Boy stood at ramrod-backed, courteous attention. Finally Errol 
gave him the bird, and patted him on the head : 

"And don't forget," he admonished the lad, "to give him his 
vodka every morning. ' 

Jack, as usual, saved the day. He leaped into the scene, laughed 
heartily, and said : 

"Of course, Mr. Flynn's only fooling. We all know you don't give 
a parakeet vodka, don't we?" 

A day or so later, virtually all the newscasts carried a Castro 
press conference. 

"What about Errol Flynn?" asked a reporter. 

"Who is this Errol Flynn?" asked the puzzled rebel chieftain, 

They don't carry the Paar show in Cuba. ^ 



22 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



*° 



tfie* 1 - 









> 



award 

winning 

audience 



tov« 



<m 



i n o>tf-»' I promotion 



T«X NBC NEW YORK 

V| R ROBERSON JRv 

PRESIDENT & GENERM- rMNftGER-r 

mSuMTOII NORTH ««OLIH», pR0( , T, ON CONTEST 

rE R K ^r^ 

.rc.iir.TES ENTERED THE CONTEST* ««" pro grAMS WERE 
E.GHTY NBC-TV »FF""M» NEVIORKiS M"'""™ , ,oO-,000 

u ,„ or low. «JW»M ,„,,„. 



there's 



•I nothing finer in eastern north coro.ina 




television 
for eastern 
north Carolina 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 




Reps.: Headley-Reed Television 

James S. Ayers Co. 




23 




WBB 



For 36 years, the most honored and rl 

sponsored station in the natil 

SECOND MARK' 




I I 




K show manship and LIVE sales manship 
Ct the finest local and national 



advertisers in Chicago to 

BBM RADIO 



Chicago \f Show manship Station 



Bill Connelly— WHitehall 4-6000 or CBS Radio Spot Sales 



in Knoxville 

The BIG 10 



is now 



The BIG 1 



NOV., 58 ARB 

(4-WEEK RATING) 

• 20 out of the top 30 shows in 
Knoxville are on the BIG 10, WBIR-TV. 

• In the daytime, from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM, 
WBIR-TV had 158 top rated quarter hours; 
Station B had 93; Station C had none. 

• In the evening, from 6:00 PM to Midnight, 
WBIR-TV had 89 top rated quarter hours; 
Station B had 79; Station C had none. 

Ask your KATZ man 

WBIR-TV, Ctl.lO 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. • CBS 
"Knoxville's Number 1 Station" 



49th am 
Madison 



26 



More on oil controversy 

I can speak only for my company and 
the manner in which our. advertising.. 
is conceived and executed but from 
conversations with my counterparts 
and friends in the industry, such as 
Hattwick, I do not feel that we oper- 
ate here a great deal differently than 
they do. For this reason there are 
questions in our minds concerning 
the position of your column Com- 
mercial Commentary 6 December is- 
sue page 10 headed "So I said to the 
Shiek of Bahrein". 

In the first place I do not believe 
that oil company board members 
give such light consideration to prob- 
lems presented to them as one would 
interpret from your column. Sec- 
ondly, it is difficult for us to believe 
that the boards themselves actuallv 
give consideration to the individual 
ad campaigns, the theme, format, 
and so forth. If we are the worst ad- 
vertised big industry let's not alibi 
our way out of the dilemma by 
blaming our directors. 

K. W. Rugh 

Phillips Petroleum Co. 

Bartlesville, Okla. 

Needed comments 

Joe Csida's comments in your Janu- 
ary 10th issue concerning the Blair 
newspaper strike survey are most wel- 
come. Any media research that is 
without a positive story will tend to 
hurt all media. There is a need for 
" — positive, constructive, believable 
selling, and with becoming dignity." 
We at the Bureau of Advertising 
(ANPA) evaluate our research proj- 
ects on two points — (1) Are they 
good for advertising? (2) Do they 
present a positive story for our me- 
dium? 

Our thanks to Mr. Csida and SPON- 
SOR — a well-read magazine at the 
Bureau. 

Howard D. Hadley 
research vice president 
Bureau of Advertising 
New York 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



Radio Basics 

Looking over your Radio Basics (3 
January, 1959) you report 93 mil- 
lion radios in homes. Since there are 
45 million homes, each with a mini- 
mum of 3*4 radios — the total should 
read 157,500,000 sets. In our own 
home, we have 11 radios plus two 
car radios. 

1 think a realistic appraisal is in 
order to properly evaluate the force 
of radio. 

Jack Poppele 
Santa s Land 
Vermont 

• SPONSOR does not know the source of 
Reader Poppele's figures, but ours come from 
RAR and Nielsen. 

Too important 

Your statement that SPONSOR is "much 
too important for light reading on a 
routing list" is 1000f true. 

To do sponsor justice, it is neces- 
sary to take it home and devote an 
evening, or at least the major part 
of one to it. 

Grand reading and an education! 

Ed Boyd 

sales promotion co-ordinator 

Okanogan Radio 

Kelowna, B. C, Canada 

Elgin's baby 

As you know, 75 copies of your 
20 December issue ("Elgin's Amaz- 
ing Christmas Baby" page 23) have 
already been shipped to Elgin Na- 
tional Watch Company for use at 
their recent National Sales Meeting. 
Needless to say, all of the people 
at Elgin, as well as people on our 
staff were most flattered with your 
wonderful story. The demand for this 
story has exceeded the number of 
copies they have. 

Jack Baity 

/. Walter Thompson 

Chicago 



W f f l 



Any Comments? 

sponsor likes to hear from 
its readers. Your comments 
or your criticism represents 
one of our best methods of 
insuring that ive are accom- 
plishing our purpose. Letters 
should be addressed to: 49th 
& Madison Editor c/o spon- 
sor, 40 East 49th St., New 
York 17, New York. 



POPEYE THEATRE 




* 



Popularity like this caused us to look at our hole card, 
so now we're opening up 11-12 a.m., Saturdays, to 
accommodate Popeye participators. May we serve you? 
(Imagine . . . 18.7 in Class "B" time . . . the little guy 
doesn't know his own strength!) 

Whether you want little folks or big, here is proof 
of the pulling power of KOCO-TV — delivering the 
biggest area of unduplicated coverage in Oklahoma. 
If you didn't get your copy of our market-and-station- 
data file folder, pick up the phone and we'll rush one 
to you. 




Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



Charlie Keys, General Manager 



LAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 




J^bcl 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



CHANNEL 5 

27 



fi 



THE PIOPII 






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iffS 



L °s Angeles I S? 



LANDSLID 

Mil 

I WDAF-TU 

Kansas Citj 

SRO FIRST WEEK ON I 






featuring 

PATRICIA 

BRESLIN 

THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE 

; *^-^- ri ^^. >H , m>t| , ltl>Wi|lw<t> 

'LSE- OCTOBER, 1958 







/.■.■.-.•,;■*-?.;.. 




//? 



3 



■•■*?•;'■", >.c' ■ 



\t's a show title! 
's a proved fact// 




Produced by 
IRVING BRECHER 



Written by 
ALLAN LIPSCOTT & 
ROBERT FISHER ; 



Francisco 

a ,l syndicated shows 



among a» - 



■>r n 




FRESNO 

fpong all syndicated shows 







'/'rVnf. 5»»" She 

-^ f K ^OG£R Co *'" G 

I U ^R BROS. 

I Bn Nuc OA 

•, psocr «*« N8lE 

WCKS 
"J^any ot/lers 






Hlffli get 

IWfk ing 



'still time to 
get on the bandwagon 



good markets' 




7-COUNTY PULSE REPORT 

KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK AREA — MARCH 1958 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE — MONDAY-FRIDAY 


6 A.M.- 12 NOON 
12 NOON - 6 P.M. 
6 P.M. - 12 MIDNIGHT 


WKZO | Station "B" 


Station "C" 


32 
29 
30 


22 
22 
20 


10 
10 
11 



BUT... WKZO Radio Will Put 

Wind In Your Sails 

In Kalamazoo - Battle Creek! 

WKZO Radio can "sail" your selling message into more 
Kalamazoo-Battle Creek homes each day than any other 
radio station! WKZO gives you an audience 43% larger 
than that of the next station — day and night. 

Pulse (see left) points to WKZO Radio as the leader in 
this important market — morning, afternoon and night — 
every day! 

Your Avery-Knodel man has the proof on the big WKZO 
Radio audience in Kalamazoo-Battle Creek and Greater 
Western Michigan. Ask him for it! 

*Columbia, the U.S. entry, won the 1958 America's Cup from 
Britain's Sceptre in four straight races. 




WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADULAC, MICHIGAN 
KOIN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 



WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 
WMBD-TV — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



WKZO 



CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 




30 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



SPO NSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



*tT ONE OF A SPECIAL SPONSOR SERIES 




SPONSOR'S 



$500,000,000 



PLAN FOR 
SPOT RADIO 



^Jeginning with this issue, sponsor presents in a 
series of weekly articles a new long-range business 
plan for the national spot radio industry. 

sponsor believes (see detailed reasons later in 
this article) that spot radio can and should be a half- 
billion dollar industry by 1963 — even though this 
would mean nearly tripling the advertising dollars 
spent in the medium in 1958. 

We are convinced, however, that national spot 
radio can never achieve its proper stature in the 
advertising world without more sound, clear-headed 
over-all business planning than the industry has seen 
to date. 

Let's be completely honest about the facts. 

Spot radio business last year has been variously 
estimated at $165 to $190 million and neither total 
was satisfactory to anyone. Both were far short of 
spot radio's real potential in the light of other adver- 



tising developments and marketing trends. 

Even more serious, the last six months of 1958 
showed a progressive softening of agency and adver- 
tiser enthusiasm for radio spot. This was reflected 
both in time sales and in many conversations spon- 
sor has had with agency men and advertisers in 
recent months. 

A letter received last week from John Heverlv, 
v.p. of Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, Portland, 
Ore. pretty well sums up what is becoming almost 
a standard advertiser-agency attitude. 

Mr. Heverly feels that spot radio must be made 
"easier to understand, easier to buy, and more effec- 
tive," and that ways must be found to "save sales 
expense, and, most important, stop the evil practice 
of each station in a market selling down the compe- 
tition to a point where all radio suffers from doubt, 
misinformation, and complete confusion."" 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



31 



WHO SPONSOR'S $500 MILLION, 5-YEAR 
SPOT RADIO PLAN WAS DEVELOPED 



Spot radio today is standing at a 
cross-roads. If it continues along the 
dusty path it has been following, then 
SPONSOR believes that this "doubt, 
misinformation, and confusion" will 
continue to grow, and that spot 
radio's identity, reputation and bill- 
ings will continue to diminish. 

But if, at this point, radio station 
owners and radio station representa- 
tives, acting both in groups and indi- 
vidually, can strike out boldly along 
a new road in a new direction, then 
we believe they will find almost un- 
dreamed of rewards. 

It is in this belief, and with this 
faith that sponsor presents its new 
$500.00.000 business plan to the spot 
radio industry. 

How the SPONSOR plan was 
developed 

Sponsor's half-billion dollar spot 
radio plan represents an effort to 
bring together, focus and give organic 
structure to the best ideas of the in- 
dustry on spot radio problems. 

During the past year the editors of 
sponsor have talked to literally hun- 
dreds of advertisers, agency media 
men, account executives, radio station 
operators, station representatives, and 
executives of various trade groups. 

We have in our files scores of 
letters on every phase of spot radio 
from rates, research, and programing 
down to the need for establishing and 
selling a new spot radio "corporate 
image." ( See box on pages 34, 35. 1 

We have attended meetings and 
conferences on spot radio in every 
part of the country, and have listened 
to all sorts of suggestions — from time- 
buvers, media directors, representa- 
tive-salesmen, and even the presidents 
of companies spending hundreds of 
thousands in radio spot. 

But finally we got a little weary of 
all the meetings and talk. 

It seemed to us that spot radio 
today needs a constructive program 
more than it needs further panel dis- 
cussions. And it struck us that spon- 
sor was in a peculiarly fortunate posi- 
tion to formulate and advance such 
a program. 

Because of our closeness to agencies 



and advertisers, our perspective on 
spot radio is necessarily different, and 
in some ways it may be more objec- 
tive than that of individual stations 
or industry groups. 

Our concern is simply the over-all 
health of the medium itself. Our goal 
is only that spot radio as a whole 
should achieve its proper place in the 
advertising sun. 

Naturally, in drawing up the spon- 
sor $500 Million Plan, we have used 
valuable ideas and information from 
many sources. We will quote these 
sources as we explain the plan. We 
are particularly indebted to SRA. 
RAB, and NAB, as well as to individ- 
ual radio and advertising executives. 

What we are attempting to do here 
is to bring all the ideas and sugges- 
tions together, in one organized easy- 
to-understand package which can 
serve as a guide and a challenge to the 






entire spot radio industry. 

Steps in the SPONSOR Plan 

We believe spot radio's current 
dilemma should be approached as a 
practical business problem. It should 
have the same type of long-range busi- 
ness planning that a modern executive 
gives to the affairs of a major corpo- 
ration. 

In our opinion it will take at least 
five years to reach spot radio's 
potential and five major steps are 
necessary : 

1) Setting up new sales goals for 
the medium based on a more honest 
and realistic appraisal of the total 
advertising picture, and of spot 
radio's true power and potential. 

2) Formulating neiv basic business 
strategy for the industry to be fol- 
lowed by both individuals and groups. 
At the present time, many of the ideas 
suggested for radio spot are merely 
"tactical" rather than "strategic." 
Before the industry starts worrying 
about tactics, it needs to adopt a com- 
pletely new over-all, long-range busi- 
ness strategy. This strategy will differ 



piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 

RADIO'S SHARE OF AD DOLLARS 

(% of national advertising in net and spot combined) 



1943 
13.3% 



1948 
11.9% 



1963 (goal 
9.0% 



1953 
6.3% 



1958 

4.2% 



Figures for 1943-1958 are from McCann-Erkkson-Printers' Ink reports, SPON- 
SOR'S goal of 9.0% in 1963 is based on an estimated $7.2 billion total expendi- 
tures by national advertisers in 1963, and assumes that spot radio can do at 
least $550 million and net radio $100 million in that year. See text for an 
explanation of this projection 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



32 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



ilil!llillllllll!llllllllll!l!llll!!lifilM Ill Ill 



SPOT RADIO'S RECORD— AND ITS POTENTIAL 





54 


55 


'56 


57 


58 


59 '60 '61 


'62 '63 


•64 












1 




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600 

illion 

575 

550 

525 

500 

475 

450 

425 

400 

375 

350 

325 

300 

275 

250 

225 

200 

175 

150 

125 

100 

Note: figures for 1954-1957 are from McCann-Erickson-Printer's Ink report. 195S estimate (which SPONSOR believes too high) is from same 
source, based on projection of 1st 6 months of 1958. Figures for 1959-1963 are totals which SPONSOR feels are possible for spot radio if $500 
Million Plan is carried out 



llllllllll!lillllllllliiailllllllilll!lil!IIIIIH Illl 'lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli^ 



from that currently pursued in many 
quarters. 

3 1 Putting spot radio's house in 
order. Once both goals and basic 
strategy have been decided on, it will 
be increasingly apparent that many 
of spot radio's practices will have to 
be overhauled, sponsor will point out 
these needs and suggest corrections. 

4) Building up spot radio's 
strength. In addition to correcting 
abuses and mistakes, spot radio must 
also add to its power and effective- 
ness. There are main possible ways 
to do this, and SPONSOR will present 
a series of practical suggestions. 

5) Selling spot radio s image and 
Power. Finally, the spot radio indus- 
try needs a new type of selling, one 
that more accuratelv reflects its true 
power and more correctly presents its 
true "corporate image/' In this area 
SPONSOR will explain a basic selling 
philosophy which can be adapted by 
individual stations and representa- 
tives, as well as by industry groups. 

These five steps in the $500 Million 
Plan will be presented in successive 



issues of sponsor. Here is the first 
one. 

STEP ONE— New Sales Coals 
for Spot Radio 

In the 10 years since tv became a 
major factor in the advertising scene, 
many radio men have suffered a kind 
of group inferiority complex about 
their medium. 

The effect of this inferiority com- 
plex has been to make them aim too 
low and be satisfied with too little 
in radio incomes. 

During 1958 an estimated $10 bill- 
ion was spent for advertising in the 
U.S. Of this more than $6 billion was 
spent by national advertisers, those 
in whom spot radio has a special 
interest. 

Yet from national advertisers all 
radio I network and spot combined) 
received only 4.2 C < of total appropri- 
ations. 

This compares with totals of 12' \ 
to 15% which radio once received 
and the blame cannot all be placed 
on tv. 



The fact is that radio, as a national 
advertising medium has suffered out 
of all proportion to its desserts and 
merits. 

In 1958, for instance, national ad- 
vertisers spent nearly three times as 
much Ian estimated $740 million) 
in newspapers as they did in radio. 

They spent an estimated $765 mil- 
lion in magazines. Even outdoor, an 
advertising medium than cannot be- 
gin to show radios record of proven 
sales power, received an estimated 
$138 million. 

Radio — all radio — has been getting 
far fewer national advertising dollars 
than it deserves. And sponsor be- 
lieves that this is particularly true of 
radio spot. 

Today, the emphasis in radio has 
swung from network to spot radio 
and roughly three out of even four 
dollars spent b\ national advertisers 
in radio is spent on a spot basis. 

This compares with such years as 
1943 and 1944 when spot radio was 
getting only 3(1-33', of national 
radio appropriations. 



SPONSOR o 24 JANUARY 1959 



33 



FIRST STEP— NEW SALES IMAGE FOR 



SPOT RADIO, REEVALUATED GOALS 



Yet this swing to spot does not, 
in itself, mean very much in light of 
total advertising budgets, or in light 
of the new "marketing revolutions." 
which has upset most old theories of 
advertising planning. 

Today's national advertiser (spon- 
sor is filled with case histories of 
their activities I is swinging more 
and more to "market-by-market" 
selling and it is precisely in this area 
of pinpointed effort that spot radio 
should be enjoying its greatest boom. 

Yet, as the chart on page 33 shows, 
spot radio's progress has been rela- 
tively slow. It has not, in fact, kept 
pace with newspapers which between 
1953 and 1957 jumped from $642 to 
$809 millions in national advertising. 
It has not seized its new marketing 
opportunity. 

From its talks with advertising ex- 
ecutives and analysts, sponsor be- 
lieves it is not unreasonable for radio 
to set as its goal a minimum of 



9-10% of total national advertising 
budgets. 

We base this goal on certain 
known facts : 

1. The proven power of radio as a 
selling medium. 

2. The peculiar flexibility and 
adaptability of spot radio to new 
"pinpoint ' marketing strategies. 

3. The special qualities and attri- 
butes possessed by spot radio, and 
b) no other medium. 

During the next five years, it is 
conservatively estimated that total ex- 
penditures by National advertisers in 
the U.S. will increase from the 1958 
level of approximately $6.2 billion to 
at least $7.2 billion, and there is rea- 
son to believe they will be even 
higher. 

If, by 1963, national radio (net 
and national spot combined ) were to 
achieve a minimum 9% of this total, 
then together they would account for 
approximately $650 million in billings. 



sponsor believes that this can be 
done, and we further believe that, in 
achieving such a goal, spot radio will 
have to assume a major share of the 
burden, and will reap a major share 
of the reward. 

Specifically, in looking toward 
1963, we see national radio's sales 
goal divided up as follows: 

Network radio . $100,000,000 

National spot radio $550,000,000 

Our estimate for the. comparatively 
more modest goal for network radio 
is based on recent talks with radio 
network executives as well as on an 
analysis of current marketing trends. 

Even assuming the continued exist- 
ence of four radio networks by 1963, 
there seems little reason to believe 
that network business can possibly in- 
crease by much more than 50% over 
current levels because of the form 
and structure of network operations. 

Such a barrier, however, does not 
exist for national radio spot. On the 
contrary, spot's real opportunity is 
probably greater than sponsor's 9% 
goal indicates, providing the national 
radio spot industry can organize and 
plan its activities intelligently. 

Such planning, and re-organization, 



IlllllllllllllllllllllllllJlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



SPOT RADIO'S "CORPORATE IMAGE" 



One of the needs to be discussed in SPON- 
SOR'S $500 Million Plan for Spot Radio is that 
of rebuilding the "Corporate Image" of the 
medium. Here are some recent, significant com- 
ments from SPOISSOR readers: 

"This 'corporate image' we desire should, 
first and foremost show dependability. Radio 
operators should bend over backwards to keep 
their promises to buyers and listeners. ... In 
addition, they should show- (not just tell) listen- 
ers and buyers an awareness of their needs. 
Spot radio's flexibility enables it to provide serv- 
ices to audiences that no other medium can 
match. 

"Commercially, rate-cutting is the biggest and 
rottenest sore in the industry. It isn't hard to 
see why advertisers put their big bucks into 
newspaper and tv, and squeeze every last spot 



from radio with the remaining dollars. So long 
as radio operators keep trying to undersell each 
other, and trade time for butter and eggs, adver- 
tisers will continue to use them as secondary 
rather than primary medium." 

Edd Rouett, v. p. and gen. mgr. 

KNOE, Monroe, La. 

Let's quit talking about 'corporate image' and 
'imagery transference.' In other words, let's get 
back to simplicity and basics. 

Let's refer to Radio is a big way, for that's 
what radio is — the biggest communications me- 
dium in all the world. 

It is not just a music and news medium. It 
is THE music and news medium. Radio can 
get out the news faster, more reliably, and better 
than any other communication medium. And 
you listen to its music, you don't look at it. 



34 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



however, will take time. There are, 
as subsequent SPONSOR articles on the 
1500 Million Flan will show, a num- 
ber of major steps to be taken, and 
therefore we suggest a gradual "esca- 
lator" of goals for the industry. 

A sales goal timetable 
We believe that a challenging goal 
for national spot radio in 1959 would 
be a total of $225 million in billings 
and that thereafter sales increases 
can move at an accelerating rate. 
Specifically, we propse: 

Sales goals 

1959 ... $225,000,000 

1960 .. $275,000,000 

1961 $350,000,000 

1962 .._ $450,000,000 

1963 .._ $550,000,000 

To appreciate what these increases 
would mean in individual cases, it is 
only necessary for most station men 
and station representatives to multi- 
ply their 1958 billings by three in 
order to estimate their 1963 goal 
potentials. 

Such figures, staggering as they 
may sound, are what sponsor honestly 
believes is possible for your national 
spot radio business by 1963. 



Yet, of course, such goals are not 
going to be reached automatical!) or 
mereh by wishing for them. (See 
Sponsor Speaks page 84. ) 

They are not going to be reached, 
we repeat, if spot radio continues in 
the direction it has been traveling. 

The real value of goals in any busi- 
ness operation is as a measure of 
achievement and a continuing chal- 
lenge, sponsor believes that, in Leo 
Burnetts phrase, one should "reach 
for the stars." 

Spot radio, in our opinion, has 
been reaching for the mud too long. 

In subsequent articles dealing with 
the $500 Million Plan we will explore 
at considerable lengths those factors 
which, properly organized and sold, 
gives spot radio far more vitality and 
health than it has ever displayed. 

Among the topics we shall cover 
are spot radio's community strength 
and coverage, its strong appeal to 
advertisers who must sell locally in 
local markets, its proven record of 
success in every type of industry. 

On the negative side, we shall deal 
with such major problems as spot 
radios rate confusion, its unsolved 
research questions, its rate card mess, 



its overwhelming bookkeeping end 
detail, even its price wars. And we 
will suggest ways to correct these 
evils. 

Next week, however, before getting 
into such specific items, we propose 
to outline a new basic business strat- 
egy for the spot radio industry. 

This is where all sound business 
planning begins. 

Schedule of articles 
SPONSOR'S $500 Million Plan 
will be covered in successive 
issues of the magazine on these 
dates: 

Step One: Sales goals for spot 
radio (discussed in this issue) 
Step Two: Basic business strat- 
egy (31 January I 
Step Three: Putting spot ra- 
dio's house in order ( 7 Febru- 
ary) 
Step Four: Building spot ra- 
dios strength 1 14 Februar) I 
Step Five: Selling spot radio's 
image and power (21 Febru- 
ary) 
In addition to these articles already 
planned. SPONSOR may schedule addi- 
tional topics, bearing on the $500 
Million Spot Radio Program, if the) 
develop. ^ 



llillll Illllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIII;!IIIII<I|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIH Illllllllllll! Illllllllllllllllllll I 



Radio needs a new set of procedural meth- 
ods. Presently there must be three thousand sets 
of availability patterns, market claims, coverage 
information, and general station presentations. 
There is an urgent need to settle the conflicting 
and confusing audience measurement problem. 

Individual radio stations need to develop well- 
defined station personalities. Here we are re- 
ferring to a -till ion-" character — not to the sta- 
tion's 'characters.' 

Finally, radio should hammer away for all 
its worth against the current agency trend of hit- 
and-rnn campaigns. The very nature of radio . . . 
yea, even advertising, demands consistency. 

Francis M. Fitzgerald, pres. 
WCIV, Charlotte, N. C. 

"We're wondering if the Image of Radio has 
changed as much as some people think. There 
were good and bad stations in 1939 and 1949, 
just as in 1959. But in those days we talked 
about a station's Personality, rather than Cor- 



porate Image. The difference between good and 
bad, as always, is a sense of Show Business. 

Here at our station, the big word is Service 
raiher than Format. We do not consider our 
radio the unappreciated step-child of television. 
To be sure, we've stepped up our timing, we've 
increased our promotion. But we still play to 
the small towns, villages and farms of this area, 
as do the flock of CBS Washboard Dramas in 
the afternoon. We're not sure we're right but 
our ratings and profits are still in first place. 

To summarize, we try to be a Good Neighbor 
in this area. No one has to remind us that Tele- 
vision is hurting our audience. But we've 
learned that Radio can be more friendly, inti- 
mate and personal than television, just as ihe 
Pulaski Weekly Leader is bound to be more 
interesting (to the folks in Pulaski) than the 
New York Times." 

Cen. Manager of a CBS Station 
Midwest Area 



JI!!lllll!l!!li;i!!ll!!llllll!lllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIM 
SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



lll!!llllllll!lll!!illllllll!lllllll!lll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



35 



THEY HITCH THEIR 
COUPONING TO TV 

^ Lever, Texaco, Columbia Records get more mile- 
age out of coupon campaigns via air-media tie-ins 

^ Here's how percentage of returns can be increased 
markedly by consistent reminders, demonstrations 



COLUMBIA 




am Coupon is worth $1 1 

Am Record or Album listed 

^L\ l< TO DEALER: Presentatio 

this coupon, together with your 
for any one of the albums from the 
HHiH New Release list published as part 

of the advertisement in which this 
X ^^^^B coupon appears, to your authorized 
1^^ f In] Columbia distributor before 
^T^ I "»P I November 15, 1958, entities you to 
^T ^^^^B a special Anniversary price for such 
album Coupon void it taxed, pro- 
hibited, or restricted by law Good 
only in the U S A. Cash value 1/20 
of 1 cent. Columbia Records. 799 
7th Ave . H. Y. C. Offer expires 
midnight October 31, 1958 
oh suggested list price 



Tv-magazine combination for Columbia Records provided visual urge to clip coupons. 
Below II to r) animators Howard Henkin, Ronald Fritz, Mc-E's a.e., Bob Mclntyre, 
producer Chet Gierlach, writer Sam Willson make sure all legal kinks are ironed out 




A% coupon — in a certain sense — 
is a written understanding between 
an advertiser and a prospect. Because 
of this rapproachement, couponing 
has been a potent method of increas- 
ing distribution, building traffic, and 
introducing new products. But, by 
the same token, it's been a headache 
to the air media — they have the dis- 
advantage of not being able to supply 
the public with the necessary sta- 
tionery for response. 

On the other hand, radio/tv aren't 
losing out entirely. They've found 
a niche for themselves as cheerleaders 
for a coupon campaign. In other 
words, they can supply additional 
leverage, the urge-to-action. 

Right now a final chapter on one 
such example is coming to a close: 

1. Tv-Magazine Combination 

McCann-Erickson split a $250,000 
budget equally between tv and maga- 
zines for Columbia Records' 1958 
fall promotion. Fall sales account 
for 60-659r of yearly volume, album 
production was up 25% and the re- 
cession had taken a big bite into 
sales. A lot was riding on the suc- 
cess of the promotion. 

The plan was to distribute about 
15 million coupons via magazines 
and, on a co-op basis, in dealer news- 
paper ads. The coupon offered 46 
fall album releases at a dollar off — 
believed to be the first couponing by 
a record company. 

An animated cartoon character 
was used to dramatize how to get the 
coupon via magazines. Additional- 
ly, the character was designed to 
transmit a corporate image beyond 
the couponing itself. 

A continuing character, "Cecil the 
Butler," had been used in two prior 
promotions. Account executive Bob 
Mclntvre defines him as a sort of 
"square hipster" linking an English 
accent with phrases like "crazy, 
man," tying a class imagre to hard 
sell — all combinations needed to sell 
records, according to Mclntyre. 

Problems in making the commer- 
cial stemmed from the showing of 
the coupon effectively. Recognition, 
but little more, could be achieved 
with a blow-up. so the salient point — 
"Save $1 off suggested list price"- 
was popped on over Cecil's head as 
he pointed to the coupon. 

A legal difficulty prohibited anv 
copy or action depicting the coupon 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



being torn out of a magazine (under 
a Federal law. "defacing" more than 
30% of a magazine page cannot be 
suggested). So Howard Henkin ol 
HFH Productions "animated it" out 
of a magazine, thus avoiding the 
necessity of saying "tear out," but at 
the same time preserving the key 
copy point, "This page is worth $10." 
(It contained 10 couponsl. 

The commercials were played on 
the CBS o&o's in seven markets: 
New York. Philadelphia, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Hartford, and Milwau- 
kee. These seven markets account for 
65-70% of Columbia's total business. 

Success of the promotion is indi- 
cated by the fact that Columbia end- 
ed the year with its record sales up 
14' r over 1957. While this is under 
the 18% hike of '57 over '56, Colum- 
bia considers it very respectable in 
view of the recession. 

Problems which Columbia wasn't 
able to overcome were: (1) sale of 
the records by discount houses at 10c 
or 15c under the coupon price, and 
t 2 1 supermarket bartering, where 
coupons clipped from magazines are 
exchanged for $1 off the food bill. 

The first problem is indigenous to 
the record business, the second ap- 
plies in any couponing operation 
where the couponing involves a 
counter transaction. 

2. Tv-Direct Mail 
Here's another approach: 
Lever Bros, last fall tied a tv per- 
sonality, a theme, and a contest to 
mail-box couponing. These elements, 
plus brand name, were combined in 
the contest title: "The Lever Price Is 
Right Family Contest." 

Actually, it was 12 contests — one 
for each of the products involved in 
the couponing. The problem was to 
display all 12 in a 60-second film. 
ll< ng with a printed sheet with prizes 
pit lured. 

The film, with Bill Cullen, ran on 
all Lever tv properties from 11 Sep- 
tember to 4 October, timed with the 
arrival of envelopes with the prize 
sheet and one coupon for each prod- 
uct (total number varied with dis- 
tribution in different parts of the 
country) . 

The Price fs Right title tied into 
the contest directly: entrants had to 
guess the price of the nine prizes 
pictured. Entry fee: a box top from 




Point-of-sale coupon, used by Texaco as traffic-builder, is thoroughly explained to 
consumers via special radio/tv commercials; tv permitted enactment of entire procedure 






one of the 12 couponed products. 
Since every product keyed a separate 
contest, contestants could enter mul- 
tiple times. It was possible to point 
this up on tv. 

The prize tally was formidable: 
Each (No. 1) winner got a Mercury 
station wagon and all the other eight 
prizes. Each of the other eight win- 
ners in each of the 12 contests got a 
prize each. 

Tv not only gave the contest the 
tremendous exposure it needed over 
the four-week period, but kept up 
the excitement. Displaying the prod- 
ucts on tv (and dramatizing the 
dozen separate contests) heightened 
brand awareness as couponing with- 
out this support could not do, say 
Lever admen. 

3. Tv-Sunday Supplements 
Lever also was one of the early 
users of tv in combination with a 
couponing medium, recalls Erwin 
Wasev, Ruthrauff & Ryan merchan- 
dising director Charles F. Bennett. 
Product manager at Lever in 1952, he 
remembers that two weeks of net- 
work tv, 10 announcements per week, 
resulted in a 5.7% redemption on a 
Sundav supplement offer for Sprj 
when 4% was expected. (Four per 
cent is considered the average re- 
demption for this type couponing.) 
"By adding tv." he note-, "you (\m 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



pick up more prospects for a direct 
sampling of your product, which 
straight couponing without support 
cannot always reach. This carries 
the promotion beyond your regular 
user group looking for a bargain."' 

4. Other Combinations 

Among other couponing methods, 
in-pack couponing (which requires 
purchase of the product to obtain 
the coupon) is an on-and-off favorite. 
While a 15-20' \ redemption can be 
expected on this type of offer, sup- 
port is advisable to insure success. 

Bennett recalls a 1954 in-pack 
couponing of Spry which brought 
19% redemptions everywhere except 
in tv-supported markets. Here the 
redemption average was 37' < . "\\ itb 
tv you not only can tell more people 
about a coupon." he says, "but you 
can hit them again if they've passed 
it up so that the\ '11 do something the 
next time they see it. 

"Tv more often than not is at the 
top in percentage of return- on most 
premiums." he notes. "It stands to 
reason that this power benefits am 
promotion. 

Texaco provides an example of 
couponing as a means of bringing 
the consumer to point of purchase. 

Last spring, it tied the first traffic- 
building promotion in its national 
I Please turn to page <>1 i 



37 



CM* 



WESTERN UNION 



H tt»B134 RX PD=FAX MLWAUKEE *tS 16 W28W-0 ~ 
v*«H#» *0.*tLLIIk SPOWSOR* W *>I6 Ml II 

40 EAST *$ ST *YK= 

*ARTI DAY SALES FIGURES JANUARY 1ST TKR0U6H JARUARY 
15Th„ WAMT010C 0, OSMKOSH 35» APPLE TOh 8^5, 6ILLETT 
135» 6PEEN BAY 690, MEfcttmEE 60, FOND DU LAC 0, 
STEVERS POIWT *>, HAUSAU JO, NORWAY 0, SHEBOYGAA SO, 
TOTALING 159> CS. MILWAUKEE SALES SAME PERIOD 311 CASES* 
OTTO L KUEHR COM BOWEfU i^lf 

■fAETl 1 ( 15 ZERO 35 265 135 890 60 ZERO 90 30 ZERO JO 
1593 CS 311" 



TV TEST SALES HIT PEAK 



^^ales of Parti-Day Toppings in the 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, tv test area 
took a sharp spurt upward following 
the seasonal lag of the Christmas-New 
Year's holidays. 

The wire above from Marvin L. 
Bower, merchandise manager for 
food broker Otto L. Kuehn Co., shows 
the highest case sales to wholesalers 
for any 15-day period since Parti- 
Day began its test of day tv spots 
over WBAY-TV, Green Bay on 15 
October. 

Sales of 1,595 cases for the 1-15 
January period give Parti-Day a total 
of 5,435 cases for the first three 
months of the test. 

These figures compare with sales of 
3.145 cases for the entire six-month 
period before Parti-Day began run- 
ning its 10 one-minute spots a week 
schedule. 

Even more significant, it empha- 
sizes again the power of day televi- 
sion to build consumer acceptance, 
for wholesale shipments are now re- 
flecting retail movement, rather than 



merely store stocking. 

One interesting wholesale pattern 
that may or may not have signifi- 
cance: sales of Parti-Day to whole- 
salers in the first half of each calen- 
dar month are running at more than 
three times the rate of second half 
orders. This has been true for each 
monthly period since the test began. 
"Second half" orders for Parti-Day 
total 1,300 cases. "First half" orders 
total 4,135. 

Next week, the D'Arcy agency re- 
search report on a Green Bay con- 
sumer study will be reported in spon- 
sor along with a complete sales break- 
down for the first half of this 26-week 
test run. ^ 



The testjin a nutshell: Product: 

Parti-Day Toppings. Market: 80-mile 
area around Green Bay, Wis. Media: 
Day tv spots only. Schedule: 10 
spots weekly. Length : 26 weeks from 
15 Oct. Commercials: Live, one-min- 
ute. Budget: $9,980 complete. 




SALES BOX SCORE 

15 Oct.-15 Nov. 2,030 cases 
15 Nov.-15 Dec. 1,460 cases 
15 Dec-15 Jan. 1,945 cases 



Shipments to wholesalers in Green 
Bay, Wis. area since start of tv test 



38 



K&E's Bud 



^ K&E research chief 
would like regular figures on 
the percent of product's mar- 
ket reached by programing 



^%gency researchers are commonly 
painted as the great defenders of rat- 
ings. It's a fact, though, they're as 
aware as anybody — probably more 
so — that just counting heads and 
looking for big numbers can often be 
a pure waste of time. 

It's dangerous to generalize about 
research or researchers but it's pretty 
safe to say that they're just inter- 
ested in "who" as "how many." 

Example: Sitting in this corner is 
Bud Sherak, vice president and re- 
search director of K&E. He's talking 
about (1) a show that once starred 
the well-known pediatrician, Dr. 
Sprock, (21 the sponsor, Beech-Nut 
baby foods and (3) a common 
marketing problem. 

"Some ratings are just useless," he 
was saying. "After all, what does it 
mean when you compare the ratings 
Dr. Spock got with some other net- 
work tv shows? But presumably 
everybody who tuned into that show 
could be a prospect for baby foods. 
Suppose he was just part of a show 
that appealed to various groups of 
people and the audience was five 
times as big? Is a baby food spon- 
sor doing any better with that kind 
of audience?" 

He would rather reach, Sherak said, 
20% of the people who account for 
30% of the sales than 30% of the 
people who account for 20% of the 
sales. He added, "It's not enough to 
know you're reaching prospects. You 
also want to know what percent of 
the total market you're reaching with 
your advertising." 

Sherak feels that the job of provid- 
ing continuing data on what percent 
of the market for various products is 
reached by a commercial (or ad) 
represents one of the major chal-j 
lenges of media research. 

He listed two other areas where 
more research, in broadcasting as 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 19591 ' 



Sherak sees 3 research headaches 



»vell as print, is sorely needed. 

One area involves basic research 
:o measure exposure to advertising. 
The other is measurement of the ef- 
: ect of the editorial "environment" 
)f media on advertising. 

Measuring exposure to advertising 

no simple matter, Sherak said. "But 
nost people don't realize that even 
3efore you get to the measurement 
jroblem, you've got a problem of de- 
ining what you're measuring. Defi- 
lition and measurement are two dif- 
ferent things. 
""Let me illustrate. How do you de- 
ine exposure? There's obviously 
nore than one way. You could say 
hat if any part of the message left a 
nark on the nervous system — that 
constitutes exposure. Or, you could 
say that anybody in the same room 
is the set while the ad is tuned is 
:xposed to the message. 

Now we get to the problem of 
neasurement. In finding out how 
many people are in the same room, 
ve can use a diary or we can ask 
)eople by phone or in person. In 
;inding out what part of the message 
left a mark on the consumer we are 
aced with other problems. Should 
ve ask the person what he remem- 
bers of the ad? Is memory enough? 
Should we use the recognition method, 
is we do in print media? If we do 
jse it, how do you show a person all 
;he commercials he may have seen 
on tv? These are just some of the 
aroblems." 

Measuring the effect of the edi- 

f)rial environment, explained Sherak, 
as to do with the ability of a medi- 
m itself to build acceptance for the 
roduct or to put the audience in the 
roper frame of mind for the com- 
y |;Tiercial or ad. "Will a western help 
-HI a particular product? Will a 
& utuation comedy hurt the effective- 






ness of the message?" 



K&E is working actively on this 
area now. Sherak noted that some 
work has been done, but not system- 
atically and he feels that most of the 
research has been poor. If conducted 
aroperly and if done over a period of 
time, Sherak predicted, eventually 
(Please turn to page 61) 




K&E research director Bud Sherak says agency has done comprehensive studies measur- 
ing ability of tv programs to build product acceptance, enhance commercial message 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



39 




. ^k * . ♦ * J 



** -V* 



**es^ 




Local patterns are traced by (1-r) Alcoa promotion mgr. Jay Sharp, ad mgr, Torrence ("Tod"') Hunt, promotion supervisor Dale Worcester 



Alcoa wraps up a big radio bundle 



^ Aluminum firm uses complex pattern of net, regional 
and spot to promote customers and customers' customers 

^ Seven big promotions on a seasonal schedule will 
link Alcoa to manufacturers, manufacturers to dealers 



I he in-depth use of radio to solve 
marketing problems gets a new di- 
mension from the detailed, ingenious 
and complex application Alcoa is giv- 
ing it in 1959. 

Alcoa and its agency, Fuller & 
Smith & Ross, are applying radio to 
requirements ranging from corporate 
image through customer identifica- 
tion to dealer listing. 

Alcoa's chief marketing problem 
stems from the fact that it manufac- 
tures few consumer products. It is 
chiefly a supplier. Its customers 
manufacture everything from alumi- 
num nails to marine boats. Alcoa's 
job is to help its customers sell their 

40 



products. And the problems are 
many: 

Stimulating sale of its customers' 
wares at the dealer level is the chief 
one, according to Alcoa promotion 
manager Jay M. Sharp. "It's not 
enough to whip up enthusiasm and 
create awareness among dealers. The 
important thing is to give dealers a 
peg to hang their own advertising 
on." 

Thus, the consumer must be led 
through three steps: 

• An awareness of the trade name 
Alcoa 

• Its application to a manufactur- 
er's product 



• Knowledge of where this prod 
uct can be purchased 

The 1-2-3 nature of this operatior 
is complicated by several factors: 

From the customer's standpoint 
there is his own advertising image 
to what extent it can be linked t( 
Alcoa's promotions, the seasona 
problems to all advertisers in certah 
categories, the regional problems of « 
few. 

To the dealer, cost is uppermost 
He must be able to see the econom; 
plus sales advantages of an advertis 
ing tie-in. 

Jerry Arthur, media v. p. at Fulle 
& Smith & Ross says flatly that radi 
is the only medium that would giv 
the plan the extreme flexibility i 
needs. He explains that basic to th 
campaign are seven promotions 
year. Here are some of the radi 
patterns that will be used: 

• Network plus local. A networi 
buy concentrating on corporate in( 
age and customer products with loc<; 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 19 



J 



dealer cut-ins, pinpointing outlets. 

• Regional network plus local. Re- 
gional feeding of five separate com- 
mercials at the same time in a net- 
work show to accommodate regional 

ustomers, again followed by local 
dealer cut-ins. 

• National spot plus local. Na- 
tional spot will be used to accommo- 
date manufacturers who (1) are dis- 
tinctly regional or local, (2) have a 
local selling problem, (3) are in a 
category not covered by the seven 
big promotions (major appliances is 
one of these). In all cases, local deal- 
er cut-ins will follow the spot an- 
nouncements. 

The seven promotions are: 

(1) Boats, motors and accessories. 
January-February. Coverage of the 
New York Boat Show on NBC's 
Monitor 16-17 January included 25 
five-minute segments for Alcoa. These 
segments were four minutes of fea- 
ture interview with boating experts 
and a one-minute commercial for an 
Alcoa customer (ranging from mak- 
ers of yachts to rivets). After each 
segment, the network pulled away for 
one minute cut-ins by local dealers — 
marine boat dealers, boating suppli- 
ers, boating accessory dealers, depart- 
ment stores. The whole thing was 
preceded Fridays night, 16 January, 
by a 55-minute network kick-off with 
Guy Lombardo's orchestra. Dealers 
did not tie into this. When the Chi- 
cago boat show gets the same treat- 
ment 7-8 February it will be minus 
the network kick-off. Boats will get 
another push in May. 

(2) Residential Building. March- 
April. An eight-week promotion using 
'10 Monitor segments per weekend for 
a total of 80. This time the four- 
minute "vignettes" will include inter- 
rviews with builders, tract owners, 
building association people at build- 
ing developments. A commercial for 
•a building materials customer of Al- 
coa follows each interview. Local 
dealer cut-ins will be by such seem- 
ingly unlikely spot advertisers as 

lumber yards, building supply houses, 
• dealers in storm windows, sliding 
ulass doors, gutters and downspouts, 
hardware stores. This promotion 
gets another three-months consumer 
'push beginning in Jul\. 

3) Cookware. March-April, Octo- 
! ber-December. Dealers include hard- 
jware, department and variety stores. 
(4) Summer furniture. April-June. 






SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



A strong bid for "patio shop'" tie-in> 
will be made for this one as well as 
furniture and department stores. 

(5) Sporting Goods. May -June 

(6) Hardware. September-October 

(7) Christmas. The whole thing 
comes to a boil in December with all 
categories except boats and building 
getting a ride, in addition to a spe- 
cial giftware promotion. 

What sort of coverage will these 
last five categories get? 

Alcoa now has its 17 field promo- 
tion managers making the rounds 
of its customers. The big question 
they're asking is what coverage is 
best suited to their needs — network, 
regional network or spot. 

Where network gets the nod, pro- 
motions similar to the boating push 
will be used, or a personality or 
husband-and-wife team over several 
weeks. Where a "regional network" 
buy is indicated, Alcoa will utilize a 
five-area network split to insert dif- 



ferent customer plugs in each area. 

"The personality or husband-and- 
wife team merely record five com- 
mercials instead of one," explains 
F&S&R senior v. p. and radio/tv direc- 
tor Art Duram. "By regional feed- 
ing, all five can be played simul- 
taneously. 

Where spot will be used is with 
categories of manufacturers that are 
largely regional, says Alcoa ad mana- 
ger Torrence M. ("Tod") Hunt. "It 
will be another week before reports 
start coming back to us on customer 
preferences," he says, "but it's safe 
to forecast that the greatest demand 
will be for spot, simply because there 
are more regional than national 
manufacturers." 

Another reason : "The cookware 
promotion clearly calls for selling to 
a woman's audience," Hunt points 
out. "the sporting goods promotion to 
a male audience. Spot may be in- 
( Please turn to page 62) 



|IHIIIIII!!!l!llllll!llllllllli!ll!llllllllllllll!!lll!lll!l!IH 

HOW ALCOA TAILORS COVERAGE 



NETWORK 



+ 



LOCAL 



I 



customer 



deal* 



NETWORK SEGMENTS promoting an Alcoa customer are followed by 
local dealer cut-ins. Network participations, shows also fit into pattern 



REGIONAL 
NETWORK 


+ 


LOCAL 




i 








1 






customer 




dealer 





REGIONAL FEEDING of commercials makes it possible to service five 
different customers in their own manufacturing areas during one com- 
mercial break on the network. Dealer cut-ins follow, pinpointing outlets 



NATIONAL 
SPOT 



1 



LOCAL 



T 



customer 



dealer 



NATIONAL SPOT BUYS promoting distinctly localized manufacturers 
ior thvse with selling problems) are also followed by local dealer spots 

PlIlllllillllllllllllllllllllilllllilllllllllllllllllllllM 



41 



More tv 

weathercasts 
using radar 




Trained meterologist Warren Culbertson presents the weather 



^ Stations finding 5 to 15 minute weather-by-radar 
programs fascinate viewers— and line up the advertisers 

^ But, equipment is expensive and "weathermen" 
must have special training to interpret the scope display 



I he probing eye of radar has 
found new employment. With appeal 
based firmly on the American fas- 
cination with scientific gadgets, 
"weather-in-the-making" programs 
are now sparking new interest from 
viewers of all ages. 

So successful are these new 
weathercasts in attracting both 
viewers and sponsors, that over a 
dozen stations so far have invested 
in weather radar. Since equipment, 
fittings, and installation can easily 
cost $25,000, the stations are evi- 
dently discovering excellent reasons 
to justify the expenditure. 

Collins Radio, manufacturers of 
radar equipment for commercial air- 
lines, at last report had equipped 
nine stations. They have found in- 
terest in weather radar highest in the 
Midwest and Gulf Coast region sta- 
tions. Some coastal stations are now 
reported next in line. Bendix and 
RCA have a number of installations 
in progress. 

As employed by the majority of 
stations, a slide projector is used to 
superimpose a map over the radar 
scope televised image. The geo- 
graphic map slides are changed to 



match the area covered at the time 
by the radar sweep. In this way, the 
tv viewer sees the exact geographic 
location of the weather as it moves in. 

To interpret what is shown on the 
radar screen to the viewing public 
takes special training. One station, 
WBKB, Chicago, has solved this 
problem by employing a trained 
meteorologist. 

Speaking of the WBKB operation, 
Sterling C. Quinlan, ABC v.p., says 
"The visual advantages of the Weath- 
er by Radar technique are obvious. 
If it consists of rain, snow, hail, sleet 
or large fronts containing cyclones 
or tornadoes, one can plot the very ' 
course of the weather and a storm, 
and not have to depend on periodic 
reports of weather movements". 

Warren Culbertson, the WBKB 
staff meteorologist, is a professional 
member of the American Meteor- 
ological Society, with eight years 
of weather telecasting background. 
Though radar is the principal attrac- 
tion, Culbertson supplements this in 
his weather forecasts with instru- 
ments to report and record current 
wind direction and velocity, baro- 
metric pressure, temperature, rain- 



fall, relative humidity and other data. 

Though some tv stations are re- 
ported using 15 minute weathercasts, 
ABC's Quinlan considers this too 
long and prefers "frequent, short 
shots as the ideal pattern." WBKB 
now does 17 five-minute shots a 
week, six days per week. Typical of 
other tv stations now using radar 
weather programs, WBKB reports, 
"Show is sold out. Unsponsored days 
are filled with spots." 

Like WBKB, most tv weather 
radar is being operated at 5,400 mc. 
But one station. WBAL in Baltimore, 
will use 9,375 mc. 

The installation at WBKB typifies 
in general the equipment used by 
other stations such as WBRZ, Baton 
Rouge; WMT, Cedar rapids; WWIL, 
Ft. Lauderdale; WFAA, Dallas; 
WLWT, Cincinnati. Design of the 
basic unit is predicted on standard 
aircraft weather radar. 

In Chicago, WBKB has installed 
its search antenna on an outrigger 
built on the station's 567-ft. tower. 
The 30-inch diameter rotating radar 
dish sends out electronic waves which 
travel up to 150 miles and return 
when reflected by masses. 

Need for a trained observer is 
underlined by some of WBKB's ex\ 
periences. They have found that 
radar not only picks up weather 
fronts, but such dissimilar objects as; 
flocks of birds in the sky. smoke 
tails from the Gary industrial ared 
south of Chicago, airplanes, clouds, 
even boats on Lake Michigan. 



42 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1955 



SPONSOR INDEX 



Issued every (> months 



JULY THROUGH DECEMBER 1958 



2ND HALF VOLUME 12 



Twice each vear SPONSOR publishes a six-month index 
of articles. This new index covering the final six months 
of 1958 is similar to the one you have been using for the 
first half of 1958. There are the same headings and sub- 
headings in alphabetical order. Under the case histories 
(there are some new categories and some have been left 



ADVERTISERS 



General 



Hn\\ tv"s program "mess" hits sponsors 

U recession cutting '58 ad budgets? 

The hard yell sell (McMillin) ... 

Its Detroit running scared? 

j\laska"s potential for advertisers 

The majors lead '58's spot radio boom 

)ld stalwarts plan biggest tv spot increases 

\r» advertisers, renewals hint record '58 for film 
,5-conscious clients probe multi-agency set-ups _ 

I\ -trategy causes '"silent revolution" 

•mx ways clients evaluate agencies 

'Do dentists have a case against tv? 
A preview of new fall tv commercials 

R hat shapes clients' views of agencies? 

Consider French's mashed potato (McMillin) 
Local rate muddle at boiling point 

\\li\ advertisers cross plug on net tv 

low major account changes affect air strategy 

|P&C creativeness (McMillin) 

'Private brand" wars spur spot _ 

5pol tv spending: a soap story 

hiu 6 industries will use spot radio this fall 

1 < > I > 100 national advertisers: first half, '58 

|Why the biggest aren't the best (McMillin) 

\\alanche of new products changes ad tactics 

poaps washing out print for more air 

["ootball sponsors spend 113 million on radio/tv 
nets this season 

Tea spots win 1st, 2nd places in radio vote 

[CLM shoots for real Dutch flavor 

Advertisers stand in line for minute spots.— 

rhe chemicals flock to television 

S'hy big industry is moving into tv 

Advertisers spending $1,500,000,000 demand more 
i reative ad work in '59 „ 
amps for the eyes of oilmen (McMillin) 

I a< -how me boys" move into tv 

["op 100 advertisers in spot tv: 3rd quarter 1958 
-iii - amazing Christmas baby 

; pot radio's 51 leaders in 1958 



12 July 

12 July 
19 July 
19 July 

19 July 
26 July 
26 July 
26 July 

26 July 
2 Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
16 Aug. 
16 Aug. 
16 Aug. 
23 Aug. 
30 Aug. 
30 Aug. 
30 Aug. 
30 Aug. 
30 Aug. 

13 Sept. 

20 Sept. 

27 Sept. 



p. 29 
p. 38 
p. 18 
p. 33 
p. 38 
p. 28 
p. 30 
p. 30 
p. 36 
p. 23 
p. 30 
p. 29 
p. 36 
p. 38 
p. 18 
p. 27 
p. 31 
p. 34 
p. 12 
p. 29 
p. 32 
p. 38 
p. 93 
p. 26 
p. 34 
p. 33 



27 Sept. p. 43 

4 Oct. p. 40 

18 Oct. p. 46 

25 Oct. p. 31 

25 Oct. p. 38 

15 Nov. p. 31 

22 Nov. p. 31 

6 Dec. p. 10 

6 Dec. p. 29 

13 Dec. p. 37 

20 Dec. p. 23 

27 Dec. p. 29 



I 

, Vrsonalitics 

■■Jewsmaker of week: Procter Coffin, adv. sis. mgr., 
NECCO _ 2 Aug. 



out. Here are the major headings in alphabetical order: 
Advertisers, Advertising ageneies, Broadcast in- 
dustry, Commercials, Film, Foreign, Marketing, 
Merchandising-promotion-publicity, Product case 
histories, Radio, Ratings, Representatives, Research- 
surveys, Special Issues-sections, Television. 



Newsmaker of week: Patrick J. Frawley, Jr., pres., 

Schick Safety Razor Co. 9 Aug. p. 4 

Newsmaker of week: Dr. James Hillier. v. p., RCA 

Labs - 1 Nov. p. 6 

Newsmaker of week: Henry Schachte, adv. v. p.. 

Lever Bros 22 Nov. p. 6 

Newsmaker of the week: Harold F. Temple, pres., 

P. Lorillard 29 Nov. p. 6 

Edsel's Fox tackles the year's toughest comeback 

job 20 Dec. p. 34 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 



General 



He can't quit selling (feature) 

Dan Seymour: guiding genius of JWT's air strategy 
Tips on planning commercials (Rollo Hunter. 
EWR&R) 

Spot radio's top 20 agencies in '57 

$-conscious clients probe multi-agency set-ups 

Y&R's Rod Erickson moves to Warner 

What do clients think of your agency? .... 

What attracts top agency personnel? 

What shapes clients' views of agencies? . 
A new way to measure the cost of servicing ac- 
counts (Norman Cohen, Emil Mogul) 
Local rate muddle at boiling point 
How major account changes affect air strategy 

How will agencies use NCS #3? 

Avalanche of new products changes ad tactics 

The BBDO marketing set-up grows 

Where's Madison Avenue gone to? 

North Agency's radio/tv emphasis boosts it to the 

top - - 

Burnett, Ogilvy win honors for tea campaigns 

What tv and radio have done to N. W. A\er 

Y&R's White Owl Cigar radio drive 

How agencies pep up tv selling with popular local 

personalities 
The eggheads and us ( McMillin) 
B&B's "cactus" theme for Schick 
Sponsor A«ks: What is your agency doing to de- 
velop new talent.'' 
Noble-Dury builds solidly on air 
C&W's \ideotown is in love again with morning 

radio 

p. 4 ^&R dig- for fuels "beyond ratings" 



5 Julv 
19 Julv 



36 
30 



19 July p. 34 
26 July p. 28 
26 July p. 36 

26 July p. 38 
2 Aug. p. 30 
9 Aug. p. 33 
9 Aug. p. 38 

9 Aug. p. 42 
16 Aug. p. 29 
23 Aug. p. 34 
23 Aug. p. 44 

20 Sept. p. 34 
20 Sept. p. 38 

27 Sept. p. K) 

4 Oct. p. 32 

4 Oct. p. 40 

11 Oct. p. 35 

18 Oct. p. 35 

18 Oct. p. 48 

8 Nov. p. 10 
8 Nov. p. 33 



8 Nov. 
22 Nov. 



p. 54 
p. 34 



22 Nov. p. M 
13 Dee. p. 32 



PONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



43 



Vgenc) mergers make news in 1958 27 Dec. p. 26 

Top 50 air agencies with net and spot breakdowns 27 Dec. p. 27 

Timebuying 

Sponsor Asks: Are rating services keeping pace 

with timebuyers? ._ 5 July p. 60 

Syndicator attacks "formula"' timebuyers 12 July p. 34 

Sponsor Asks: What criteria do timebuyers ignore? 26 July p. 42 

What a timebuyer can do to get ahead 6 Sept. p. 34 

15 keys to better timebuyer-timeseller relationships 13 Sept. p. 36 

The timebuyer who struck out (feature) 27 Sept. p. 39 

How timebuyers get from here to there _ ._ 27 Sept. p. 42 

Portrait of a big-time buyer: Mc-E's Sal Agovino ... 1 Nov. p. 34 

Pied Piper of timebuying: fads for '59 29 Nov. p. 39 

Things I got for Christmas (feature) 27 Dec. p. 30 

Personalities 

Newsmaker of week: Robert M. Ganger, chmn. of 

board, D'Arcy _ 30 Aug. p. 4 

Newsmaker of week: Robert L. Foreman, creative 

services head, BBDO 6 Sept. p. 4 

Newsmaker of week: Paul Foley, chmn. adm. coun- 
cil, McCann-Erickson ! ._ 13 Sept. p. 6 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Lusk, pres., Benton 

& Bowles ._ 4 Oct. p. 6 

Newsmaker of week: Ben Gedalecia, v.p., research 

dir., BBDO ..... 18 Oct. p. 6 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Newell, pres., C&W 8 Nov. p. 6 

Return of the prodigal adman: OBM's Ev Meade... 8 Nov. p. 42 

Newsmaker of week: Joseph M. Greeley, v.p. mar- 
keting, member board of dir., Leo Burnett 20 Dec. p. 4 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY 

General 

Banking copy goes human (McMillin) 5 July p. 27 

The hard yell sell (McMillin) 19 July p. 18 

How program specialists help spot 19 July p. 27 

Alaska's potential for advertisers _ ~ 19 July p. 38 

Critique on the critics (Csida) 26 July p. 22 

How radio/tv can improve community relations 

(Hanque Ringgold) 26 July p. 38 

Blair report on local radio programing.. 26 July p. 51 

Local rate muddle at boiling point 16 Aug. p. 27 

The Leo Burnett air media strategy 16 Aug. p. 29 

How will agencies use NCS #3? 23 Aug. p. 44 

Sponsor Asks: What are your goals for the season 

ahead? _ 23 Aug. p. 48 

Sponsor Asks: How will independents program 

against net competition? 6 Sept. p. 54 

Sponsor Asks: Should stations under joint owner- 
ship (am & fm cross plug? 13 Sept. p. 72 

Short wave: Quick route to sales in Latin America 20 Sept. p. 40 

How soap's big three rank in tv and radio 27 Sept. p. 33 

Where's Madison Avenue gone to? 27 Sept. p. 40 

Football sponsors spend 113 million on radio/tv 

nets this year — _. 27 Sept. p. 54 

Sponsor Asks: What is the place of the regional 

network in today's radio? 27 Sept. p. 43 

A net show, a tarnished idol (Csida) . 4 Oct. p. 12 

Stereo cues two-way air media buys 4 Oct. p. 35 

sponsor Quiz: Abbreviates for bright execs 4 Oct. p. 39 

Radioactive weather: boom on coast, backfire in 

Manhattan _ 4 Oct. p. 42 

What tv and radio have done to N. W. Ayer 11 Oct. p. 35 

Machine tactics get out the WOW listener vote 11 Oct. p. 47 

End of an era (Csida) 18 Oct. p. 20 

Displays sell to the "lonely shopper" 18 Oct. p. 40 

Punch 'em up on election night 18 Oct. p. 47 

Ad alley: A couple of book reviews (Csida) 1 Nov. p. 12 

The eggheads and us (McMillin) ._... 8 Nov. p. 10 

What's behind the liquor controversy? 8 Nov. p. 36 



New York trip: the hectic day of a visiting fireman 

What the CBS radio "consolidation" is all about .. 

Run your station better, says adman _ 

Rock won in N. Y. state; they say Pat Weaver 
done it (McMillin) 

Creativity: the keynote of the ANA convention 

You can't win 'em all (Csida) 

How Fortune tipped off the anti-tv party line 

Station reverses itself, won't accept liquor ads 

Sponsor Asks: What did you get out of this year's 
BPA convention ? 

Tv's reply to print (Csida) 

Radio: a problem-beset medium fights back: Part I 

CBS drops its "must buy" policy 

Memories of a Christmas broadcast (McMillin) 

Radio wallops newspapers in new grocery shop- 
ping study 

Spot radio problems: Part II. .__. 

Sponsor Asks: Do the tv critics hurt television? 

Music hath power, sales power! (Csida) 

It was a rough year: 1958 roundup 

Personalities 

Newsmaker of week: A. C. Nielsen, Sr., A. C. 
Nielsen Co., chmn _. ._ 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Eastman, pres., 
Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. ... 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Kintner, pres., NBC 

Newsmaker of week: The Broadcasting Industry 

Newsmaker of week: Jules Herbuveaux, v.p., cen- 
tral div., NBC .. 

Newsmaker of week: John Schneider, CBS TV's 
o&o mgr., WCAU-TV 

Newsmaker of week: Charles H. Crutchfield, exec, 
v.p. & gen. mgr., Jefferson Std. Bdctg. Co. 

Newsmaker of week: Jack Wrather, Bd. chmn., In- 
dependent Television Corp. 

Newsmaker of week: Oliver Treyz, pres., ABC TV 

Newsmaker of week: Edmund C. Bunker, v.p. & 
gen. mgr. of network sales, CBS TV ..... __ 

Announcers I have known (McMillin) 

Newsmaker of week: Dr. James Hillier, v.p., RCA 
Labs. 

Newsmaker of week: Paul B. West, pres., ANA ..... 

How to cut red tape, by staying home (Gerald A. 
Bartell) 

Newsmaker of week: Todd Storz, pres., Storz 
Broadcasting Co. 

Newsmaker of week: Lloyd E. Yoder, v.p. & gen. 
mgr., NBC's WNBC, WMAQ ... 

Newsmaker of week: Milton A. Gordon, pres., 
Galaxy Productions 



TV/Radio Case Histories 

Sandran's one-two air media punch .... 

Spot brings home the Folger coffee 

How AMF sets 'em up in the summer 

Cigarettes on the air: fall bonanza 

Saturation radio/tv sells real estate 



8 Nov. p. 40 I 

15 Nov. p. 34 i 

15 Nov. p. 40 

22 Nov. p. 8 

22 Nov. p. 31 

29 Nov. p. 26 

29 Nov. p. 33 

29 Nov. p. 38 

6 Dec. p. 48 

13 Dec. p. 8 

13 Dec. p. 25 

13 Dec. p. 30 

20 Dec. p. 6 

20 Dec. p. 26 

20 Dec. p. 33 

20 Dec. p. 54 

27 Dec. p. 8 

27 Dec. p. 23 



5 July p. 4 

12 July p. 4 

19 July p. 4 

26 July p. 4 

16 Aug. p. 4 

23 Aug. p. 5 

20 Sept. p. 6 

27 Sept. p. 6| 
11 Oct. p. 6 

25 Oct. p. 6 

25 Oct. p. 10 

1 Nov. p. 6 

15 Nov. p. 6 

29 Nov. p. 42 

6 Dec. p. 

13 Dec. p. 
27 Dec. p. 



Air media: dramatic way to sell movies 

Oklahoma Oil builds an air network 

Chrysler's startling new air strategy 

The "speed up" era: three cigarette case histories 

Air media: department store lifeline * 

Nunn shows Standard Oil's use of radio/tv 



COSTS 

Web daytime rates get overhaul 5 July 

Is recession cutting '58 ad budgets? 12 July 

Want to figure out spot costs quickly? 19 July 

Spot radio heads for record $192 million volume 

in 1958 28 July 



26 July 


P- 




2 Aug. 


P- 


28 


16 Aug. 


P- 


32 


16 Aug. 


P- 


3? 


16 Aug. 


P- 


37 


16 Aug. 


P- 


11 


30 Aug. 


P- 


3( 


20 Sept. 


P- 


27 


20 Sept. 


P- 


3' 


11 Oct. 


P- 


4. : 


25 Oct. 


P- 


35 



I'. 3 

p. 39 

p. 3: 

P. 2! 



44 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 195S 



Lost of a syndicated half-hour show 28 July p. 33 
|k new way to measure the cost of servicing ac- 

! counts I Norman Cohen, Emil Mogul) 9 Aug. p. 42 

Local rate muddle at hoiling point .„ 16 Aug. p. 27 

ilight rise seen in daytime spot rates 16 Aug. p. 41 

pop 20 advertisers in spot tv, net tv, radio 30 Aug. p. 32 

, 'op 100 spenders in spot tv, 2nd quarter 1958 30 Aug. p. 33 

"op 100 national advertisers for first half of '58 30 Aug. p. 93 
PConnell's streamlined rate card stirs timehuyer 

enthusiasm 6 Sept. p. 40 

8 million less for specs (so far) 13 Sept. p. 44 
low Chrysler Corp. sales compare to net tv/radio 

expenditures _ 20 Sept. p. 29 

\ revenues in multi-station markets - 20 Sept. p. 37 

typical costs of well-produced jingles 11 Oct. p. 43 



COMMERCIALS 

tanking copy goes human (McMillin) 5 July p. 27 

Memory vision: new NBC radio ad sound 5 July p. 33 

.he or film, know thy star (Csida) 12 July p. 17 

|.Vill union snags slow videotape growth? 12 July p. 42 

Hie hard yell sell (McMillin) 19 July p. 18 

pet more out of your storyhoards 19 July p. 34 

X hat viewers dislike in commercials 26 July p. 34 

lontemporary ingredient chatter is waste of com- 
mercial time (McMillin) 2 Aug. p. 16 

to dentists have a case against tv? 9 Aug. p. 29 

Why Prudential likes public service programing . 9 Aug. p. 32 

|A preview of new fall tv commercials 9 Aug. p. 36 

Consider French's mashed potato (McMillin) 16 Aug. p. 18 

iVhy advertisers cross plug on net tv 16 Aug. p. 31 

Mine facts you should know about animation 23 Aug. p. 40 

\\(. creativeness (McMillin) 30 Aug. p. 12 

The last of the whitecoats ( feature) 6 Sept. p. 38 

A h\ the biggest aren't the best (McMillin) 13 Sept. p. 26 

op) platforms for radio and tv (McMillin) 27 Sept. p. 12 

[Sponsor Asks: Can off-beat animated commercials 

. really sell a mass market? 4 Oct. p. 44 

h pocket full of peeves (McMillin) 11 Oct. p. 10 

Tow to produce a top radio spot ..... 11 Oct. p. 42 

CLM -hunts fen real Dutch flavor 18 Oct. p. 46 
[Sponsor Asks: What is the effectiveness of person- 

I ality-delivered commercials vs. e.t.? 18 Oct. p. 52 
Sponsor Asks: How can the tv commercial capture 

the inattentive viewer? 22 Nov. p. 50 

[Sponsor Asks: What are the prime considerations 

, in using a star in a commercial? 29 Nov. p. 56 

■amps lor the eyes of oilmen (McMillin) 6 Dec. p. 10 

tenaissance in radio commercials 6 Dec. p. 30 

How to integrate your commercial 13 Dec. p. 38 

Elgin's amazing Christmas baby 20 Dec. p. 23 



MARKETING 

Alaska's potential for advertisers 19 July p. 38 
Sponsor Asks: How does a station become top- 
rated in a market? 16 Aug. p. 40 

"'Private brand" wars spur spot . 30 Aug. p. 29 

Avalanche of new products changes ad tactics- 20 Sept. p. 34 

The BBDO marketing set-up grows 20 Sept. p. 38 
Sponsor Asks: Can off-beat animated commercials 

really sell a mass market? 4 Oct. p. 44 

Sponsor backs another tv challenge (Parti-Day) 25 Oct. p. 36 

The Parti-Day tv test is on the way 1 Nov. p. 29 
Sponsor Asks: How is Negro radio faring in your 

market? 1 Nov. p. 54 

Parti-Day results: second week .. 8 Nov. p. 38 

Parti-Day sales begin to climb, 3rd week ... 15 Nov. p. 43 

Parti-Day jumps to 80%, 4th week ... 22 Nov. p. 43 

2,030 cases of Parti-Day in first month: 5th week 29 Nov. p. 36 

Tv ups Parti-Day display, 6th week 6 Dec. p. 39 

370 more for Parti-Day, 7th week 13 Dec. p. 29 
Sponsor Asks: How does your company use NCS 

#3? 13 Dec. p. 44 

Parti-Day tops toppings, 8th week 20 Dec. p. 29 

When the farmer needs a friend (Cynamid) 20 Dec. p. 30 

Parti-Day report on second test month, 9th week.. 27 Dec. p. 28 



MERCHANDISING, PROMOTION, PUBLICITY 

How can radio/tv improve community relations 

(Hanque Ringgold) 26 July p. 38 
Breakdown of publicity staff at 10 various sized 

ad agencies 2 Aug. p. 31 
Sponsor Asks: How does a station become top-rated 

in a market? 16 Aug. p. 10 

Pet Milk's big merchandising parlay 23 Aug. p. 36 

Why merchandise a syndicated show? . 6 Sept. p. 36 
Sponsor Asks: Can off-beat animated commercials 

really sell a mass market? ..._ 4 Oct. p. 44 

Sponsor Asks: What audience promotion devices 

have you found useful? _ 11 Oct. p. 60 

Radio's $1,200 draw . 18 Oct. p. 39 
Self-service puts premium on radio/tv displays 

(Ralph Head) 18 Oct. p. 10 

Inco's $500,000, 33-market spot radio soft sell 6 Dec. p. 32 

Free to Standard Oil (Cal.), $100,000 in promotion 20 Dec. p. 36 



PRODUCT CASE HISTORIES 

Appliances 

Mort Farr sells far more on local tv 2 Aug. p. 33 



FILM 

-he or film, know thy star (Csida) . 

iyndicator attacks "formula"' timebuyer 

\' u advertisers, renewals hint record "58 for film 

lelepulse ratings: top spot film shows 

\ii media: dramatic way to sell movies ... 
some tacts you should know about animation 
\Why merchandise a syndicated show 
[Shortage of post '48's won't stymie feature films 
(Sponsor Asks: Has local tv become a film medium? 
lelepulse ratings: top spot film shows 
indicators' new programing for '59 .. 
Telepulse ratings: top spot film -hows ... 



FOREIGN 

Color tv wins at Brussels 5 July 

\u adman views tv abroad 2 Aug. 

Canadian issue 30 Aug. 

Miort wave: quick route to sales in Latin America 20 Sept. 



12 July 


P- 


17 


12 July 


P- 


34 


26 July 


P- 


33 


2 Aug. 


P- 


48 


16 \ug. 


P- 


40 


23 Aug. 


P- 


40 


6 Sept. 


P- 


36 


13 Sept. 


P- 


44 


20 Sept. 


P- 


42 


25 Oct. 


P- 


61 


8 Nov. 


P- 


44 


6 Dec. 


P- 


50 



p. 42 

p. 23 

p. 41 

p. 40 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



Automotives 

Local air promotion works for Dodge 12 July p. 10 

Small car gets big push from radio (Renault) 9 Aug. p. 'i ( > 

Why Bay Area Rambler tried tv film 6 Dec. p. 12 

Beer and Ale 

Schaefer switches to time-check spots 18 Oct. p. 38 

D.J. spoof creates new pale stale ale 13 Dee. p. 28 

Candy and Con lections 

Volume pickup via tv licks Conomo's cost problem 22 Nov. p. 40 

Clothinii and Accessories 

Karl Shoes reaches markets-within-markets with 

radio 1 Oct. p. 12 

Chief apparel lire- salvo at "co-op" ad campaigns 15 Nov. p. 36 



15 



STARTING PATE NET BILL 



ADVERTISER AGENCY 

NEW BUSINESS: 

American Safety Razor Corp. ■ ■ ■ Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. ..a........ 11/4/58 

Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company . Paris & Peart, Inc 12/8/58 

automotive product ......... TBA .. ..»...■■. ■■■■■>■■■ 2/2/59 

Borden Company ■■■■>■ Young & Rubicam, Inc. ■ ■■ 12/15/58 

Elgin National Watch Co. ■ J. Walter Thompson Co - - ■ 12/13/58 

Evinrude Motors ■■■■■.■■■■■. Cramer- Krasselt Co. >■■ 4/17/59 

food products manufacturer ■ ■ ■ TBA ■ ■ . ■ ..■■■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 2/21/59 

Good Housekeeping Magazine ■ ■ Grey Advertising Agency, Inc. ■■■■>*■ 1/20/59 

P. H. Hanes Knitting Mills N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc . TBA 

insurance company ■■■■■■■■■ TBA ■■■■■■■■-■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ TBA 



$ 



Albert Frank-Guenther Law, Inc. 



Kiplinger Magazine ■■■■■■■■ 
Lever Brothers Company 

Air-Wick ...■■..■■■■■■■. Foote, Cone & Belding ■■■■■■.■■■.. 

Dove ■■■■■■■■■■■■ Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, Inc. ■■■■■■.. 

Pepsodent .■■■■■>-.-■■■ Foote, Cone & Belding ■ 

Surf ■■■■■■■■■■■>■■■■■ Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. ■ ■ 



1/3/59 



Mogen David Wine Corp. 
Philip Morris & Company, Ltd. 
Popular Science Monthly > ■ ■ 
Radio Corporation of America 
Raybestos ■■■■■■>■■■■■■ 
Renuzit Home Products Co. ■ 
Savings & Loan Foundation ■ 
Time, Incorporated 

Life Magazine ■■■■■■■■ 

Time Magazine ■■■■■■■ 

Volkswagon ■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

Waverly Fabrics ■■■■■■■■■ 

The White House Company > ■ 



Edward H. Weiss & Company 
Leo Burnett Company, Inc. ■ ■ 
Schwab & Beatty, Inc. ■ ■ ■ ■ . 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. ■ ■ ■ 
Gray & Rogers 



.12/5/58 
1/12/59 
. 1/9/59 
. 1/5/59 
12/22/58 
1/24/59 
. 1/3/59 
2/6/59 
5/2/59 



William Wrigley Jr., Co 

RENEWED BUSINESS: 
Allis Chalmers Mfg. Co. ■■■■■■ 
American Motors-Rambler ■ ■ ■ ■ 
Bristol-Myers Company ■■■■■■ 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. 
Ex-Lax, Inc. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 
Lewis Howe Company ■■■■■■■ 
North American Van Lines, Inc. a 
Radio Corporation of America > ■ 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. ■ ■ ■ ■ 
Sun Oil Company ■■■■■■>■■■ 



Arndt, Preston, Chapin, Lamb & Keen, Inc. ■ 2/16/59 
McCann-Erickson, Inc. ■--......... 12/27/58 

Young & Rubicam, Inc. 12/15/58 

Joe Gans & Company . . ■ . 11/18/58 

Compton Advertising, Inc. ■.■■■■■■■ 12/27/58 
Ehrlich, Neuwirth & Sobo, Inc. ........ 1/5/59 

Victor & Richards, Inc. ■■ 12/6/58 

Kushins, Anderson & Takaro, Inc. ■■■■■■ 1/3/59 
Arthur Meyerhoff & Company . 12/1/58 



Bert S. Gittins Advertising, Inc. - . ■ ■ - 
Geyer Advertising ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 
Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 
Ted Bates & Company, Inc. ■■■■■■■■ 
Warwick & Legler, Inc. ■.■■■■■■■■■ 
McCann-Erickson, Inc. ■■■■■■■. ■■■ 
The Biddle Advertising Company ■ ■ . 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. ■■■■■■■■■ 
William Esty Company, Inc. ■■■>■■> 
William Esty Company, Inc. ■ ■ 



12 



1 advertiser and agency name available on January 30, 2959 



1/1/59 

/21/59 
1/5/59 
/29/58 
1/5/59 
1/5/59 
1/4/59 
/13/58 
...... 1/1/59 

1/5/59 

GRAND TOTAL 



12 



15,0 
. 19,3 
584,0 

a a 9,8 

--4,2 
.85,0 
593,0 
. 21,6 

- 85,2, 
209,01 

- 12,21 

a 30,2| 
.21,0! 

- 52,S| 

- 56,91 
. 63,6: 
110,Gi 

- - 6,S| 
154,2; 
. 54,31 

a 13,8 

- 13,4! 



- 22,£| 

- - 3,C| 
a.2,ll 

141,8 
--2,8 

a 15,i 

.45,6 



. . 295,: 
. ■ 580,C 
. . 404, 
.1,050,( 
. . 508,( 
ol,050,( 
. . 125,(1 

. . a . 8,fl 

a . 352,(1 
..418,(2 
$7,242,13 




as of the close of /business. January 15 . . . 




$7,000,000 n 



From November 1, 1958 through Jani| 
15, 1959, thirty-four advertisers inva 
$7,242,843 net on the NBC Radio NeftJ 
This investment in new sales and reneij 
was truly the greatest sales period 
any radio network has known in yj 



46 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959,1 



sales in seventy-six days! 

fhe advertisers bought a complete hot line, and Stardust. They bought NBC 

f< dcast service. They bought NBC Radio's exciting approaches to marketing 

ilo's dynamic modern programming problems — Engineered Circulation, Im- 

•ept, initiated 2 : /2 years ago, and ex- agery Transfer, Memory Vision, and the 

tlified by result-getting programs like remarkable Salesvertising Plan that ties 

fJlTOR, nightline, news OF the HOUR, local dealers in with national campaigns. 

IHE NBC RADIO NETWORK 

■sponsor • 24 JANUARY 1959 47 

L 



Drugs and Cosmetics 

Spot tv moves 'em faster (Drug Research Corp.).... 27 Sept. p. 44 
Radio reaches working women best, says Dr. Scholl 6 Dec. p. 40 



Financial and Insurance 

Sell investment counseling by radio 5 July p. 40 

Spot radio delivers the mail (Met Life) _ 12 July p. 31 

Why Prudential likes public service programing 9 Aug. p. 32 



Food and Beverages 

Kellogg gets up-in-the-air with helicopter advertis- 
ing (KABC) 19 July p. 37 

Spot brings home the Folger coffee __. 2 Aug. p. 28 

Pet Milk's big merchandising parlay 23 Aug. p. 36 

What Maola did with regional radio .__. 13 Sept. p. 43 

Spot tv on kids' shows prove No. 1 apple seller 20 Sept. p. 33 

Kroger tests new spot radio pattern .. 20 Sept. p. 36 

French's terrific tv sales success 4 Oct. p. 38 

Radio is hot for frozen ravioli 18 Oct. p. 45 

Bosco stirs up 250,000 teen-agers 25 Oct. p. 34 

Butternut thrives on off-beat humor 1 Nov. p. 40 

Single jingle builds 10-year success (Carolina 

Rice) 8 Nov. p. 39 

Kroger builds 3-way radio formula 22 Nov. p. 42 

Maypo's smart use of spot tv 6 Dec. p. 34 

Look who buys the spaghetti (La Rosa) 13 Dec. p. 35 

How to hold onto that holiday spirit (Ferris Ham) 27 Dec. p. 31 

Gas and Oil 

Texaco's nighttime radio bombshell 19 July p. 29 

Oklahoma Oil builds an air network 30 Aug. p. 36 

Free to Standard Oil (Cal.), $100,000 in promotion 20 Dec. p. 36 



Retailing 

Radio is bargain for bargain store 12 July p. 41 

Air media: department store lifeline 11 Oct. p. 45 

Radio gives paint sales bright hue 25 Oct. p. 37 

Transportation Services 

Western Airlines gave tv the bird 9 Aug. p. 40 

Union Pacific sells freight service with spot tv 23 Aug. p. 43 

Miscellaneous 

Sandran's one-two media punch 26 July p. 40 

How AMF sets 'em up in summer 16 Aug. p. 32 

Saturation radio/tv sells real estate 16 Aug. p. 37 

Can spot radio "demonstrate" your product? 

(Cameo Curtains) 30 Aug. p. 33 

How radio sells a quality image for Sterling Silver 6 Sept. p. 37 

Dixie Cup's unusual air strategy 6 Sept. p. 42 

Play-Doh: $3 million spot tv wonder 13 Sept. p. 39 

Radio builds |1 million sales for music store 27 Sept. p. 40 

Radio creates a selling image for plastering busi- 
ness -- 15 Nov. p. 41 

Homebuilder loves radio's Sunday evening punch 29 Nov. p. 44 

Inco's $500,000, 33-market spot radio soft sell 6 Dec. p. 32 



PROGRAMING 

How tv's program "mess" hits sponsors — 12 July p. 29 

Sponsor Asks: How do you plan to use your video- 
tape machine? 12 July p. 50 

How program specialists help spot 19 July p. 27 

Diary of a rep's program trip 19 July p. 28 



Dan Seymour: guiding genius of JWT's air strategy 19 July p. 30 

Sponsor Asks: Has tv news lived up to its promise? 19 July p. 44 

Blair report on local radio programing 26 July p. 51 

Barn dance: radio's hardiest perennial „ 2 Aug. p. 26 

Muzak enters radio fray with programing service 9 Aug. p. 38 
Sponsor Asks: Is music and news still a vital pro- 
graming force? 9 Aug. p. 46 

Radio has use for all programing (Csida) 23 Aug. p. 10 

Sponsor Asks: What are the essentials of daytime 

tv programing? 30 Aug. p. 68 

Sponsor Asks: How will independents program 

against net competition? 6 Sept. p. 54l 

Tv's fall forecast (Csida) 13 Sept. p. Ill 

Radio peps up its news leadership 4 Oct. p. 29 j 

Are tv kid shows in for a change? 15 Nov. p. 37 

Run your station better, says adman 15 Nov. p. 401 

Sponsor Asks: What constitutes good radio news? 15 Nov. p. 46] 



RADIO 



General 



Who gets the out-of-home audience? 

Blair report on local radio programing 

The old fashioned barn dance: radio's hardiest 
perennial — 

Muzak enters the radio music fray with news serv- 
ice 

Sponsor Asks: Is music and news still a vital pro- 
graming force ? 

Station manager pinpoints blame for changes in 
radio - — - - 

Radio has use for all programing (Csida) 

A new look at nighttime radio shows audience size, 
quality ._ 

Sponsor Asks: What is the place of the regional 
network in today's radio? - — 

Radio peps up its news leadership — - 

Tea spots win honors in radio vote 

How to produce a top radio spot _. 

Phillips buys radar weathercasts 

Radio's $1,200 draw ...- 

Radio: is it the short changed ad medium? 

Sponsor Asks: How is Negro radio faring in your 
market? .._ 

Sponsor Asks: What constitutes good radio news? 

Station reverses itself, won't accept liquor ads .... 

What advertisers and agencies ask about radio .... 

Renaissance in radio commercials 

A problem-beset medium fights back 

Radio wallops newspapers in new grocery shopping 
study _. 

Mitch Miller sells like crazy 



12 July 
26 July 


P- 
P. 


37 

51 


2 Aug. 


P- 


26 


9 Aug. 


P- 


38 


9 Aug. 


p. 


16 


16 Aug. 
23 Aug. 


P. 

P- 


38 

Hi 



23 Aug. p. 42 



27 Sept. 

4 Oct. 

4 Oct. 
11 Oct. 
11 Oct. 
18 Oct. 

1 Nov. 

1 Nov. 
15 Nov. 
29 Nov. 
29 Nov. 

6 Dec. 
13 Dec. 

20 Dec. 
20 Dec. 



p. 54 
p. 29 
p. 40' 
p. 42 
p. 44 
p. 39 
p. 34 

p. 54 
p. 46 
p. 38 
p. 40 
p. 36 
p. 25 

p. 26 
p. 37 



Case Histories 

Investment firm sells services by radio 5 July p. 4C 

Spot radio delivers the mail (Met Life) 12 July p. 3} 

Local air promotion works for Dodge _ 12 July p. 4( 

Radio is bargain for bargain store 12 July p. 4] 

Texaco's nighttime radio bombshell .._ 19 July p. 2i 

Kellogg get-up-in-air with helicopter (KABC) _ 19 July p. 3 

Small car gets big push from radio (Renault) 9 Aug. p. 3? 

Pet Milk's big merchandising parlay 23 Aug. p. 3f 

How radio saved Helotes, Texas from becoming a 

ghost town 23 Aug. p. 3 

Can spot radio "demonstrate" your product? 30 Aug. p. 3. 

How radio sells a quality image for Sterling Silver 6 Sept. p. 3 

What Maola did with regional radio ..._ 13 Sept. p. 4;; 

Kroger tests new spot radio pattern 20 Sept. p. 3 

Radio builds $1 million sales for music store 27 Sept. p 

Radio in "minority markets" boosts shoe sales 

(Karl Shoes) 4 Oct. p. 4 



48 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1955 



To sell Indiana, 

you need both 

the 2nd and 3rd 

ranking markets. 

NOW 
ONE BUY 

delivers both — 

AT A 10% 
SAVINGS! 



YOU NEED TWIN BILLING 

in Indiana ! 




m 







" ■ -*■ ■« 




Now, a new, two-station TV buy blankets both the 
South Bend-Elkhart and Fort Wayne markets, plus 
healthy chunks of Southern Michigan and Western 
Ohio. Over 1.6 million population — $2.8 billion Effec- 
tive Buying Income. Alert buyers are covering these 
rich markets in combination — and saving 10%! They're 
buying them right along with Indianapolis — thus cov- 
ering all the best of Indiana from within — with just 
two buys! 



see your 



H-R 



man soon 



~v 








TO7 



SOUTH BEND U EKHAfiT 




\K7 Bs 



FOR r wa y ne 




p- 


33 


p. 


39 


p- 


40 


p- 


33 


p. 


10 


p. 


54 



Radio is hot for frozen ravioli 18 Oct. p. 45 

Radio gives paint sales bright hue 25 Oct. p. 37 

Butternut thrives on off-beat humor 1 Nov. p. 40 

Single jingle builds 10-year success (Carolina Rice) 8 Nov. p. 39 
Radio creates a selling image for plastering busi- 
ness 15 Nov. p. 41 

Kroger builds 3-way radio formula 22 Nov. p. &2 

Homebuilder loves radio's Sunday evening punch 29 Nov. p. 44 

Inco's $500,000, 33-market spot radio soft sell 6 Dec. p. 32 

Radio reaches working women best, says Dr. Scholl 6 Dec. p. 40 

D.J. spoof creates new pale stale ale 13 Dec. p. 28 

Radio revs up a grand old brand name (Hires) 20 Dec. p. 38 



Network 

Memory vision: NBC's new commercial sound . 5 July 

Night buys highlight net radio sales 19 July- 
Net radio's current client list 19 July 

Network radio: new light on a tough flight 13 Sept. 

The web's last stand (Csida) 15 Nov. 

What the CBS radio "consolidation" is all about .. 15 Nov. 



Radio Basics 

More radio set sales in '58 than in '57 19 July p. 39 

Night buys highlight net radio sales 19 July p. 39 

Net radio's current client list — . 19 July p. 40 

Slight rise seen in daytime spot rates 16 Aug. p. 41 

Facts and figures about radio today __ 20 Sept. p. 41 

Top shows in spot radio in 4 cities _ 11 Oct. p. 62 

Current listening pattern in-home listening during 

summer hours 8 Nov. p. 52 

Current listening patterns in-home listening, Oct. 

'57-Sept. '58 6 Dec. p. 46 



Radio Results 

Automobiles, optical aids, dinnerware, grocery- 
supermarkets 26 July p. 62 

Poultry, houses, restaurant, pest control _ 32 Aug. p. 54 

Personal management, houses, department store, 

finance 20 Sept. p. 48 

Supermarket, garden equipment, banking, trans- 
portation 18 Oct. p. 56 

Finance, pianos and organs, travel bureau, perfumes 15 Nov. p. 50 

Traveler's cheques, paint, liquid adhesive, travel 13 Dec. p. 42 

Annual Radio Results for 1958 27 Dec. p. 33 



Spot 

Spot radio delivers the mail (Met Life) 12 July p. 31 

Spot radio heads for record $192 million in '58 26 July p. 28 

15 basic reasons for buying spot _ 2 Aug. p. 32 

Can spot radio "demonstrate" your product (Caro- 
lina Rice I 30 Aug. p. 33 

How 6 industries will use spot radio this fall 30 Aug. p. 38 

Kroger tests new spot radio pattern 20 Sept. p. 36 

How a spot buy is made ~ 18 Oct. p. 35 

A problem-beset medium fights back: Part I 13 Dec. p. 25 

Spot radio problems: Part II 20 Dec. p. 33 

Spot radio's 51 leaders in 1958 27 Dec. p. 29 



RATINGS 

Newsmaker of week: A. C. Nielsen, Sr., chmn., 

A. C. Nielsen Co 5 July 

Sponsor Asks: Are rating services keeping pace 

with timebuyers? . 5 July 

Behind the rating systems: Part I — The Pulse .... 20 Sept. 

Behind the rating systems: Part II — ARB _. 27 Sept. 

Behind the rating systems: Part III — Trendex .... 4 Oct. 

Behind the rating systems: Part IV — Videodex 11 Oct. 



Behind the rating systems: Part V — Hooper 18 Oct. 

Behind the rating systems: Part VI — Nielsen 1 Nov. 

Highlights on six rating services: a recap 8 Nov. 

Watch those net tv local ratings! 22 Nov. 

Sponsor Asks: How does your company use NCS 

#3? 13 Dec. 



42 
37 
47 
36 



p. 44 



REPRESENTATIVES 

WBC sets up rep firm 5 July p. 38 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Eastman, pres., 

Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc .._ 12 July 

Who gets the out-of-home audience? 12 July 

How program specialists help spot 19 July 

Diary of a rep's program trip 19 July 

Blair "calculator" estimates spot tv $ 19 July 

Blair report on local radio programing 26 July 

An adman views tv abroad 2 Aug. 

A day in the life of a station rep 

( Richard B. Colburn, Blair) 

O'Connell's "streamlined" rate card stirs timebuyer 

enthusiasm 

15 keys to better timebuyer-timeseller relationships 
How 17 Atlanta reps get the real advertising low- 
down 



P- 4 

p. 37 
p. 27 
p. 28 | 
p. 32 I 
p. 51 

p. 34 ; 



30 Aug. p. 34 I 

6 Sept. p. 40 
13 Sept. p. 36 I 

22 Nov. p. 39 I 



p- 


60 


p- 


30 


p- 


36 


p- 


36 


p- 


40 



RESEARCH AND SURVEYS 

Tv monitors boom due to triple spots 5 July p. 34 

Tv saturation continues to climb 5 July p. 35 

Who gets the out-of-home audience? 12 July p. 37 

What viewers dislike in commercials 26 July p. 34 

Uhf: pockets of strength (NCS #2 & #3) 9 Aug. p. 34 

A new look at nighttime radio shows audience 

quality, size 23 Aug. 

How will agencies use NCS #3? 23 Aug. 

10 guide rules for grocery advertisers (Nielsen) .... 30 Aug. 

The ARF tv set count No. 3 (March '58) 13 Sept. 

Behind the rating systems: Part I — The Pulse 20 Sept. 

Behind the rating systems: Part II — ARB 27 Sept. 

Behind the rating systems: Part III — Trendex 4 Oct. 

Behind the rating systems: Part IV — Videodex 11 Oct. 

WOW's catch-'em-on-the-run survey technique 11 Oct. 

Behind the rating systems: Part V — Hooper 18 Oct. 

Sponsor backs another tv challenge (Parti-Day) .... 25 Oct. 

The Parti-Day tv test is on the way 1 Nov. 

Radio: is it the short-changed ad medium? 1 Nov. 

Behind the rating systems: Part VI — Nielsen 1 Nov. 

Parti-Day results: 2nd week 8 Nov. 

Highlights on six rating services (summary) 8 Nov. 

Parti-Day sales begin to climb: 3rd week 15 Nov. 
C&W's videotown is in love again with morning 

radio 22 Nov. 

Parti-Day jumps to 80%: 4th week 22 Nov. 

2,030 cases of Parti-Day in first month: 5th week .. 29 Nov. 

How RAB makes research easier for timebuyers ... . 29 Nov. 

Tv tips Parti-Day display: 6th week 6 Dec. 

Video viewing is up in evening, down in afternoon, 

says ARB 6 Dec. 

370 more for Parti-Day: 7th week 13 Dec. p. 

Y&R digs for facts "beyond ratings" 13 Dec. p. 

Sponsor Asks: How does your company use NCS 

#3? 13 Dec. p. 

Radio wallops newspapers in new grocery shopping 

study -- 20 Dec. p. 2( 

Parti-Day toppings: 8th week 20 Dec. p. 25 

Parti-Day report on second test month: 9th week... 27 Dec. p. 2f 



SPECIAL ISSUES, SECTIONS 

Canadian issue, 1958 30 Aug. p. 4 

The Canadian market 30 Aug. p. 4; 

Canadian radio trends — 30 Aug. p. 4» 

Canadian tv trends 30 Aug. p. 4« 



p. 42 
p. 44 
p. 29 
p. 47 
p. 30 
p. 36 
p. 36 
p. 40 
p. 47 
p. 42! 
p. 36 
p. 29 
p. 34 
p. 37 
p. 38 
p. 47 
p. 43 

p. 38 
P. 43 
p. 36 

P. « 
p. 3< 

P- 



50 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 195* 



& 





\3 




...THE MOST 
IMPORTANT 



NEW TV SHOW 



FOR CHILDREN 

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IN PRODUCTION NOW FOR DEBUT TELECAST SEPTEMBER, 1959. 
260 episodes • 4 minutes each • Unique "chapter" format 
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TRANS -LUX TELEVISION CORP., 625 MADISON AVE., NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 1-3110-1-2-3-4 




JPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



m 



5] 



Canadian radio basics 30 Aug. 

Canadian tv basics 30 Aug. 

sponsor Index: First half of 1958 11 Oct. 

sponsor's 7th Annual Farm Section 25 Oct. 

Farm stations 25 Oct. 

The farm reaps big crop of $ 25 Oct. 

Farm radio basics 25 Oct. 

Farm market basics 25 Oct. 



p. 48 

p. 53 

p. 51 

p. 41 

p. 42 

p. 44 

p. 46 

p. 50 



TELEVISION 



General 



Tv monitors boom due to triple spots 

Tv saturation continues to climb 

Color tv wins at Brussels 

Will union snags slow videotape growth? 

Sponsor Asks: How do you plan to use your video- 
tape machine? 

Tv's best salesman: tv 

Get more out of your storyboards 

Tv's No. 1 success story: Tv Guide __ 

Sponsor Asks: Has tv news lived up to its promise? 

Critique on the critics (Csida) 

New advertisers, renewals hint record '58 for film 

\\ hat viewers dislike in commercials 

An adman views tv abroad __ 

Uhf and FCC (Csida) 

Uhf: Pockets of strength, but slow over-all decline 

Sponsor Asks: How does a station become top-rated 
in a market? 

Sponsor Asks: What are the essentials of daytime tv 



5 July p. 34 

5 July p. 35 

5 July p. 42 

12 July p. 42 



12 July 
19 July 
19 July 
19 July 
19 July 
26 July 
26 July 
26 July 

2 Aug. 

9 Aug. 

9 Aug. 



p. 50 

p. 33 

p. 34 

p. 36 

p. 44 

p. 22 

p. 33 

p. 34 

p. 34 

p. 20 

p. 34 



16 Aug. p. 40 



programing i 



Pay tv's hand keeps writing (Csida) 

Tv's revolutionary videotape: Part I 

Why merchandise a syndicated show? _.. 

The last of the whitecoats (feature) 

Tv's revolutionary videotape: Part II 

$8 million less for specs (so far) 

Shortage of post '48's won't stymie feature film 

Tv's fall forecast (Csida) 

Tv revenues in multi-station markets _ 

Sponsor Asks: Has local tv become a film medium? 

Soaps' washing out print for more air 

A new show: a tarnished idol (Csida) 

End of an era (Csida) 

Punch 'em up on election night __ 

How agencies pep up tv selling with popular local 

personalities 

Why you can't buy minute tv spots 

The chemicals flock to television _... 

Sponsor Asks: How's color tv doing in your market? 

B&B's "cactus theme'' for Schick 

Why big industry is moving into tv 

Are tv kid shows in for a change? _ 

Sponsor Asks: How can the tv commercial capture 

the inattentive viewer? 

How Fortune tipped off the new anti-tv party line 

The "show me boys" move into tv 

Tv's reply to print (Csida) 

When the farmer needs a friend: Cynamid's tv 

approach 

Sponsor Asks: Do the tv critics really hurt televi- 
sion ? 



Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
13 Sept. 
13 Sept. 
13 Sept. 
20 Sept. 
20 Sept. 
20 Sept. 
27 Sept. 
4 Oct. 
18 Oct. 
18 Oct. 

18 Oct. 
25 Oct. 
25 Oct. 
25 Oct. 

8 Nov. 



p. 68 

p. 12 

p. 29 

p. 36 

p. 38 

p. 40 



44 
44 
10 

37 



p. 42 

p. 34 

p. 12 

p. 20 

p. 47 

p. 48 

p. 31 

p. 38 

p. 66 

p. 33 



15 Nov. p. 31 

15 Nov. p. 37 

22 Nov. p. 50 

29 Nov. p. 33 

6 Dec. p. 29 

13 Dec. p. 8 

20 Dec. p. 30 

20 Dec. p. 54 



Case Histories 

Appliance dealer sells more on local tv (Mort Farr) 2 Aug. p. 33 

Western Airlines gave tv the bird 9 Aug. p. 40 

Dixie Cup's unusual air strategy 6 Sept. p. 42 

Play-Doh: $3 million spot tv wonder 13 Sept. p. 39 

Spot tv moves 'em faster (Drug Research Corp.) .... 27 Sept, p. 44 

French's terrific tv sales success 4 Oct. p. 38 

Bosco stirs up 250,000 teenagers 25 Oct. p. 34 



52 



Sponsor backs another tv challenge (Parti-Day) ... 25 Oct. 

The Parti-Day tv test is on the way 1 Nov. 

Parti-Day results: 2nd week 8 Nov. 

"Zipperless zipper" tv spot campaign is sell-out .... 15 Nov. 

Parti-Day sales begin climb 15 Nov. 

Volume pickup via tv licks Conomo's cost problem 22 Nov. 

Parti-Day jumps to 80%: 4th week 22 Nov. 

2,030 cases of Parti-Day in first month: 5th week 29 Nov. 

Maypo's smart use of spot tv 6 Dec. 

Tv ups Parti-Day display: 6th week _ 6 Dec. 

Why Bay Area Rambler tried tv film __ 6 Dec. 

370 more for Parti-Day: 7th week 13 Dec. 

LaRosa uses Tom Sawyer technique to sell spaghetti 13 Dec. 

Parti-Day tops toppings: 8th week 20 Dec. 

Free to Standard Oil (Cal.), $100,000 in promotion 20 Dec. 

Parti-Day report on second test month: 9th week... 27 Dec. 

Ferris holds onto that holiday spirit 27 Dec. 



Network 



p- 


36 


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1<) 


p. 


38 


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13 


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10 


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29 


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29 


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36 


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28 


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31 



Web daytime rates get overhaul 5 July 

Net tv's hot weather line up (basics) 5 July 

How tv's program "mess" hits sponsors 12 July 

Newsmaker of week: Robert E. Kintner, Pres., NBC 19 July 

Dan Seymour: guiding genius of JWT's air strategy 19 July 

Network tv's "silent revolution" 2 Aug. 

Why Prudential likes public service programing 9 Aug. 

A preview of new fall tv commercials 9 Aug. 

Why advertisers cross-plug on net tv 16 Aug. 

Daytime tv explodes into major ad medium 23 Aug. 

Chrysler's startling new air strategy 20 Sept. 

Watch those net tv local ratings 22 Nov. 

CBS drops its "must buy" policy _ 13 Dec. 



p. 31 
p. 43 
p. 29 
p. 4 
p. 30 
p. 23 
p. 32 
p. 36 
p. 31 
p. 31 
p. 27 
p. 36 
p. 30 



Spot 

Blair "slide rule" estimates spot tv $ 19 July p. 32 

New products pushing '58 spot volume up 7-10% ... 26 July p. 30 

Sponsor Asks: What criteria do timebuyers ignore? 26 July p. 42 

15 basic reasons for buying spot 2 Aug. p. 32 

Union Pacific sells freight with spot tv 23 Aug. p. 43 

Spot tv spending: a soap story 30 Aug. p. 32 

Spot tv on kids' shows proves No. 1 apple seller... 20 Sept. p. 33 

New York trip: the hectic day of a visiting fireman 8 Nov. p. 40 

Volume pickup via tv licks Conomo's cost problem 22 Nov. p. 40 

Top 100 advertisers in spot tv: 3rd quarter, 1958 ... 13 Dec. p. 37 



Tv Basics and Comparagraph 

Net tv's hot weather lineup 5 July p 

Comparagraph: 5 July-1 Aug. 5 July p 

Hot weather impact on show types 2 Aug. p 

Comparagraph: 2 Aug.-29 Aug. p 

An early look at fall net tv 6 Sept. p 

Comparagraph: 30 Aug.-26 Sept. 6 Sept. p 

Net tv tally: prices up, dramas down 27 Sept. p 

Comparagraph: 27 Sept.-24 Oct. 27 Sept. p, 

Available: 18 nighttime shows _ 1 Nov. p. 4 

Comparagraph: 25 Oct.-21 Nov. 1 Nov. p. 4 

What net audiences are watching 29 Nov. p. 4; 

Comparagraph: 22 Nov.-19 Dec „__ 29 Nov. p. 4< 

Tv homes: 407c watch 9 hours daily 20 Dec. p. 4! 

Comparagraph: 20 Dec-16 Jan. 20 Dec. p. 4 



Tv Results 

Automobiles, furniture, supermarket, ladies' dresses 12 July 

Restaurant, dogs, food, department store _... 9 Aug. 

Gas, fertilizer, food store, canned goods 6 Sept. 

Automobiles, bank, supermarket, trailers 4 Oct. 

Automobiles, building supplies, jewelry, dairy prod- 
ucts - - — 1 Nov. 

Automobiles, auto & clothing, automobiles, shoes .... 29 Nov. 



p. 51 

p. S 

P . 71 

p. 1! 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 195* 




— to the trained ear it is quickly re- 
cognizable. Likewise, the quality 
atmosphere of a television station 
is just as instantly apparent and 
valued by quality advertisers! 




abc ■ channel 8 dallas 

LDWARD PETRY & CO.. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES ■ A TELEVISION SERVICE OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



53 



Shrimps to Telepathy 




BILLION-ODD YEARS 
AGO, on the floor of the 
ocean, the art of advertis- 
ing was born when some 
forward-looking shrimps 
learned to crack their 
knuckles and some females ( God bless 'em — 
still most sought after by most advertisers ) 
responded. But don't think there wasn't hell 
to pay. 

The sea anemones, and in fact all 
the frond-waving crowd, said that this new 
form of advertising was vulgar, disgusting, 
and a very low form of attention getting. The 
sea slugs, en masse, decried it as a really 
dreadful thing to bring noise into a world 
where there had been no noise before and 
where practically nobody had ears. You would 
have thought the world was coming to an end, 
rather than a beginning. 

After a couple of million years all 
the shrimps were cracking their knuckles all 
the time, and everybody had got used to it and 
things were quite happy and normal until — 
well, until some "gifted" crustaceans thought 
up the idea of long antennae as a means of 
communication. 

A terrific row was raised by every- 
body else — and the shrimps squawked the 
loudest. They said that this innovation would 
make their own advertising system outmoded, 
and unfairly so. Since it was unfair to them, 
it was degrading to the entire world. This row 
quickly settled down in an aeon or two and 
in the meantime things were beginning to 
happen up on earth — on dry land. 






Here the competition in the adver- 
tising field was so bitter and so bloody and so 
useless that we'll skip the saurian details and 
come down to the last split-second of history, 
to Modern Man — to the last micro-second of 
history, to Modern Western Man. 

Still confining our attention to the 
advertising field, we might first mention the 
prodigious ruckus raised by the Fraternal and 
Peregrinating Order of Town Criers when the 
job printers first started turning out hand- 
bills. You should have heard what the bell 
ringing news crooners had to say about the 
bill posters — or perhaps you shouldn't have. 
These latter didn't have long to enjoy the in- 
vective being heaped upon them because soon 
the bill posters had to turn their attention to 
a horrible conspiracy to wipe them out of 
existence — namely the introduction of the 
newspapers. 

You've probably caught on by now 
and realize that newspapers were an inven- 
tion of the devil. The newspapers lived 
mighty rosy life for years and years. They 
managed to get along with their sister me- 
dium, the magazines, because the rhythm of 
publication was so different. 

Then in the early 20's - Oh Brother! 
Some fiend incarnate taught wireless teleg- 
raphy how .to talk ! Here, indeed, was a fright- 
ening challenge to the newspaper industry 
Here was a novel means of communication, 
and a great disseminator of news, entertain- 
ment — and advertising! 

The familiar useless battle ensued 
Newspapers tried in every way to prevent the 



Ed wail 



This (i<li ertisement 

also appeared in the 

'New York Times,' 

'New York Herald Tribune,' 

'Chicago Tribune' and the 

'II all Street Journal.' 



ublic acceptance which was bound to come 
Dr this new medium. They pretended it 
wasn't there and closed their columns to news 
f radio. 

They vilified it. They ridiculed it. 

Later, equilibrium was established 
nee again in the advertising industry. News- 
apers even used radio as an advertising 
tedium to get circulation for their own pub- 
cations, and radio used newspapers to get 
steners. It seemed as if peace might reign 
orever in the advertising world. Then a few 
/itches and men of magic got together in dark 
aves and planned to ruin all advertising 
ledia by persuading somebody to invent a 
ling called "the picture tube." When this 
ew invention finally arrived — television — 
; proved to be such an amazing phenomenon 
hat it stunned the entire industry. 

Radio, still in its comparative youth, 
; riade a few feeble efforts at ridicule, calling- 
he television men "the magic lantern boys," 
.nd then sat around stunned at its loss of 
isteners until finally, with good sense, it 
tarted to rebuild its medium to fit the needs 
i the public, and today is once more flourish- 
ng and a fine competitor to other advertising 
nedia. Newspapers and magazines remained 
ppalled — but they remained in business. 

Within the last few months the hue 
tnd cry against television has become louder, 
tome publications are seeking to fight this 
lemon who is taking away their advertising 
lollars. The sad thing about it is that they 



are fighting in the same million-year-old way. 
They are attempting to deprecate television 
as an advertising medium. 

We like all advertising. We like 
newspapers, radio, television, magazines, and 
all the others. They are all effective. If a news- 
paper or magazine didn't print what the 
public wants ( be it entertainment or news ) , it 
would not be read. If a radio or television 
station failed to broadcast good programs, it 
would not be watched or heard. The fact is 
that successful newspapers and magazines 
are read — and people do watch television and 
do listen to radio. Without listeners and view- 
ers and readers, they would be without adver- 
tisers, without whom they could not exist. 

All advertising media might well 
follow the proven path of "peaceful co-exist- 
ence," and make sure that they are geared to 
the wants and needs of present-day America 
to the nth degree. Along this path alone lie 
prosperity and success for all. 

Anyway, we have to spend a lot of 
time thinking up all the things we're going 
to say about the next advertising competitor 
—telepathy. That's going to be a pretty cheap 
medium for the advertiser, because anybody 
I with brains, that is ) will be able to get the 
message. 



do you agree? 



tetry & Co., Inc. 



With new emphasis on advertisers' needs, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What are the latest techniques in I 



As advertisers' requirements de- 
mand more, film men report 
new production methods being 
used to secure viewer attention. 

Robert Bergmann, vice president, tv 
division, Transfilm Inc., New York 

Two basic approaches have emerged 
in television commercial treatment 
recently that have had "significant" 
and "novelty" effect — significant 
meaning that one and all among the 







The applica- 
tion of 
graphics to 
commercials 



viewers have enjoyed them and agree 
that more of this kind should be 
done; and novelty applied gener- 
ally by the industry meaning that 
"this, too, shall pass." In my opinion 
these techniques will be the basis for 
further development and embroider- 
ing in the future; they will retain 
their "significance" for the viewer; 
and "novelty" won't tarnish. 

The first approach depends on 
heavy investment in character devel- 
opment (Harry and Bert for Piel; 
Marky for Maypo Cereal; Emily Tipp 
for Ward Baking; and Manners, the 
Butler, for Kleenex.) In this style, 
situations of the characters develop 
to involve the product. 

The second approach lies in the ap- 
plication of graphics to the commer- 
cial. Here I refer to animated stills of 
people and art work, or what we have 
termed "visual squeeze," in award- 
winning types as Chemstrand, Ford, 
Aero Shave, Sanka, Esso and Tek 
commercials. Sometimes live action 
is integrated, but always the picture 
syncs to, or is motivated by, an un- 
usual track. 

In the technique of character de- 
velopment, the commercial provides 



identification and humor. The 
groundwork for these off-beat "sells" 
is very carefully prepared at the 
agency level. For example, Ed Graham 
developed biographies for his "differ- 
ent" people. Although Ed has left 
agency copy to devote full time to 
this approach, I feel that the agency 
awareness of this type's effectiveness 
will push it toward giving its own 
creative groups the freedom to spawn 
more "characters." 

For the film producer, the transla- 
tion of these "character" families to 
film is technically no great problem; 
and there is challenge and fun in 
supporting the "characters" with de- 
sign, novel movement and equipping 
them with compelling voices and 
sounds. 

The second approach via graphics 
has revealed its value by forcing peo- 
ple to look and listen at an acceler- 
ated pace, without losing the mes- 
sage, and like it. More than anything 
else, this style is a perfect combina- 
tion of audio and visual. It obeys the 
laws of the film — attempts to say one 
thing only at a time in one picture, 
and depends on the cumulative effect 
of everyone concerned. 

Although they are conceived by 
the tv creative groups within the ad- 
vertising agency, it is the film com- 
pany which provides the kitchen to 
unite the ingredients — music, still 
photographer, graphic artist, and ani- 
mation department. Because agen- 
cies, I feel, are becoming more sensi- 
tive to this style, many new areas will 
be explored and attempted in this 
coming year — the surface hasn't even 
been scratched. 

In both the basic approaches that 
I have described, the film company — 
because it is not merely the "printer" 
of the commercial, but an imagina- 
tive, helpful, crystalizing force — can 
give immense support to the agency 
creative levels, allowing them to ex- 
press themselves more satisfactorily 
for their clients. 

Neither of these techniques is pur- 



chased cheaply. They require a great 
deal of thought, the most intense co- 
operation of all forces, thorough sup- 
port at all levels of agency and client. 
The result is not only effectiveness, 
interest and even entertainment, but 
the insurance that they can be seen 
again and again and still not wear 
out their welcome in the viewer's 
home. 

Jerry Schnitzer, executive producer, 
Robert Lawrence Productions 

We are using our best efforts to 
make the television viewer a partici- 
pant instead of a spectator. This em- 
bodies a technique that makes the 
viewer a living part of the adver- 
tiser's message. It makes the viewer 
experience what the actor feels. 
Forces him into the picture. Not with 
words alone, but with pictures pri- 
marily. Strong pictures; pictures that 
invite his participation. 

There is no secret formula to this 
technique, nor would you call it a 



A constant 
flow of 
cause and 
effect 



new one. It is the manner in which 
it is developed and brought out by 
the combined efforts of the agency 
and the producing company. It is 
basically an attitude about film mak- 
ing. It is an attitude about life itself. 
It is an awareness that both the 
viewer and the actor wish to com- 
municate to each other. To give it a 
name, we call it "non-verbal com- 
munication". 

Film-making, as we know it, is 
built upon a system of reactions — a 
constant flow of cause and effect ad- 
vancing the over-all action, leaving 
emotional recordings on people's 
faces. It is in these recordings, these \ 




56 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 i 



tv film? 



i shadings, mostly the non-verbal, tell- 
tale responses, that communicate 
with such impact that the viewer is 
motivated to action. These flashes of 
revelation cannot be described by 
words. They are for the camera and 
the eyes of the viewer to receive and 
understand. 

Some of the commercials in which 
we have successfully used this tech- 
nique are Chevrolet ("Going to the 
Dance" and "Station Wagon") Max 
Factor and Gallo Wine. There is no 
limit to the variety of the applica- 
tions of "non-verbal communication." 
Those little unwritten feelings com- 
municate best when they are etched 
on our faces and in our carriage. 
They establish rapport between the 
actor and the product and conse- 
quently with the viewer and product. 

Gerald Hirschfeld, A.S.C., vice presi- 
dent, director of photography, MPO Tele- 
vision Films, Inc., New York 

Television viewers and even critics 
have commented on the steady in- 
crease in the quality of filmed com- 
mercials over the last few years. This 
achievement, to a great degree, is the 
result of a series of new techniques 
developed to meet the demands of 
commercial film production. 

In general, commercials became 
much more complicated in concep- 
tion and execution over the last year. 
The film producer has been called 
upon to provide greater and greater 
skill to meet the needs of the adver- 



MPO process 
superimposes 
product in 
action 



tising agencies and their clients. One 
area which has been and will con- 
tinue to be specially important is the 
field of special effects. More and 
[Please turn to page 63) 





SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



57 



BEFORE YOU BUY 

ANY RADIO 
IN SAN ANTONIO 



2 ( j : </. 

"695;#41//»37., 

84$ & 93?. 6 £+16 1 
005— /17567;0-4P: 

'oCte'-210i(:'x) .337' 

: 5#**148S3S9364: : £#14 

. .853601/?. .5211:igf 42 1 

00982457 (9x. .3b) 3370* 

04972$. .790000— •&": 8?. 

74-ixy _. . 99^ 



Let the facts on San Antonio's 
radio market speak for them- 
selves ... in one of the industry's 
most searching reports on pur- 
chasing power of San Antonio's 
radio audiences . . . based on 
FACTS compiled by PULSE. Get a 
a free copy BEFORE you buy 
another spot. No obligation, of 
course. Ask for 

"An Evaluation of Radio 
Audience Purchasing 
Power in San Antonio" 



H-R 



4$$S 



See your || " n representative 
or Clarke Brown man 

or write direct to 



KONO 



JACK ROTH, Manager 

P. O. Box 2338 
San Antonio 6, Texas 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Lever Bros. Co., New York, is initiating a big push in 75 markets 
for its Silver Dust Blue; last year's broadcast budget was mostly in 
spot radio. Schedules start the last of this month and in February. 
The smaller markets are short-term, but many of the major markets 
run for 52 weeks. Minutes and 20's during daytime periods are 
being placed; frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is Ira 
Gonsier; the agency is Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc., 
New York. 

Culf Oil Corp., Pittsburgh, is kicking off a campaign in 75 markets 
for its gasolines. The schedules start this month, run for five weeks. 
Minutes and 20's in prime time are being slotted. Frequencies vary 
from market to market. The buyer is Frank Grady; the agency is 
Young & Rubicam, Inc., New York. 

Whitehall Laboratories, Div. of American Home Products Corp., 
is beefing up its existing schedules throughout the country for its 
Anacin and Preparation H. New schedules start this month for 52 
weeks; minutes and 20's are being used. Frequencies depend upon 
the market. The buyer is Jim Curran; the agency is Ted Bates & 
Co., New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, is going into top markets with 
sports' shows to push its Palmolive men's line. The 52-week sched- 
ules start this month. Five, 10- and 15-minute segments are being 
used. The buyer is Eileen Greer; the agency is Ted Bates, N. Y. 

RADIO BUYS 

Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich., is preparing a campaign in top 
markets throughout the country for its automobiles. The schedules 
start in February for three weeks. Minutes during traffic segments 
are being placed; frequency depends upon the market. The head 
buyer is Dick Vorce; the agency is J. Walter Thompson Co., New 
York. 

Monarch Wine Co., Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., is lining up schedules 
in various markets for its Manischewitz Wine. The campaign starts 
the second week in February, runs for seven to 10 weeks, depending 
upon the market. Minutes during daytime slots are being purchased; 
frequencies vary from market to market. The buyer is Gale Myers; 
the agency is Lawrence C. Gumbinner Advertising Agency, N. Y. 

American Home Foods, Div. of American Home Products Corp., 
is going into major markets for its Burnett's Vanilla. The schedules 
start this month, run for 13 weeks. I.D.'s during daytime segments 
are being slotted. Average frequency: 15 per week per market. The 
buyer is Ed Richardson; the agency is Geyer, Morey, Madden & 
Ballard, Inc., New York. 



58 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



In Omaha.... 







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Latest ARB* proves KETV delivers 
Omaha's largest audience in prime 
viewing hours! 

Here are the facts! 

One-Week Four-Week 

KETV 42.4 KETV 36.2 



station B 27.2 

station C 30.4 



station B 31.8 

station C 31.7 



* Omaha Metropolitan One- Week, Four- Week ARB, November '58 
6 P.M. — Midnight, Sunday — Saturday, share of Audience. 

Act promptly to buy minutes and breaks with 

ratings averaging in the upper 20's and 30's 

adjacent to leading ABC-TV network shows 

and Omaha's highest rated movies. 



Contact your 



Ben H. Cowdery, President 

Eugene S. Thomas, V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 




man today 



ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 



Omaha World-Herald Station 



K 




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7 



SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



59 




Look who's advertising on TV now ! 

Local businessmen - most of whom never could afford spot commercials until the advent of Ampex 

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reach of almost everyone. 

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Opening new retail markets and expanding income potentials for stations are just two of many benefits of 

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professional 
products division 



60 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



COUPONING 

(Cont'd from page 371 

history to a coupon. Purpose: to 
get more names in dealers' files. The 
device: a 79c value coupon thai could 
be obtained only at a Texaco dealer. 
Mailed with 50c. it returned a 7-inch 
record, Benny Goodman's Swing into 
Spring, made for Texaco by Colum- 
bia Records. Promotion was kicked 
off with an hour-long show of that 
title on NBC TV. followed by a four- 
week flight of radio and tv spots in 
85 markets. 

Of the five program commercials, 
two plugged the deal. Similar com- 
mercials were used in the spot cam- 
paign that followed. "Demonstra- 
tion was the main value of these com- 
mercials." says Tom Fielder. Cun- 
ningham & Walsh marketing/mer- 
chandising supervisor for Texaco. 
"Not only could we show the coupon. 
but an exact re-enactment of the 
customer's part and the dealer's part 
in the whole transaction was possible. 

"This had several benefits. It 
served as an action guide for the cus- 
tomer and gave each dealer an un- 
derstanding and appreciation of his 
role in the promotion. With 38.000 
dealers — this was important." 

The 60-second tv commercial was 
slotted in prime time. 30s and 60s 
were used on radio — prime time, 
nighttime, all times, according to 
C&W broadcast supervisor for Tex- 
aco. Jerry Sprague. except when the 
audience was predominantly house- 
wife. This points up the impulse 
values of radio in the campaign, with 
concentration on a moving audience 
that might be passing Texaco sta- 
tions. 

These varied tv and radio aims in 
the campaign highlight what C&W 
marketing director Art Felton feels 
about the support of couponing: 
["Couponing tied in with a contest, a 
promotion, or a premium must be 
Strongly integrated with your adver- 
tising. The Texaco promotion re- 
flects an interworking of sales, media, 
and merchandising." 

Texaco saw a strengthening of 
dealer relationships, as well as busi- 
ness increases, as a result of the pro- 
motion, immediately went ahead with 
a mid-1958 promotion tied to a tour- 
ing booklet, and plans another Swing 
niln Spring show for 1959. ^ 



K&E'S SHERAK 

[Cont'd from page 39) 

admen could come up with answers 
to help evaluate the relative effective- 
ness of ad em ironments in broadcast 
and print media. "We have to move 
in this direction," Sherak said. "We 
are making decisions about commer- 
cial environments now. anyway, only 
we're doing it intuitively." 

As a matter of fact, Sherak was 
confident that eventually admen 
would be able to compare the relative 
strengths of individual media through 
a common measure of the effective- 
ness of individual commercials or 
print ads. 

Getting into the problem of mea- 
suring ad effectiveness by tallying 
sales. Sherak evinced some doubts. 
He said that, in most cases, it's an 
almost impossible job. Where it can 
be done, the problems of controlling 
the innumerable factors that affect 
sales in the markets tested make it 
difficult to get reliable figures. "It's 
much easier to design research to 
control people than to design research 
to control markets. " Sherak said. 

Sherak made clear that, despite the 
agency's drive to get behind the rat- 
ings, basic circulation data for pro- 
grams and stations are still wanted. 
"We want to know the total number 
of homes we are reaching, not merely 
the number of homes in some arbi- 
trary rating area." 

K&E uses NCS data to get the 
"where" information and to project 
ratings to get total homes reached. 
There is no policy of using cut-off 
points, except in particular cases 
where a client's distribution doesn't 
go beyond a certain area. Sherak sees 
no sense in cut-off points and takes 
the attitude that any home reached 
by a station, no matter where it is 
located, should be counted in estimat- 
ing ratings. In crediting stations with 
NCS audiences, K&E uses average 
evening weekly figures. 

In the absence of more up-to-date 
material. K&E still uses NCS #2 
for radio circulation. WTiile conced- 
ing that a lot has happened to radio 
station audience shares since 1956, 
Sherak believes that the relationship 
between the size of audiences in cen- 
tral and outlying areas probably re- 
mains the same. "At least." he said. 
"this is the best assumption we can 
make." Researchers have to be prac- 
tical, too. ^ 






We taped 
Ramblers 




Doug Elleson, Program Manager 
KRON-TV, San Francisco 

"We taped a whole series of 
Rambler spots at one time for 
local Nash dealers. Accurately 
timed, error-free, easily scheduled 
commercials, with a 'live' look at 
less than live cost, impressed 
both client and agency." 



AWPEX 



CORPORA! ION 



934 CHARTER STREET, REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 



professional 
products division 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



61 



THINGS 



J* 





ARE POPPING 



WBZ's got Ifle town jumping. With exciting new ideas. 
Like the Sunday Afternoon Popularity Parade. Bright and 
bouncy, it spotlights each one of the station's popular 
deejays. Like the new Saturday Night Club. A unique 
approach to live record parties, with tight production and 
timely news specials. Light, lively, listenable . . . that's the 
new §0imd that's catching the crowds on Boston's Most 
PopiMar Station. 




I S1.000 WAITS 



*%nt\ o 



1030 

IOSTON 



, WBZA SPRINGFIELD 



Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc. 



v_y 




WBNS Radio 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Blair & Co., Representatives 




We have 81% renewal of local ac- 
counts with 82% oi our subscribers 
being on the air from 5 to 27 years 
ivithout interruption. 



ALCOA 

{Cont'd from page 41) 

dicated for greater diversification, 
different regional and seasonal ap- 
proaches." 

Still another reason: the Alcoa 
customer with a local selling problem 
will of course require a single-market 
buy to solve it, and in some cases 
Alcoa will provide this individual 
support. 

Once the type of buy has been de- 
cided, how do you sell it on the local 
level to dealers? Obviously, strong 
merchandising to the dealers is im- 
portant. Alcoa's field promotion man- 
agers will be contacting them far in 
advance of each promotion, pointing 
out the benefits of the cut-ins, advis- 
ing them on how best to slant their 
pitch to tie-in with what's being done 
locally or nationally, as the case may 
be. In some cases, it's a trade-directed 
pitch to the consumer: "get your 
builder to order these Alcoa prod- 
ucts available at. . . ." 

This method of talking to the trade 
"over the shoulder" of the consumer 
provides a stimulus to Alcoa's year- 
round effort to reach both its manu- 
facturing customers and their dealer 
outlets. 

Stations welcome the chance to go 
in and see these dealers, many of 
whom they normally would have no 
reason to contact. Alcoa used NBC's 
closed-circuit sales meeting plan for 
getting to potential boating dealers. 
Dealers in each city were invited to 
listen to a pitch from Alcoa and the 
network beamed from New York. 

Alcoa works with its customers as 
well as its customers' dealers. It sug- 
gests ways that the customer can tie 
his advertising to the over-all Alcoa 
promotions. Customer advertising by 
Alcoa on tv will use the same sea- 
sonal themes as the radio promotions. 
Copy promoting its customers' prod- 
ucts is used on Alcoa Theater, alter- 
nating with Goodyear on NBC, and 
Alcoa Presents, which kicked off 20 
January on ABC TV. 

Alcoa sells few products direct to 
consumer (its only consumer prod- 
ucts are: Alcoa Wrap, gutters and 
downspouts and three farm products: 
roofing, irrigation pipe and farm 
gates). So this elaborate promotion- 
al plan has been devised to fit its own 
customer setup. But what Alcoa de- 
velops in the months ahead could 
have far-reaching effects on national 
and spot radio. ^ 



62 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Cont'd from page 57 I 

more often the film producer is called 
upon to achieve elaborate trick shots. 
high speed photograph) and zoom 
shots. 

In commercial*, of course, the 
product is the star and a close-up of 
a box of soap flakes is as crucial as 
the glamour shot of the movie queen. 
MPO has developed special insert 
stage equipment and techniques for 
the most efficient and effective hand- 
ling of these extreme close-ups. 

One of our most significant techni- 
cal advances in 1958 was the MPO 
infra-red. self-matting process. This 
technique, exclusive to MPO in the 
East enables the product or cast to 
be superimposed in action on any 
background. Conversely, it enables 
the background to change with con- 
tinuous action in the foreground. 
This is a distinct advantage over the 
cumbersome rear-projection and trav- 
eling matte techniques which have 
been in use in the past. Client re- 
action to this process has been so 
gratifying during the last few months 
that we expect a significant percent- 
age of our 1959 commercials to em- 
ploy this process. 

Another technical advance has 
been the adaptation of the ultra- 
violet (black light i technique to film 
commercials. We have done this both 
in black-and-white and color. This 
technique allows clothing to be worn 
or products to be handled by people 
invisible to the viewer. 

The process of improving existing 
techniques and developing new ones 
is one which must be an important 
part of the business today. In coop- 
eration with our cameramen, direc- 
tors, engineering and art departments 
and the entire MPO staff we are cur- 
rently engaged in designing equip- 
ment and lenses to further glamour- 
ize the star of television commercials 
. . . the product. 

In line with this, it is the respon- 
sibility of the film producer to keep 
agencies and advertisers aware of the 
latest commercial filming technique. 
As part of a continuing series of 
demonstration sessions. MPO Presi- 
dent Judd L. Pollock and myself will 
demonstrate the MPO infra-red, self- 
matting process for the association of 
Agency-Tv producers in Chicago, 
Wednesday. 28 January. ^ 



Announcing the formation of 

ARKWRIGHT 

ADVERTISING CO., INC. 



65 EAST 55th STREET 

NEW YORK 2 2, N.Y. 

PLAZA 1-551 5 



JERRY BESS 

Executive Vice-President 

JAMES HACKETT 

Media Director 



JACK WILCHER 

Vice-President 

THOMAS MANNOS 

Radio-TV Prod., Director 



Servicing the following accounts. 



Robert Hall Clothes 

Chief Apparel 

The American Male 

Comark Plastics 



Abelsons Jewelers 
Meadow Sportswear 
West Coast Slacks 
Stanley Blacker Associates 



West Coast Office: 

6801 Hollywood Blvd 
Hollywood, California 



Richard Westman, 

MANAGER 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



63 



BUILT 
FOR 

GREATER 
VALUE 




WRC-TV's new rate structure* offers Washington advertisers the best dollar value in the station 
history. Television viewing in the Capital today is a quarter again as large as it was in 1955 whi 
rates have increased only slightly. A comparison of the new rate structure and the increased T 
viewing shoivs that WRC-TV now penetrates a 26.3% larger potential audience at an 11% lower cost p 
thousand! Add to this one more fact: The latest seven-month trend of ARB reports (June through Decen 
ber), shows WRC -TV leading all other Washington stations in total weekly share-of-audience ! Washin 
ton is booming. Profits are greater than ever. And WRC -TV can make the most of it. . 
for you! ■ NBC Leadership Station in Washington, B.C. Sold by NBC Spot Sales 

•WRC-TV Rate Card Number 14 



WRC-TV 



24 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



Regardless of slogans and arguments, the fight over exemption of professional 
sports from antitrust laws centers on broadcasting rights. 

Those advocating all-out exemption in bills offered so far this session in the House ap- 
pear of this mind: 

Allowing radio to go on without restraint, but setting up specific ground rules for tv as 
far as sports promotors are concerned. In other words, promotors acting in concert to ban ra- 
dio coverage would still be violating the anti-trust law. However, this could black out an 
area in tv within 75 miles of the sports event. 

Rep. Emanuel Celler (D., N. Y.), chief opponent of the blanket exemption but outvoted 
in the House last year, still wants exemption for practices proven "reasonably necessary" to 
preserve the sports. As chairman of the House Judiciary Committee which must consider the 
bill, he has indicated that he is in no hurry to hold hearings. 

Last year Celler won in his committee — lost on the floor of the House. Over in the Senate 
a Judiciary subcommittee under Sen. Estes Kefauver (D., Tenn.) bottled up the bill. Thus far, 
there is no indication that the climate is any friendlier to it in that group this year. 

Main opposition comes on the grounds that the public would be deprived of broadcasts 
of sports events. Opponents of the bill will want to listen carefully to what broadcasters 
have to say about effects of the compromise before they soften any. 



The administration's budget backs an FTC plan to get tougher with advertising. 

Congress is asked to provide $1,489,000 for investigation and litigation connected with 
deceptive ad practices, up from $1,355,000 actually voted last year. The fiscal 1959 budget 
cut funds for this purpose from $1,396,390 in the preceding year, but fiscal 1960 money re- 
quests not only restore the lost funds but add more. 

The administration in an "economy" budget, also asks an increase for the FCC. 

This agency has $9,759,904 available to it in the current fiscal year. The budget asks for 
$11,000,000 in fiscal 1960 and explains that it wants to cut the time it takes to process ap- 
plications. The FCC wants to increase from 1,169 employees to 1,320. 

The FCC expects an increased workload. It believes that it will be regulating 5.325 
stations by the end of fiscal 1960 compared to 5,105 at the end of this fiscal year. It ex- 
pects to dispose of 842 AM applications for new stations or major facility changes in the 
coming fiscal year, compared to 631 in the current year. Comparable figures for TV are 319 
compared to 274, while FM is expected to stay the same at 391. 



Temperance forces are readying another and bigger attack on Congressional 
unwillingness to ban interstate advertising of alcoholic beverages. 

Rallying point now is pressure for the two Commerce Committees to turn loose of the 
bill so it can be voted upon on the floors of the two chambers. They feel Congressmen 
would be reluctant to go on record against the bill. 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



65 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



24 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A number of film companies are breathing easier ibis week as a result of ex- 
tension of mid-year network contracts for an additional 26 weeks. 

Krafl and Sealtest. for example, gave the green light to Rat Masterson and Old Gold did 
the same for Rough Riders, while Tomhstone Territory which was in a hiatus of uncertain 
duration will now return for Lipton Tea and Philip Morris. 












Stations are showing an increasing tendency to avoid speculations in unspon- 
sored first-run syndicated series. 

A few outlets look askance at programs that don't come in with total sponsorships already 
sold through agencies, and the majority of outlets show varying resistance to programs that 
aren't at least 50% sold. 

The fact that a national or regional advertiser has already bought into part of a show 
makes it easier for the station to sell off the other half to local or national buyers of partici- 
pation and spot. 

Rut many stations have been sorely chagrined when they had to start selling from scratch 
and ended up holding the bag on a long-term programing expense. 

The new attitude towards licensing merchandise at CBS involves treating chil- 
dren's items such as pistols and knives with extreme gentleness because of their 
overtones of violence. 

The new CBS organization for licensing is much like what NRC already has, with the 
merchandising department to be part of CBS Films. 

It appears that CRS is frankly willing to give up some of the profit potential of merchan- 
dising in juvenile items, and will stick to other licenses for their promotional value to 
CBS network and syndicated shows. 

Almost every tv season finds some thumping ratings success in a program with 
especial appeal to juvenile audiences. 

Last season's ratings phenomenon in this department was the Popeye cartoons, and sev- 
eral seasons ago a sure-fire ingredient in local early evening or late afternoon programing 
was Looney Tunes. 

Currently making its bid for this same type of local ratings success is a group of Three 
Stooges farces being handled by Screen Gems. 

Latest ARB reports show ratings performances like these: 



CITY 



Chicago 
Dallas 
Detroit 
Philadelphia 



RATING 

17.3 
15.1 
13.9 
28.0 



STATION AND TIME 



WGN-TV, Mon. thru Fri., 4:30 p.m. 
KFJZ-TV. Mon. thru Fri., 6:30 p.m. 
WXYZ-TV. Mon., Wed., Fri., 6:00 p.m. 
WFIL-TV, Mon. thru Fri., 6:30 p.m.* 



"programed together with other film packages 
Note: However, an important difference between Three Stooges and other programs of 
this type in recent years is that they are flesh-and-blood performers rather than cartoon char- 
acters. Also, as a result of their syndication exposure, they've been booked on several net- 
work variety shows, which in turn has boosted their syndicated schedules. 



6< 



SPONSOR 



24 jainu\ry 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The need for an all-industry committee to promote television was urged by syn- 
dication ehief Mickey Sillerman last week. 

lie pointed to the study <>f tv'a impact on children prepared by Boston University's Foun 
dation for Character Education as one that was virtually ignored l»y the industry despite 
its favorable implications for tv. 

George T. Shupert's appointment this week as v.p. in charge of MGM-TV 
could be a prelude to MGM's entry into syndication on a grand scale. 

Shupert, a veteran in tv film, comes from ARC Films. 

Any of the seven pilots MGM will he shooting in the first quarter of 19.V) that <1<> not re- 
suit in network sales would he ohvious syndication possibilities. 

However, there's this obstacle: MGM-TV is at present geared only for selling shows 
to network advertisers or feature films to stations. 

There are an increasing number of factors in syndication negotiation that in- 
fluence sales which have nothing to do with the show itself. 

Among the client problems and film companv requirements, two factors stand out as in- 
creasingly decisive this season: they are: 

• The client who wants onlv to buv 13 weeks or 13 weeks spread over 26 weeks and 
therefore can't reach the svndicator with a 39-week show. 

• The film company with a quarterly sale* quota that has to reject the meaty re- 
gional offer because it has a delayed starting date. 

While many svndication ratings have a srreat deal to do with network adjacen- 
cies, a number of new wrinkles have develnned lately. 

A case of a syndicated show outrating a successful network adiacencv is in New York, 
for example, where the November-December Nielsen report gave Sea Hunt a 3.5.2 averase to 
a slisrhtly lower 34.5 score for its lead-in. Gunsmoke. 

Bristol-Mvers and Sun Oil Co. sponsor Sea Hunt in New York. 



COMMERCIALS: You can expect the "continental look" to have a key effect 
on the styling and creativity of new film commercials for tv. 

Typical commercials from last vear's Venice showings are now being exhibited bv con- 
sultant Harry Wayne McMahan to agency audiences in cities such as New York and Chicago 
— and it's clear that French. Italian and other nroducers are years ahead in some areas. 

Important differences between IT. S. and European commercials production could result 
in basic influences here, such as these: (l) European commercials are 80% for theatre inter- 
mission and have the benefit of more elaborate and entertaining production. (2) talented small 
producers deal directly with the advertiser in most countries and (3) commercials are de- 
signed to be shown over and over and therefore many have greater interest in repeat 



More and more of the commercials producers equipped for tape are starting 
to roll with orders for new business. 

Termini, for example, which was onlv organized a few months ago. last week delivered its 
first tape commercials for Edsel through Ken von & Eckhardt. 

Film and Commercials Flashes: Screen Gems' Rescue 8 now sold in 142 market* 
. . . Jayark Films appointed Russ Alben ad-promotion manager . . . MPO will produce Coca- 
Cola commercials starrins the McGuire sisters . . . Flamingo will svndicate Deadline . . . 
Dick Lawrence will head Economee Sales . . . Bernard Goodwin resigned from Metropoli- 
tan Broadcasting ... (For details, see FILM WRAP-UP. page 76.) 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 67 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



24 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright I US 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



An agency's faltering record in network tv can make an effective defensive 
weapon. 

It worked this week for the West Coast branch of a New York agency in dissuading a 
juicy durable account from yielding to the rosy talk of a competitor. 



Geritol (Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) may next take a stab at nostalgia via a live 
show linking Guy Lombardo and Don Ameche. 

If the audition made last week proves acceptable, the niche will be 7:30-8 p.m. Mon- 
day on NBC TV. 



One of the giant agencies suddenly has become the object of wholesale account 
sniping by its Madison Avenue brethren. 

The beleagured agency staved off a similar situation some years back when — as now 
— it was going through some major internal realignments. 



That scramble among four top agencies for the New York Stock Exchange ac- 
count is spurred more by the prestige involved than the budget (less than $1 million). 

The contestants: J. Walter Thompson, McCann-Erickson, Y&R, and BBDO. Pres- 
ently the account is with Calkins & Holden, which just merged with Fletcher Richards. 

Also a current target of bidding is the BBDO end of the Vick account. 



Each era of the agency field has been marked by its dynamic salesmen (when it 
comes to pitching for business) as well as its creative geniuses. 

You'll find admen pretty well agreed that the following quintet rates high today on 
the list of client-convincing operators: Marion Harper, Leo Burnett, Barton Cummings. 
Rosser Reeves, and Brown Bolte. 

The upper stratum of a major Chicago agency is so rating-smitten that it has 
tabooed a recommendation from its media-planning people that a campaign be bought on 
every fm station in the country for a product suited to that kind of broadcasting. 

The theory behind the plan: (1) the concept would be a "first," and (2) there would be 
no product competition. 

Retorted the agency's masterminds: If we can't measure it by ratings, it's not what 
we want. 



68 



One of the big laments you continue to hear among admen about what's miss- 
ing in tv measurements: qualitative research on how a program or personality has 
influenced the viewer at the point-of-sale. 

Take a case like this: The sponsor of a variety comedy show knows from various 
field reports that it has contributed tremendously to record sales the last 1958 quar- 
ter. Yet the program fails to get into the top 25 and thus always has two strikes on it. 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 





This is the $2% Billion WSMpire . . 
America's 13th Largest Radio Market 



No national advertising campaign plan can be complete without 
including the WSMpire . . . 

No other combination of media can sell the nation's 13th largest 
radio market as effectively and as economically as WSM . . . 

Strong words . . . but Bob Cooper, or any Blair man, can show facts, 
figures and actual case histories to prove that WSM, single handed- 
ly, delivers a market exceeded in importance by only 12 other areas 
in these United States. 

•Katz Agency Market Study, Broadcasting, December 16, 1957 

WSM Radio 

Key to America's 13th Radio Market 

50,000 Watts* Clear Channel • Blair Represented • Bob Cooper, Gen. Mgr. 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 69 



ADVERTISERS 



Chiquita Banana will be seen and 
heard by more people thi9 year, 
than ever before according to the 
United Fruit Co., and its agency, 
BBDO. 

The latest campaign for the ba- 
nana lady calls for $1 million in spot 
tv in the top 20 markets and radio 
spots in 49 markets. 

Audiences will be urged to hava- 
banana and addabanana via new reci- 
pes and ideas. The tv campaign starts 
9 February, with radio following in 
mid-April. 

Other campaigns and ideas : 

• Applberry, for its sauce and 
strained strawberries and raspber- 
ries, is moving into tv. via spots on 



WCSB-TV, WRCA-TV, WNEW-TV. 
WOR-TV and WP1X, all New York 
stations. Its commercials feature a 
new character. Hector Applberry. 
Agencv. The Rockmore Co., New 
York. 

• Back with the Moylan sisters! 
The youngsters who aired commer- 
cials for Thrivo Dog Food some 20 
years ago are back in radio. Thrivo's 
new campaign includes saturation 
daytime radio spots on some 40 sta- 
tions in 28 cities on the Eastern sea- 
board. Agency, Clements Co., Phila- 
delphia. 

• Westinghouse, to promote its 
new Chantecler, an electric clock- 
radio, is sending to early morning 
broadcasters a "Wake-Up" kit — con- 
sisting of a rooster, whistle. Tang 
instant orange juice, Nescafe instant 
coffee. Pream instant cream and Dev- 
onsheer Melba Toast, wake-up exer- 
cises and directions for running a 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



Airing ihe show from below: Phil McLean ll), d.j. on WERE, Cleveland submerged 
underwater at the Mid-America Boat Show. With him, the show's sporting goods sponsor 
Tom Hudgeons, Jr., demonstrates his commercial: the use of water breathing apparatus 






wake-up contest with a Chantecler as 
top prize. Agency: Grey Advertis- 
ing. 

Con inental Wax Corp., heavy 
users of tv spot, was charged by the 
FTC for misrepresentation. 

The Commission's complaints are 
against Continental's Six Months 
Floor Wax tv commercials, alleging 
that the polish will not last for that 
duration under ordinary circum- 
stances. 

Expansion: The Dumas Milner 
Corp. has purchased Hillcrest Labs 

of Chicago. 

A subsidiary of Spectra Sports- 
wear, Hillcrest manufactures special- 
ty products — principally Yarn-Glo. 



S. Warner Pach succeeds R. Nei- 
son Harris as president of Paper 

Mate, a division of Gillette Co. 

Harris has also resigned as v.p. of 
the Gillette Co., effective 19 March. 

More personnel news: Ralph 
Robertson, appointed director of ad- 








Helping the construction along: d.j. 
Frosty Fowler, of KING, Seattle, trying to 
speed up the completion of a new freeway, 
by telling listeners to dig 10 shovelsful 

Dressed to look like W. C. Fields, this 
staff actor roamed the streets of Pitts- 
burgh to promote WIIC's new Comedy Hall 
of Fame. Actor also visited newspapers 




SPONSOR 



24 January 1959 



vertisinjj at B. T. Babbitt . . . Leslie 
Parkhursl, elected executive v.p. 
and Jerome Gordon I formerl) a 
v.p. at k&El, v.p. in charge of mar- 
keting at A-S-R Products Corp. . . . 
Charles Harding III, assistant di- 
rector of marketing at Paxton & 
Gallagher . . . Franklin Gemuendt, 
co-ordinator of advertising and sales 
promotion for Metropolitan Bottling 
Co. . . . Richard Bailey, director of 
public relations for Burroughs Corp. 
. . . Robert Orser, advertising man- 
ager for the Chain Saw division of 
McCulloch Corp. . . . Clifford Greek, 
to director of marketing for the Eu- 
reka division of Eureka Williams 
Corp. . . . Ronald Lints, named ad- 
vertising manager for Fischer & Por- 
ter Co., Hatboro, Pa. . . . John An- 
gus, to v.p. of the Dolcin Corp. 



AGENCIES 



The pros and cons of all-media 
buying were discussed last week 
by Michael Donovan, v.p. and 
associate media director of B&B. 



and Dr. Seymour Banks, v.p. of 
Leo Burnett, at the RTE3 Semi- 
nar luncheon in New York. 

Donovan took a position in favor 
of all-media buying, saying that this 
man is better equipped to understand 
the marketing situation and thus 
makes the best recommendations. 

"We'd rather that each of our me- 
dia men have a full check of sharp- 
ened tools, than just a screw driver 
or a hammer," concluded Donovan. 

Banks, on the other hand, spoke 
about Burnett's setup of five media 
groups headed by an all-media ac- 
count supervisor, and including spe- 
cialized space and time buyers. 

This specialization, according to 
Banks, gives the space and time men 
an opportunity to keep up with the 
latest developments in their particular 
field. 

Following his speech, Banks was 
asked : "What do you think of the 
new radio-tv development at 
Y&R?" His reply: no comment. 



A working relationship has been 
established between Anderson & 



f urrounded bv his sponsors: Jim Mc- 

I v. -it of CBS TVs The Verdict is 
i ha - the SRO sign on his show, as 

Bow*) by 15 different products around him 





Buried under the mail received J>\ 
WTAE, Pittsburgh, for its ••Three Stooges 
Drawing Contest," are two of the Stooges, 
while the third. Joe ir) looks on. With 
him, Paul Shannon, of 6 p.m. Adventure 

Doing his show from jail: Chuck Hardin, 
d.j. on KWTX, Waco, is attempting to get 
$1,000 "hail money" via his eight hour 
show — all to so to the March of Dimes 



' 03 » 2! JANUARY 1959 




Buy the whole 

TEXAS 

MONEY 

BELT 

and SELL it from 

.he CENTER 




KVKAA 



AM 
TV 



Channel 9 abc 
MONAHANS, TEXAS 



^^ 




v«/ 



See 



Everett McKinney, Inc. 
Clyde Melville, Southwest 
Ross Rucker, Pres. 
Hillman Taylor, TV Manager 
Ken Welch, Radio Manager 

High income, rapid growth, make this a 
market to watch and to buy. You can sell it 
from the center, with 



AM 
TV 



KVKM 

MONAHANS, TEXAS 

71 



Cairns and Botsford, Constantine 
& Gardner. 

Under the agreement. A&C will 
service BC&G in the East, and vice 
versa. 

New agencies: Arkwright Adver- 
tising, at 65 East 55th Street, New 
York, headed by Jack Bess, formerly 
with Frank B. Sawdon. and Jack 
Wilcher, noted for the Robert Hall 
Clothes' "When the values go up, up, 
up" jingle. The agency's latest ap- 
pointment: Robert Hall Clothes, 



for its radio and tv activities in 150 
marK_t . . . Oiero & Winters, at 
9110 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, 
formed by Page Otero and Curtis 
Winters, both formerly executives of 
the McCarty Advertising Agency. 

Agency appoinlments: Vick Prod- 
ucts division of Vick Chemical Co. 
for its Double-Buffered Cold Tablets, 
to Ogilvy, Benson & Mather . . . 
Slenderella International, with a 
chain of 150 salons and a budget of 
$2.5 million, to Product Services, 




Inc. . . . The newly acquired Charles ! 
Antell division of B. T. Babbitt, to 
Babbitt's agency. Brown & Butch- 
er, Inc. . . . Wallace Silversmiths, of 
Wallingford, Conn., to Grey Adver- 
tising . . . The Loretta Young Way, | 
West Coast charm school, to The 
Lansdale Co., Los Angeles . . . The 
Thrivo Co., Philadelphia makers of 
dog food, to The Clements Co., 
also of Philadelphia . . . Cal-Ray Bak- 
eries of Glendale, to Donahue & 
Coe, Los Angeles . . . The Arkansas I 
Rice Growers Cooperative Associa- | 
tion, to Noble-Dury & Assoc. . . . | 
Traub Manufacturing Co., Detroit, 
to Jaqua Advertising . . . White I 
Labs, of Kenilworth, N. J., The 1 
Shaller-Rubin Co., New York . . . I 
Beacon Plastics Corp., of Newton, 
Mass., to Weiss & Geller, Inc. . . . 

Account resignation: The Chevro- 
let Dealer Groups, for local advertis- 
ing in the Eastern region, by Ketch- 
urn, MacLeod & Grove . . . Smith 
Brothers, which has been with 
SSC&B since it started in 1946, is 
leaving the agency to join Kastor, 
Hilton, Chesley Clifford & Ather- 
ton. 



New officers of the League of Ad- 
vertising Agencies : president, Ben 
M. Reiss, president of Friend-Reiss; 
v.p.'s, William Seidenbaum and 
Jay Victor; secretary, Arthur 
Bandman, and treasurer, Ted 
Bernstein. 

New senior v.p.'s and member of 
the board at Mogul, Lewin, Wil- 
liams & Saylor, Inc. : Richard 
Lockman, Seth Tobias, William Ja- 
coby, Myron Mahler, Milton Gutten- 
plan, Charles Rothschild, Walter Pol- 
lock and Alvin Kaplan. Also named 
senior v.p., Alan Green. 

They were named v.p.'s : Richard 
Goebel, at Compton Advertising . . . 
Reginald Dellow, at Grant . . . 
James Watt, Jr., at Y&R . . . Ter- 
rell Van Ingen, at EWR&R . . . Wil- 
liam Lewis, at Geyer, Morey, Mad- 
den & Ballard . . . James Miller, at 
Applestein, Levinstein & Golnick, 
Baltimore. 

People on the move: Randolph 
McKelvey, named manager of Y&R's 
Detroit office . . . Edwin Sonneck- 
en, named president and Nevin Gel- 



72 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 




THIS 



IS 
AMERICA'S 




ST RADIO MARKET 



Big Aggie, queen of WNAX*570's coverage area, 
rules over this prosperous land 



Big Aggie Land, denned and delivered 
by WNAX-570, is the country's 41st 
radio market. This vast, farm-rich 
area includes 175 counties in parts of 
five states, nearly 2% million people 
with over $3 billion in spendable 
income. 



With WNAX-570's uncontested reign 
over these high-income families, Big 
Aggie Land is one of the nation's most 
profitable markets for radio promotion. 

See your KATZ. man for details. 



• 



WNAX-570 CBS RADIO 

YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SIOUX CITY, IOWA 
PROGRAMMING FOR ADULTS OF ALL AGES 



PEOPLES 
BROADCASTING CORP. 

WGAR, Cleveland, Ohio 
WRFD, Worthington, Ohio 
WTTM, Trenton, New Jersey 
WMMN, Fairmont, W. Va. 
WNAX, Yankton, South Dakota 
KVTV, Sioux City, Iowa 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



73 



man, v. p. and general manager of 
Market Planning Corp.. an affiliate 
of McCann-Erickson . . . Gerald 
Pickman, to director of marketing 
and research for Kudner . . . Ralph 
Smi'.h and Richard Wylly, elected 
directors of SSC&B . . . James Au- 
brey, board chairman and chief offi- 
cer of Aubrey. Finlay. Marley & 
Hodgson, Chicago, to senior consult- 
ant . . . John Roche, to director of 
the copy department; Josephine 
Walsh, to assistant director of copy; 
Theodore Simpson, to head the 
newly formed creative-contact depart- 
ment and Gene Hahnel, co-director 
at Gardner Advertising. St. Louis. 

Other personnel appointments: 
Wirt McClintic Mitchell, named 
chairman to coordinate art and copy 
activities at Geyer, Morey, Madden 
& Ballard . . . Arthur Poretz, to di- 
rector of public relations at Mogul. 
Lewin. Williams & Saylor . . . Noel 
O'Daniell, to account executive at 
Connor Associates, Inc., Aurora, 111. 
. . . John Meskill, associate media 
director at Marschalk & Pratt . . . 
Dr. Norman Young, to research di- 
rector and Nancyann Graham, di- 
rector of home economics at Mogul, 
Lewin. Williams & Saylor. 



FILM 



An ambitious schedule for film 
production and distribution is 
being posted by increasing num- 
bers of film companies for 1959. 

These were among last week's de- 
velopments and announcements in 
that area: 

• MGM-TV will put at least seven 
new pilots before the cameras be- 
tween now and March, and construc- 
tion is underway at MGM to enlarge 
and modernize studio facilities. 

• Goodson-Todman will film the 
Philip Marlowe series with William 
Froug as creative head; CNP will 
distribute the show. 

• Jack Chertok will make the 
Barney Ruditsky series, and Raylock 
Productions will film Outpost in 
Space ; both will be shot at MGM and 
distributed through CNP. 

• CBS Tv Films has completed 
its pilot for The Lawyer. 

• Fremantle will handle Encyclo- 
pedia Britannica films in Canada. 

• Pyramid Productions will film 



74 



Deadline starring Paul Stewart; Fla- 
mingo will distribute the series. 

Sales: Latest sales of Rescue 8 by 
Screen Gems bring the series into 142 
markets; they are Tasty Baking Co. 
for WBAL-TV, Baltimore, with op- 
tions in Philadelphia and other mar- 
kets; City National Bank and Clark 
Jewelers ' for WKY-TV. Oklahoma 
City; Tide on WCRG-TV in Cedar 
Rapids; also stations WCCO-TV, 
Minnapolis; and WDAF-TV, Kansas 
City . . . CBS Newsfilm adds to its 
subscriber list KDKA-TV, Pitts- 
burgh; WTEN-TV, Albany, N. Y.; 
and WHCT-TV, Hartford; new over- 
seas subscribers include services in 
Warsaw and Zurich with renewals in 
Algeria and Sweden. 

More Sales: MGM Our Gang come- 
dies and other short subjects plus 
feature films sold or optioned to 
KRTV, Great Falls; KFDM-TV. Beau- 
mont; WDSU-TV, New Orleans; 
WTIC-TV, Hartford; WTEN-TV, Al- 
bany, and KPAC-TV. Port Arthur 
. . . UAA reports sales of feature 
films, Popeye cartoons and other 
film product to WBKW-TV, Buffalo; 
WJRT-TV. Flint; WTVR, Richmond; 
KCRG-TV, Cedar Rapids; WAFB- 
TV. Baton Rouge; KOMO-TV, Seat- 
tle; KGBT-TV, Harlingen; WMT-TV, 
Cedar Rapids; WHO-TV, Des Moines; 
WM AZ-TV, Macon ; KTUL-TV, Tulsa ; 
KVOA-TV, Tucson; KVII-TV, Ama- 
rillo; KOOL-TV. Phoenix, and 
KABC-TV, Los Angeles . . . KHJ-TV. 
Los Angeles, purchased the RKO 
Showcase Package. 

More distribution plans: Rich- 
ard Ullman, of Miami, Fla., is dis- 
tributing animated space adventures 
of Colonel Bleep and Watch the 
Birdie series . . . ABC Films placed 
Festival 35 package of J. Arthur 
Rank films on sale. 

Upcoming production: Formula 
7 Productions of New York City 
has entered live tv production and tv 
and features film production fields 
. . . Star of Cincinnati music series 
Colin Male prepared a tape audition 
for ABC TV. 

Commercials : New Telestudios tape 
clients include Florida Citrus Com- 
mission through Benton and Bowles 
and Julius Kayser Ltd. through Dan- 



How about; 

ALASKA? 



Mow will your message col 
through in those faraway srj 
beyond the suburbs? An ivl 
tower is a sure road to nowhel 
Pre-testing becomes more 
more vital as costs grow. 

And film makes pre-tes 
easy . . . lets you use impar 
audiences where and when 
want . . . lets you test to y 
heart's content . . . economicc 

Actually, film does three thi 
for you ... 3 big important thii 

1. Gives you the high-p< 
commercials you've com 
expect . . . fluff-free . . . 

2. Gives you coverage 
full pre-test opportunity 

3. Retains residual values! 

For more information write: 
Motion Picture Film Departr 
EASTMAN KODAK COMP/ 
Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division 

342 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N.Y. 

Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 
Chicago 1 , III. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 



W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and 
distribution of Eastman 
Professional Motion Picture 
Films. Fort Lee, N.J.; 
Chicago, III.; 
Hollywood, Calif. 





A/ways shoof it on EASTMAN FILM . . . You'll be glad you did' 



iel and Charles . . . Gordon Weisen- 
born has become associated with 
Fred Niles of Chicago for special pro- 
duction assignments . . . Alan Alch 
of Hollywood will create and produce 
spots for Blitz Beer of Portland 
through Weiner and Gossage agency 
of San Francisco. 

SMPTE Note: Lectures on sound 
recording will be held for SMPTE 
members and non-members in New 
York. 

Strictly personnel: Dick Law- 



rence becomes general sales manager 
of Economee Television Programs, 
the Ziv division under Pierre Weis 
. . . Shifts in stockholder identity 
have resulted in the resignation of 
Bernard Goodwin as president and 
director of Metropolitan Broadcast- 
ing Corporation ( formerly DuMont 
stations) . . . Russ Alben becomes 
new manager of Jayark Films' adver- 
tising-promotion department to han- 
dle Bozo the Clown programs and 
merchandising . . . Barry Winton 
joins Official Films as Baltimore rep- 
resentative. 



a M&Wplus market 

The *t mm ma em 

Albany — Schenectady — Troy 





Exclusive ABC for most of its coverage. 
Investigate . . . write, wire or phone 
todayl 



THIS NEW STATION 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

is engineered to deliver the market 
covering eastern New York, western 
Massachusetts and parts of Vermont 
and New Hampshire. It provides a 
sales potential of 53,495,571,000.00 
consumer spendable income. And 
that's cash register money! Food sales 
alone are over S615 million; drugs 
over S72 million. 



Represented by VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL, Inc. 



NETWORKS 



NBC Radio this week disclosed 
that it has signed $6.6 million 
wor!h of renewed and new busi- 
ness since 29 October, when CBS 
Radio announced its Program 
Consolidation Plan. 

In terms of net billings the divi- 
sion was as follows: Total renewal 
business, $4,213,583; total new busi- 
ness, $2,383,010. The period: 1 No- 
vember-9 January. 

Among the major buys on the new 
business side were Waberly Bonded 
Fabrics, Lewis-Howe, Mogen David, 
Raybestos, Lever, Renuzit and an au- 
tomotive parts manufacturer. 

Long-term renewers included R. J. 
Reynolds, Sun Oil, B&W, Bristol- 
Myers, Allis-Chalmers, No. American 
Van Lines and Ex-Lax. 

On the tv front: NBC TV in its 
year-end report, states a 13% in- 
crease over its 1957 sales record. 

This 1958 figure, according to chair- 
man Robert Sarnoff, more than dou- 
bled the sales volume of five years 
ago, and entered the fourth quarter 
leading all networks in sponsored eve- 
ning time. 

Network tv business: Alberto- 
Culver, to sponsor Meet McGraw via 
ABC TV . . . Sunbeam Corp. (Perrin- 
Paus), has signed for alternate weeks 
on CBS TV's What's My Line, join- 
ing Kellogg . . . P&G (B&B) is in for 
three NBC TV shows: alternate 
weeks of Dragnet; one-third of Ellery 
Queen; and one-third of Cimarron 
City . . . Two regional sponsors for 
ABC TV: Boyer International Labs, 
for Meet McGraw and Hudson Pulp 
& Paper, for Walt Disney Presents 
. . . Corn Products renewed its sched- 
ule on four NBC TV daytime shows: 
It Could Be You, Queen For A Day, 
Treasure Hunt and The Price Is 
Right. 

Network radio business: The 
Parker Pen Co. has increased its 
time (two segments daily) on Don 
McNeill's Breakfast Club. Other ad- 
vertisers buying into this ABC show 
since the start of this year: Ameri- 
can Home; Beltone Hearing Aid; Ex- 
Lax; General Foods; Gulf Guaranty 
Land & Title; Landers, Frary & 
Clark; Magla Products; Rock of 



76 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



Office sofa — The 

icest things happen 

hen you buy time 

on KYW Radio, 

Cleveland 




S> WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



FOOD FAIR 

PROPERTIES PICKS 

JACKSONVILLE 




Ralph Biernbauni. Vice President and 
General Manager, Food Fair Properties, Inc. 

Food Fair Properties, Inc., has picked 
Jacksonville for a gigantic 41-acre shop- 
ping area — Philips Highway Plaza. The 
faith of America's largest shopping cen- 
ter developers in the State of Florida's 
Gateway City is exceeded only by the 
enthusiasm Jacksonville has shown over 
this recent addition to the rapidly ex- 
panding North Florida economy. 



AND JACKSONVILLE PICKS 
WFGA-TV 
I In Jacksonville, Jaxons have picked 
| WFGA-TV, Channel 12 as the best 
I family station in the huge $l'/fc bil- | 
| lion North Florida-South Georgia § 
| market. 

?sss °° ':'''?::„:■ 

Basic NBC and Selected ABC Programming 

Represented nationally by 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



WFG A — TV 

Channel 12 

Jacksonville, Florida 

FLORIDA'S COLORFUL STATION 



Ages Corp.; Russell Spruance Co.; 
and Standard Brands. 

Network affiliations: WKINE, 

Keene, N. H., switched from CBS to 
NBC Radio last week. It had been a 
CBS affiliate for 21 years . . . WDSM, 
Duluth-Superior, to NBC Radio. 

Thisa 'n' data: Mutual this week 
initiated a regional news feeding 
service to its 453 affiliated stations 
. . . On the special front : over 
NBC TV, Some of Manie's Friends, 
a tribute to the late Emanuel Sacks, 
former head of Columbia Records 
and RCA Records, programing head 
of NBC and staff v.p. of RCA. Lig- 
gett & Myers (McCann-Erickson) will 
sponsor this hour and one-half special 
on Tuesday, 3 March. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Continuing the hattle for radio's 
right to air legislative session: 

WADK, Newport, R. I., was the 
victor in an hour long debate with 
the City Council last week, over the 
station's right to tape record the 



WWIN, Baltimore, has embarked 
on a promotion campaign which 
relates the role it now plays in 
radio — the personal medium — 
to the great services that radio 
has performed from its incep- 
tion. 

The effect : identity of a compara- 
tively new station not only with the 
medium's distinguished past but with 
the newer forms of radio program- 
ing technique. 

WOOD, Grand Rapids, has issued 
a news letter to agencies and adver- 
tisers describing the effects of a 41- 
day newspaper strike on food and 
chain department stores business. 

The highlights of this survey — 
conducted by the station among lo- 
cal merchants: 

• Every company but one said 
business was better during this period 
than the same time a year ago. 

• The strike proved that no adver- 
tising medium was indispensable to 
business, and that several alternatives 
exist. 

• All agreed that newspapers were 
most missed for advertising special 
or promotional items. 



WMAR-TV 
SUCCESS STORY . 



New England Confectionery 

Company 

*naJirrA of fin* ea ric/ies since AW7 

25-4 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, 
CAMBRIDGE 39 MASS USA. 



Kecco 



C. S. IIIIL 

Bolt. mora 21, Maryland 



December 30, 1958 
Mr. Tony Picha 

Promotion & Publicity Manager 
WMAR-TV— Sun Square 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Dear Tony: 

In cheaking over my records, I thought 
you would like to know what WMAR-TV 
has done to improve the sale of 
Necco products being featured in spot 
commercials on your programs. 
For your edification, as well as my own, 
I have spent considerable time working out 
an analysis of sales on Rolo and Sky Bar 
to our 57 direct buying accounts who 
distribute these types of products 
in the Baltimore area. 

The sales analysis referred to above 

was based on the period September through 

December, 1957 (no television), versus 

September through December, 1958 

(WMAR-TV television). During the above 

stated period, sales on Rolo showed a 

phenomenal increase of 400.68% in 1958 

over 1957. Sky Bar sales realized 

a 37.01% increase on the same 

comparative basis as hitherto stated. 

As Sky Bar has been well established on 

the local market, it cauld not be 

expected to show a markedly heavy sales 

increase as has been the case with 

a comparatively new proc'u:t such as Rolo. 

Sky Bar and Rolo are highly regarded 
by our direct buying accounts as to having 
excellent consumer acceptance. 
Nevertheless, in some manner we had 
to get a message to the consumer as to 
the appeal of subject products. Thus, I feel 
our recent improved success with Rolo 
and Sky Bar is attributed mainly to adver- 
tising through the medium of television. 

I should like to thank you for the 
sales promotion and cooperation you have 
given my Company in conjunction with 
our advertising. Best wishes in all your 
activities during the coming year. 



Very truly yours 

.A) ' 



c (?-< 



CSB:pb 



New England Confectionery Co 




WMAR-TV 

Sunpapers Television 
Channel 1 

Baltimore 3, Maryland 
"MARYLAND'S PIONEER 
TELEVISION STATION' 

THE KATZ AGENCY 



m 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



77 



Ideas at work: 

• A new year, a new promotion: 
KYA, San Francisco, ended its treas- 
ure hunt last week, awarding $50,000 
to the winner. Station reports the 
campaign turned out to be the big- 
gest in its history, with more than 
100.000 listeners searching for the 
money during one weekend. 

• Make a call anywhere on the 
globe: this was the theme of a spot 
promotion developed by Applestein, 
Levinstein & Golnick. Baltimore agen- 
cy for the Globe Brewing Co., for its 
holiday announcements on WCAO, 



Baltimore. Brewery plans to renew 
offer on upcoming holidays. 

• Radio Moscow: The name for 
a new series of programs on WBT, 
Charlotte. They will consist of re- 
broadcasts of recordings of portions 
of English language broadcasts by 
Radio Moscow, followed by commen- 
tary from station's newsmen. 

• Gone are the days: KGBT, 
Harlingen, Texas, sent a document 
to KFQD. Anchorage, Alaska, relin- 
quishing its title of "the biggest radio 
station in the largest state." 

• What's the good word? The an- 



Budweiser's Dollar buys More 

on WKOW 




Thank you, Harry Renfro of 
D'Arcy for the opportunity 
to prove that WKOW is 
"First in selling a buying 
Madison and Southern Wis- 



consin. 



Ben Hovel 
General Manager 



". . . . with on-the-spot, hard- 
hitting merchandising that 
paid off. Personal calls and 
mailings to every area tav- 
ern, liquor and grocery store 
by WKOW's dynamic Mer- 
chandising Director Jim Mil- 
er . . . more than double 
the number of 'Pick a Pair' 
action displays put up than 
we hoped for. . . . 

"This kind of selling help 
from 'Wisconsin's Most Pow- 
erful Radio Station' gave us 
the extra strength we needed 
for real market penetra- 
tion. . . ." 

Al Frank 

Frank Beer Distributors, Inc. 

BUDWEISER BEER 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



RADI0 10 KW at 1070 
TV Q 



swer should be the one selected by 
KREM, Spokane, in its campaign to 
promote community courtesy. Sta- 
tion selects a good word, like "Smile" 
and gives cash to people answering 
the phone with it. 

• No fish stories here: WCCO, 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, is looking for 
the ice fishing champions of the 
Northwest. The person catching the 
biggest Northern pike, walleys and 
crappie in the five-state area served 
by WCCO will receive $50 and mer- 
chandise. 

Thisa 'n' data: Lester Johnson 
and Willard Happy, presented with 
wrist watches for their 25th year with 
WFDF, Flint . . . Graham Poyner, i 

v.p. and program manager at WPTF, 
Raleigh, also a 25-year man, and pre- 
cented with a silver bowl . . . Bob 
DeHaven, of WCCO, Minneapolis- 
St. Paul, is leading a group of 76 sta- 
tion listeners on a two-week "Good 
Neighbor Holiday" in Hawaii. 

Add random notes: KOMA, Ok- 
lahoma City, is using the saturation 
technique via outdoor billboards to 
announce its affiliation with NBC . . . 
Eldridge, Inc., Trenton, N. J. agen- 
cy, is promoting advertising via a 
show on WTTM, Trenton, dubbed, 
This Is Advertising. 

Station purchases: WTRX, Bell- 
aire, Ohio, to Frederic Gregg and 
Charles Wright, for $130,000, bro- 
kered by Blackburn & Co. . . . 
WCFV, Clifton Forge, Va., to James 
R. Reese, Jr., for $45,000, brokered 
by Paul H. Chapman Co. 

About power and hours : WFGM, 

Fitchburg, Mass., began 24-hour op- 
eration last week, after some fours 
years of expansion and planning . . 
KGO-FM, San Francisco, completed 
its new antennae and raised its power 
to more than six times its previous 
strength. 

Station staffers: Stanley Spero 
and Robert Forward, named v.p.'s 
in charge of sales and programs re- 
spectively, at KMPC, Los Angeles . . . 
Charles Burge, to general manager 
of KWRE, Warrenton, Mo. . . . Hal 
Sundberg, station manager and Bill 
Mayer, program manager of WMBD, 
Peoria . . . Gihhs Lincoln, to sta- 
tion manager of KING, Seattle . . 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



Leslie Biehl, named executive direc- 
tor KYW-FM, Cleveland . . . Alex 
Cole becomes co-owner of WYFE, 
New Orleans. Bill McMillan, news 
director, KOMA. Oklahoma City . . . 
George Gilbert, account executive, 
WABC, New York . . . Bob Lyte, 
promotion director. WCAR, Detroit 
. . . Robert Nelson, news editor at 
WBZ. Boston . . . John Behnke, pro- 
moted to commercial manager, 
KOMO, Seattle. 

Add personnel appointments: 
Thomas Warner, general manager 
of WJLB. Detroit, named v.p. . . . 
Tom Matts, to news director of 
KBOX. Dallas . . . Joseph Wolf- 
man, sales manager. KSON, San 
Diego . . . Lansdell Anderson, re- 
gional sales manager of Intermoun- 
tain Network . . . Richard Gravel, 
to national sales manager and Her- 
man Kramer, local sales manager 
of WTAG, Worcester. Mass. . . . 
Irvin Boudreau, account executive, 
WDRC, Hartford . . . Mort Stern, 
account executive. WABC, New York 
. . . Jaek Loughmiller, national 
sales supervisor. KNX-CRNP. Los 
Angeles . . . Fred Kaufman, ac- 



Private line— The 

nicest things happen 
when you buy time 
on KYW Radio, 
Cleveland 




count executive, KOMO, Seattle . . . 
Roy Bray, account executive, KFMB, 
San Diego. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Larry Webb, managing director 
of the SRA, in a talk before the 
Oklahoma Broadcasters Associa- 
tion last week, estimated the total 
sales for 1958 as: 

• National Spot Radio — $178 mil- 
lion, an increase of 5'r over 1957. 



• National Spot Tv $330 million, 
an increase of about I2'< over 1957. 

Wild) also guestimated that ^><>t 
tv will show a 10' , increase this year 
over 1958, or a total of $365 million. 

While admitting that National Spot 
Radio didn't fare so well in '58, he 
said he felt that the final figures will 
run slightly ahead of 1957 I he \ear 
National Spot set an all-time high. 

Among the other recent organi- 
zational changes at Edward Pe- 
try: 



^g*? WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 




70 



Of 240 Time Segments . . . Here's the Score 
in Metropolitan Baltimore's Negro Market- 



RADIO 
STATION 


FIRST 


WEBB 


240 


Other 
Station 






(Negro Pulse: Sep.-Oct. 1958) 

WEBB 

Always 

FIRST... 

First ever y minute of the day! 

* * * 

BALTIMORE'S LARGEST DAYTIME STATION 

W-E-B-B 

5,000 WATTS 



1360 on your dial 



Baltimore 16, Maryland 



Represented by 
STARS NATIONAL, INC. 

400 Madison Ave., New York 17 • Phone PLoza 8-0555 



Ernest Jahncke, Jr., to v.p. and as- 
sistant chairman of the board; Betty 
Doyle, to secretary-treasurer. 

Members of the tv plans board : 
Edward Page. Eastern sales manager; 
Robert Hutton, Jr., tv promotion di- 
rector; William Rohn, marketing 
director; George Johannessen, tv re- 
search director; Louis Smith, Chica- 
go sales manager; Richard Hughes, 
Atlanta sales manager; L. D. Lari- 
mer, Los Angeles sales manager; and 
Hugh Kerwin, Dallas sales manager. 

Members of the radio plans 
board : E. E. Eshelman, Eastern sales 
manager; William Steese, promotion 
director; William Rohn; William 
Cartwright, Detroit manager; Wil- 
liam Pipher, Chicago sales manager; 
Lloyd McGovern, San Francisco man- 
ager; and Joseph Sierer, Atlanta 
manager. 

(For details on top echelon changes 
at Petry, see SPONSOR, 10 January, 
page 6.) 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward pre- 
sented, last week, its "Colonel 
and Colonelette of the Year" 
awards for 1958. 

The winners: 

Robert Teter, v.p. and director of 
radio, named "Radio Colonel for 
1958:; John Sias, v.p., "Tv Colonel 
for 1958"; the two secretaries rec- 
ceiving the Colonelette awards were 
Angela Spinelli and Elisabeth Ulbert. 
Also named a Colonette, Frances 
Brune. 

Rep appointments: Adam Young, 
for KUDL, Kansas City . . . George 
P. Hollingbery, for WKIX, 
Raleigh; WTTM, Trenton, N. J.; and 
WHOT, Youngstown, Ohio; WVLK, 
Lexington, Ky.; and WFKY, Frank- 
fort, Ky. . . . H-R Tv, Inc., for WOI- 
TV, Des Moines . . . Richard 
O'Connell, for WIZE, Springfield, 
Ohio . . . McGavren-Quinn, for 
KCCC-TV, Sacramento, to air 15 
February. 

Strictly personnel : Sherman Ad- 
ler, named Midwest director of the 
newly created client relations de- 
partment of CBS TV Spot Sales . . . 
James Smith, assistant to the ex- 
ecutive v.p. and sales manager of 
Adam Young . . . John Wade, to 
the post of director of tv research at 
Avery-Knodel . . . Bob Lefko, ac- 



80 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



count executive at Rambeau, Vance, 
Hopple, Inc. . . . John Markey, to 
Midwest manager, Devney, Inc. 



TV STATIONS 



At Chicago's Broadcast Advertis- 
ing Club luncheon last week, 
Richard Moore, president of 
KTTV, Inc. Los Angeles, gave his 
views on tv's best kept secret: 
the true size of the tv audience. 

Moore suggested that "the light of 
tv has not failed; it has been hidden 
under a bushel." 

That bushel, according to Moore, 
is the tendency to transplant various 
radio practices into tv — like the 
"must-buy" sales policy; and ratings, 
which are "incapable of telling the 
stations, the networks, the agency or 
the advertiser the most important 
thing: how many people watch his 
program." 

He urged adopting a new word 
to replace "ratings'" — "reach" 
for "tv reaches the American public 
in numbers and impact as no other 
medium can." 



Las Vegas— The 

licest things happen 
vhen you buy time 
on KYW Radio, 
Cleveland 




§(S<? WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



Ideas at work : 

• Tv and radio network affili- 
ates in Denver are working together 
to promote Colorado's Centennial 
celebration. What they're out for: to 
bring a maximum number of net- 
work stars to the city during the year. 
Chairman of the radio /tv committee 
for the Centennial: Orville Rennie, of 
KOA. 

• The contest's over: White Front 
Stores of Southern Cal., sponsors of 
The Rams Highlights, via KTTV, 
Los Angeles, helped to form a Junior 
Rams' Fan Club for kids, bringing 
the membership up to 6,000. High- 
light of the club was contest spon- 
sored by the Store, with a college 
scholarship as top prize. 

• See yourself on tv: WAGA-TV, 
Atlanta, constructed a closed-circuit 
tv station in a department store to 
demonstrate its new videotape record- 
er to the public. Passerbys were in- 
terviewed, and minutes later, saw 
themselves on tv. 

Thisa 'n' data: Kroger Co. will be 
a daily feature, in color, on Ruth 
Lyons' 50-50 Club via the Crosley 
Broadcasting tv network — WLW in 
Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus and In- 
dianapolis . . . KCCC-TV, Sacramen- 
to, starts telecasting in two weeks, 
and begins its regular programing 
schedule 15 February. 

Kudos: Jerome Reeves, general 
manager. KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh, 
named "Pittsburgh's Man of the 
Year" by the city's Junior Chamber 
of Commerce . . . WFBC-TV, Green- 
ville, S. C, celebrating its fifth anni- 
versary. 

On the personnel front: Lloyd 
Cooney, named general sales man- 
ager of KSL-TV. Salt Lake City . . . 
Avery Chenoweth, to program di- 
rector of WSAZ-TV, Charleston- 
Huntington . . . Robert Rich, to as- 
sistant manager of WDSM. Superior, 
Wis. . . . John Horn, director of in- 
formation services, WCBS-TV, New 
York . . . Ken Bagwell, to national 
sales manager. WTVJ, Miami . . . 
James Goldsmith, director of sales, 
220 Tv, Inc., St. Louis . . . Edna 
Hanna, to head sales promotion ac- 
tivities at KOMO-TV, Seattle . . . 
Tom Cary, to account executive at 
KMTV, Omaha. ^ 





SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 



81 



IT'S S FACT! 



1859— John H. Gregory discovered the first 
gold lode in Gilpin County, Colorado . . . 
The population of Denver was 4,726! 

1959— Population of the Denver TV cover- 
age area served by Channel 9 is 
1,479,500 people who have a spend- 
able income of $2,803,077,000! 

IT'S ALSO & FSCT! 

One day spot saturation on Channel 9 
for Denver Car dealer resulted in 
42 new car sales in one day. A 
new record! 

Channel 9 personalities promoted kids 
theatre party and outpulled com- 
petition's identical promotion . . . 
same day, same time— two to one! 

THE FACT IS... 

For the best buy in Denver 



KBTV 



CHANNEL 



THE FAMILY STATION 



Join the "Rush To The Rockies' 
Come to Colorado in '59 . . . 



J SStlJ* 



•9 HAVWT ™ V( 

LOOKED UP! 



SPECIALIZED NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 



With 100% Negro programming per- 
sonnel, KPRS is effectively directing 
the buying habits of its vast, faithful 
audience. Your sales message wastes 
neither time nor money in reaching 
the heart of its "preferred" market. 
Buying time on KPRS is like buying 
the only radio station in a community 
of 128,357 active prospects. 



1,000 W. 1590 KC. 

KPRS 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 
For availabilities call Humboldt 3-3100 



Represented Nationally by- 
John E. Pearson Company 




Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Robert A. Schmid joined Headley-Reed 
Co. as a v.p., in the rep firm's New York 
City office. His broadcasting background 
includes the position of administrative v.p. 
in charge of advertising, research and 
public relations, and a member of the 
board at Mutual Broadcasting System; 
v.p. of RKO Teleradio; v.p. and member 
of the board of General Teleradio; and 
v.p. for station relations at NTA Film Network. Schmid now joins 
S. Beeson. president. J. Wrath, exec. v.p. and J. Hardingham, v.p. 

Paul B. Evans has been appointed na- 
tional manager of WIP, Philadelphia. For- 
merly an account executive with WINS, 
New York. Evans has been connected with 
radio since 1950. His other experiences 
included: national spot salesman for Paul 
H. Raymer Co.; NBC Spot Sales in Chi- 
cago, and national sales manager for the 
Storer owned and operated stations. He 
was graduated from Northwestern University in 1948. Evans will 
handle national accounts as liaison between WIP and Edward Petry. 





rfkv* j 



mz to 



John W. Kluge, Washington D. C. owner 
of broadcasting stations, has been elected 
chairman of the board of Metropolitan 
Broadcasting Corp., the successor to Du 
Mont Broadcasting Corp. (Stations WNEW- 
AM & TV, New York; WTTG, Washing- 
ton, and WHK, Cleveland I . Richard D. 
Bucklev, with Metropolitan since 1957, 
was named president and chief executive 
officer. Kluge's varied interests include head of broadcasting corps., 
owner, food brokers, realty co's, trotting stables, an investment co. 




RifjjHaMBijmeMMWWMajl 

■lliltrjl 



Alva R. Hopkins, who retired from RCA 
1 January to enter the management con- 
sultant field, will be a consultant to Ampex 
Corp.'s Professional Products division. 
He will devote a substantial portion of his 
time to Ampex, concentrating on market 
planning for the firm's VR-1000 Videotape 
recorder and other tape recordings. Hop- 
kins' 30 years background with RCA in- 
cluded these positions: senior engineer: commercial, regional and 
general sales manager and manager of the broadcast and tv division. 




I — — 
V * 



JL 



82 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



gives you 



more for your money 

than any other Tulsa advertising medium! 



X&MG- SO,000 WATTS 

TULSA. 0/CLAWOMA 

OS MV/A4 COA/TOUR 740 f.C. 



KANS 



N40. 




ARK. 



These days, astute time-buyers 
(like nearly everyone else!) want 
more for their money. You get it 
when you buy Regional KRMG 
in Tulsa, the rich oil capital of the 
world. KRMG's big coverage, 
audience responsiveness and su- 
perior salesmanship are seen in 
one success story after another. 
Example: a recent one-week pro- 
motion pulled 87,312 postcards! 
More facts? Contact General 
Manager Frank Lane or your 
nearest John Blair representative. 




PRIMARY MARKET DATA 

(Excluding Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area) 

Total 1955 1955 1955 

State Counties Population Radio Families Passenger Cars 

Oklahoma 57 1,573,300 377,600 492,900 

Missouri 13 365,300 115,100 104,100 

Arkansas 12 279,400 82,500 64,300 

Kansas 7 190,100 64,400 68,200 

Texas 4 26,400 8,000 9,100 

Totals 93 2,434,500 747,600 738,600 
Source: Consumer Markets 



The Katz Agency 

■ The Katz Agency 

The Katz Agency 

John Blair & Co. - Blair-TV 

John Blair & Co. 

Meredith Stations Are Affiliated With BETTER HOMES and GARDENS and SUCCESSFUL FARMING Magazines 

SPONSOR • 24 JANUARY 1959 83 




KANSAS CITY 


KCAAO 


KCMO-TV 


SYRACUSE 


WHEN 


WHEN-TV 


PHOENIX 


KPHO 


KPHO-TV 


OMAHA 


WOW 


WOW-TV 


TULSA 


KRAAG 





■ SPONSOR 



A plan for national spot radio 

Beginning with this issue, sponsor is presenting a new $500 
million business plan for the national spot radio industry. 
(See page 31.) 

The plan itself contemplates a series of spot radio activi- 
ties over a period of five years. The goal: to build the 
medium to a half-billion dollar industry by 1963. 

In drawing up this $500 Million Plan, we have relied 
heavily on numerous comments, suggestions and ideas re- 
ceived from members of the advertising and radio worlds. 

We want to acknowledge our debt to them, and we want to 
make clear that without their help, it would have been im- 
possible to suggest this program. At the same time we also 
want to be certain that there be no misunderstanding about 
either the purposes or the origin of what we are proposing. 

The $500 Million Plan is the best series of recommenda- 
tions which the editors of sponsor have been able to make for 
the troubling problems of the radio spot industry. It origin- 
ated in our own offices, and whatever omissions or faults it 
contains should be laid at our door. 

A pattern not a blueprint 

Obviously, no plan such as this can hope to be an exact 
blueprint of all the activities to be followed by individual 
members of the radio spot industry. 

The use of the plan, and its adaptation to local markets 
and situations, will have to rest on the shoulders of station 
operators, station representatives and industry groups. 

Without their cooperation and implementation, the plan 
itself is useless. 

We believe that the future of radio spot is potentially far 
greater than many members of the industry have ever real- 
ized. We feel certain that spot can lead radio back to a major 
place in the advertising world. 

We will welcome comments from advertisers, agencies, 
stations and representatives on the Plan as it unfolds. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Greater awareness 
by buyers and sellers of spot radio time, that the 
medium has certain unique, special advantages 
not provided by any other type of advertising. 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Stimulant: From a press release ol 
the Michigan Cherry Commission— J 
"Maraschino and glace cherries, be] 
ing sweet, are high in energy values. 
In addition, they are bright red in 
color, and everyone knows that red 
is a stimulating hue, say the produol 
ers, so it's entirely possible that the 
cherries have helped speed up the 
U. S. tempo. . . ." In Manhattans, 
naturally. 

Auction: TvB's slogan, "People are 
sold on television," met with reverse 
English down in Huntington, W. Va] 
A 14-year-old girl wrote to WSAZ, 
began her letter, "I am certainly glad 
to hear you sell people on tv. . . 
Probably hoped to put in a bid on 
Elvis. 

Purr-suader: During a recent Truth 
or Consequences (NBC TV), a lion 
broke out of his cage, prowled about 
the set until a quick-thinking staffer 
penciled "SCAT" across a cue card. 
The cat took the cue, loped back to 
his cage. 

Type-casting: Phil Stone of Toron- 
to's CHUM suggests a tv spectacular 
of Romeo and Juliet starring layne 
Mansfield. "Who else," he asks, 
"could lean so well over a balcony?" 

Fan: WNTA-TV, Newark, received 
the following from a woman viewer 
anent its kid show, Junior Town, 
conducted by "Mayor" Fred Sayles — - 
"Please send me a big beautiful pic- 
ture of Mayor Fred Sayles. . . . He is 
my favorite tv star. So how come 
such a sexy guy is wasted on kiddie 
shows? . . . My two-year-old son 
likes to watch Gumby so this gives 
me an excuse to turn the program on 
every day, but the poor kid gets up- 
set when I chase him away from the 
tv when Mayor Fred comes back on. 
Please send the picture soon. Better 
yet, send me Mayor Fred."' 

Table talk: Two cockroaches who 
lived in a tv set went out for dinner 
in a nearby garbage pail. "Did you 
see that Westinghouse commercial on 
tv the other night," asked the one 
cockroach, "that showed the spotless, 
modern kitchen with everything so 
clean and sanitary?" 

"Please," said the other cockroach. 
"Not while I'm eating." 



84 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 



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31 JANUARY 195» 
20< a copy • $3 m ymr 






SPO 



1^ 



OR 




WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




did you know that 

. . . there are 36,000,000 Radios on the road today? 
Kt's 1 million more than there were last year ! Just one more reason why 

Spot Radio is such a powerful sales-maker. 



K08 Albuquerque 

WSB Atlanta 

WGN Chicago 

WFAA Dallas-Ft. Worth 

KOSI Denver 

WANE Fort Wayne 

KPRC Houston 

WISH Indianapolis 

KARK Little Rock 



WINZ Miami 

WISN Milwaukee 

KSTP .... Minneapolis-St. Paul 

WTAR Norfolk 

KFAB Omaha 

WIP Philadelphia 

KPOJ Portland 

WJAR Providence 

WRNL Richmond 

Radio Division 



KCRA Sacramento 

WOAl San Antonio 

KFMB San Diego 

KOBY San Francisco 

KMA Shenandoah 

WNDU South Bend 

KREM Spokane 

WGTO Tampa-Orlando 

KVOO Tulsa 



EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC 

The Original Station Representative 

New York • Chicago • Atlanta • Boston • Dallas • Detroit • Los Angeles • San Francisco • St. Louis 









BEER: AN 
INDUSTRY IN 
FERMENT 

Big changes in beer 
business may create 
new media buying pat- 
terns. PART ONE 

Page 27 



Why radio spot 
must be much 
more competitive 

Page 30 

Chain store 
marketing for 
cigarettes 

Page 34 

Parti-Day sales 
jump-245% 
in 13 weeks 

Page 36 



DIGEST ON PAGE 




TWO 



FIRST PLACE 
BLUE RIBBONS 

titat'i t6e NEW 
KIOA STORY! 



4 





4 

0V 



FIRST IN IOWA 

PROVED BY NEW 70 COUNTY AREA PULSE -NOV., 1958! 

FIRST IN DBS MOINES 

FOR 22 CONSECUTIVE MONTHS ACCORDING TO HOOPER! 

FIRST IN LOWEST COST PER 1,000 

SEE YOUR WEED REPRESENTATIVE FOR FULL INFORMATION. 
HE'LL GIVE YOU PROOF THE NEW KIOA HAS THE LOWEST COST 
PER 1,000 OF ANY MEDIA (AIR OR PRINT!) COVERING THE 
STATE OF IOWA! 



YOUR BLUE RIBBON BUY 



IOWA! 



7<& %w KIOA 



THE STATION THAT IOWA LOVES -BECAUSE WE LOVE IOWA 
940 KC • DES MOINES, IOWA • JIM DOWELl, V.P. And Gen. Mgr. 



I f^fej 




Pedttic ftacUa G>o*fi. 



THE NEW KIOA THE NEW KAKC 

10,000 WATTS • FIRST IN DES MOINES 1,000 WATTS • FIRST IN TULSA 

LESTER KAMIN, PRESIDENT 




Vhen we introduced BOOTS AND SADDLES-THE STORY OF THE FIFTH CAVALRY, the critics cheered 

lie crazy. "Refreshing to see" and "welcome change." Likewise "tops" 

ad "uncommonly good"! J^i Ratings proved that the public was swift 

t agree. What's more, latest ARB figures show B&S reruns shooting 

lies in the competition, market after market. ,?§* BOOTS has won 

i. spurs. It figures to be in the saddle for a long, long time to come. California national productions, inc. 



NBC TELEVISION FILMS A DIVISION OF 

CNP 





© Vol. 13, No. 5 



31 January 1959 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Beer — a business in ferment 

27 P er capita consumption of beers and ales has declined steadily since 
1950: only 234 breweries are in business — but next decade looks good 

Competitive strategy: a "must" for spot radio 

30 Part II °f sponsor's $500 Million Plan to make spot radio a half- 
billion-dollar medium by 1963 stresses need for new competitive strategy 

Osmosis is a new timebuying tactic 

32 D. P. Brother agency in Detroit has its buying team tune throughout 
the day to tape recordings submitted by major-market radio stations 

Philip Morris smokes up chain store storm 

3<f> PM's chain store sales director Bob Larkin hammers away on ideas of 
sound management ; complete store control of inventory, stock, displays 

Parti-Day recap: sales up 245% in 13 weeks 

36 Tv test of new dessert topping in Wisconsin market indicates rate of 
increase may go up even more. Survey shows 60% are award of product 

How imagery-transfer works in reverse 

39 Omaha theater chain lets tv spots supply the primary image which is 
then transferred to newspapers and radio for coordinated impact 

Radio made him most popular packer 

40 Stressing personalities and checker-boarding time periods, local meat 
packer zoomed to top of consumer polls in Washington, D. C. loyalty drive 

Mail poops poor Santa 

4X KTVH, Wichita, Kans. Santa Claus answers 4,135 letters from youngsters 
in 238 towns after only a week of late-night mail-pull mentions on tv 

sponsor asks: How will the end of the "must buy" 
rule affect your station? 

46 With the networks no longer requiring advertisers to purchase mini- 
mum number of stations, station men discuss its effect on affiliates 



FEATURES 

13 Commercial Commentary 

54 Film-Scope 

22 49th and Madison 

5 8 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
58 Picture Wrap-Up 
50 Radio Basics 
56 Sponsor Hears 



17 Sponsor-Scope 

68 Sponsor Speaks 

24 Spot Buys 

68 Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 

42 Tv Results 

66 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

53 Washington Week 



. 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 

W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 

Jack Lindrup 

Gloria Florowitz 

Contributing Editor 

foe Csido 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurtz 
Production, Editor 
Florence B. Hamsher 

Vikki Viskniskki, Asst. 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Dorris Bowers, Administrative Mgr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Laura Datre;>Priscilla Hoff- 
man; Jessie Ritter 



Member of Business Publication* 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Offica 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.', Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20s. Printed in U.S. A 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St. 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 






Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island, Illinois 

47th TV MARKET IN THE U.S 



As Reported in TELEVISION AGE, May 19, 1958 

41 Albany Schenectady-Troy 46 Omaha 

42 Nashville 

43 Champaign 

44 Miami 

45 Sacramento-Stockton 



47 Davenport-Rock Island 



48 Binghamton 

49 Raleigh-Durham 

50 Asheville 



WOC-TV IS No. 1 IN COVERAGE 
IN THIS 47th MARKET 



48 COUNTIES 

Population* 1,727,100 

Homes 556,500 

TV Homes 469,890 

Farm Homes** 97,101 

TV Farm Homes** 54,912 

Effective Buying Income* $2,852,363,000 

Retail Sales* $2,076,120,000 

♦Sales Management's "Survey of Buying Power, 1958" 
**U. S. Census of Agriculture, 1954 



NCS 2 



w 


Col. B. J. Palmer 
President 

Ernest C. Sanders 

Resident Manager 

Pax Shaffer 

Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, 
Inc.; Exclusive National 
Representatives 


THE QUINT CITIES 

DAVENPORT I ^ 
BETTENDORF I 


^ 


ROCK ISLAND j 
MOLINE > ILL. 
EAST MOLINE ' 


channel 


^ 



IOWA 



WISCONSIN 



VAN 
BUflEN I 




ILLINOIS 



WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is part of Central Broadcasting Company which 
also owns and operates WHO-TV and WHO-Radio — Des Moines. 




SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 




"AND NOW TOMORROW" 

55 2°° 

V^X^aAa SHARE 

BOSTON 




"FIVE GRAVES TO CAIRO' 

54 1* 

^^ ■ ■ I SHARE 

LOS ANGELES 




LAST MONTH, LAS 




PARAMOUNT PICTURE! 

MCI 







"FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS" 

81 9°° 

\^ I ■ W SHARE 

SAN FRANCISCO 




tfEEK, LAST NIGHT!.. 

HE TIME 
VER THE U.S.A. 
(ECAUSE OF 

HATING POWER FROM 









"THE CRUSADES" 

52 5 % 

V^^i^V SNARE 

BOSTON 



SOURCE: TRENDEX— January, 1959 

ARB— October, November, 1958 



VARIETY 




i/si 



because it stands to reason 

that all listeners do not prefer the 

same thing. 

Therefore, in order to best 
serve "most of the people most 
of the time," KOA-Radio 
adds variety to every phase of 
broadcasting. 

There's great variety in 
entertainment as KOA combines the 
best of network shows with 
popular local programs. Variety 
in style and presentation 
distinguishes KOA's news 
coverage and public service 
programming. The appeal 
of talented variety in personalities 
is evidenced by KOA's loyal, 
responsive audiences. 

Variety in programming can help 
you sell more effectively, too. 
On KOA-Radio, your sales 
message is unmistakably yours . . . 
individualized and delivered 
to create immediate 
sales action! 



Represented nationally by 

i Henry I. 
Christal Co., Inc. 



KO 

DENVER/ 

One of America's great radio stations 

850 on your dial 
50,000 Watts 







I 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 




Edward R. Murrow 






Seldom has nighttime radio made such a stir as that created 
by CBS Radio's report on "The Business of Sex" on 19 
January. The 55-minute documentary, narrated by Edward 
R. Murrow, triggered reams of newspaper copy, hours of con- 
versation and an attack on the CBS commentator by ISAM. 

The newsmaker: Edward R. Murrow, once described by 
poet Carl Sandburg as "reporter, historian, inquirer, actor, ponderer, 
seeker," has a penchant for delving into controversial matters on the 
air. He has tackled most of the hottest ones, including the late Sen. 
Joseph McCarthy, book censorship, school integration, Israel and 
Algeria. Most of his recent probing has been on tv but the Unit 
One setup under Irving Gitlin's Public Affairs Department at CBS 
Radio has, with Murrow narrating, handled some striking subjects, 
too. These include "The Galindez-Murphy Case: A Chronicle of Ter- 
ror," which dealt with the disap- 
pearance of Dr. Jesus de Galindez, 
Columbia University instructor, an 
outspoken opponent of the Domini- 
can Republic's Trujillo regime, 
and "Who Killed Michael Farm- 
er?" a study of the stabbing of a 
Bronx teenager by juvenile delin- 
quents. 

"The Business of Sex," which 
dealt with the use of call girls to 
nail down business deals by busi- 
ness corporations (big and little) 
probably created more comments 
than any of Miirrow's excursions 
into areas of dispute. Even the 

National Association of Manufacturers got into the act. Taking its 
cue from the New York Journal American, which broadly hinted the 
broadcast was phony, the NAM charged the documentary may have 
been designed to divert attention from the Senate's investigation into 
labor racketeering. 

Except for some brief comments to the press after speaking to a 
New York City police official, Murrow has been keeping quiet. The 
only word from his employer was a wire from CBS public affairs 
chief Sig Mickelson to the Journal American expressing "shock" at 
the paper's assertion the program was false. 

Murrow has been holding the attention of radio/tv audiences since 
1938, when he chartered a 27-seat transport out of Berlin and flew 
to Vienna to broadcast an on-the-scene account of Adolph Hitler's 
Anschluss with Austria. His work on the air has brought him a long 
list of awards, academic honors, no small amount of enmity and a 
handsome dose of respect. ^ 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



NEWSMAKER STATION OF THE WEEK 



. . . in St. Louis witH 

WIL 



BUY Radio when you buy media 
BUY Balaban when you buy radio 
BUY WIL when you buy St. Louis 
and you BUY the people who BUY 

Audience up 900% in Hooper, !30% in Pulse. Billing up 
400%. All over the first 10 months of Balaban Operations! 

WIL KBOX WRIT 

St. Louis Dallas Milwaukee 

THE BALABAN STATIONS 

in tempo with the times 
JOHN F. BOX, JR., Managing Director 
Sold Nationally by Robert E. Eastman 




SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 




1V1 ? who buys Media, 

Is happy to hear 
Commercials within 

An adult atmosphere. 

Most media buyers are interested in 
one thing: results. Certainly there 
are a lot of factors to be considered 
before a selection can be made. Cost 
is important, so are ratings; there's no 
doubt about that. But even a low cost- 
per-thousand can't produce complete 
results unless you're reaching listen- 
ing adults with buying potential. 

For more than 36 years, KHJ Radio, 
Los Angeles, has racked up big results 
for agencies and their clients through 
its foreground sound programming 
policy. With an adult appeal, fore- 
ground sound gains and holds the 
listeners' attention. Consequently 
your message penetrates. And KHJ's 
audiences act on what they hear, as a 
long roster of satisfied advertisers can 
tell you. 

When you want to penetrate the minds 
of the buying adults in America's 
2nd Market choose the mature atmos- 
phere of foreground sound to deliver 
results. 



KHJ 

RADIO 

LOS ANGELES 

1313 North Vine Street 
Hollywood 28, California 
Represented nationally by 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 





Timebuyers 
at work 




Harry Alleva, William Warren, Jackson & Delayney, New York, 
believes that double and triple spotting of one-minute commercials 
on both radio and tv is a bad practice for which buyers are often 
as responsible as the stations. "Too many buyers," Harry says, 
"are influenced by ratings alone. They insist on exposure for their 
clients within high -rated time 
areas that are already overloaded 
with sponsorship. Some stations 
will succumb all too quickly to 
buyer pressure for fear of losing 
the buck, and oblige by creating 
additional minute avails with the 
resultant double and triple spot- 
ting." Harry feels that, in the 
long run, a station loses prestige 
with other buyers, and more im- 
portant, its listeners and viewers. 
And the buyer, he says, has suc- 
ceeded only in airing the client's message with little or no listener 
attention at all. "For a healthier situation," Harry says, "the buyer 
should be on guard against double and triple spotting. On the other 
hand, the station should seriously try to understand the buyer's 
dilemma and recommend other times where there is no crowding." 



Joan Rutman, Grey Advertising Agency, New York, feels that the 
term "traffic hours" for spot radio is greatly misunderstood by 
many agency people and advertisers. "So many of them assume 
that this means 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. only," Joan says. "This 
impression undoubtedly prevails because they are white-collar ori- 
ented and think in terms of a 
work day that starts 9 to 9:30. 
They neglect the thousands of in- 
dustries throughout the country 
where the workers begin their day 
at 8 a.m., or those which operate 
on a shift basis. Consequently, 
they think that an announcement 
at 6 or 6:30 a.m. is too early." 
Also, Joan says, both stations and 
advertisers overlook the workers 
who drive home for lunch. Joan 
points out that while there are no 
figures on these people, there are doubtless millions who fall into 
this category. "Agencies and advertisers should carefully appraise 
the working patterns in each market," Joan says. "In many cases, 
they may be able to increase their frequencies as much as 50%." 




SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



Unlike 
anything you've seen 
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Mtfi 1 ! 




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ARTHUR KENNED 





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IMMY EVERET 
MIKE KELLIN, I 



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On "Rendezvous}' intrigue, romance and 
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based on stories by such distinguished 
authors as Stephen Vincent Benet, John 
Hersey, Reginald Rose, Dylan Thomas. 

No expense has been spared. The series 
stars one of the most brilliant casts 
in television. It's produced by MGM's 
famous Edwin Knopf (Lili, The Valley 
of Decision) and Broadway's Howard 
Erskine (The Desperate Hours and The 
Happiest Millionaire). And directed by 
such talents as Dan Petrie (DuPont 
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(Gunsmoke) . . . Fielder Cook (Patterns). 

Major advertisers -Rheingold Beer, 
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by John E. McMillin 



Commercial 
commentary 



t*f? 



Winston sells good 

After all the outraged hollering against Wins- 
ton for fracturing the English language like no 
cigarette should, it is a real pleasure to report 
that this Reynolds hrand is doing one of the 
nicest selling jobs on tv. 

By nice I mean that unique combination of 
good manners, good humor, creativity, imagina- 
tion, and sales effectiveness that makes for really 
fine advertising. 

In recent weeks I've been watching Garry Moore romp through 
a variety of Winston pitches on his I've Got a Secret show, and I 
think that Garry does on exceptionally smooth and friendly job. 

But the people who really fill me with gaping admiration are 
those writers, arrangers and producers at the Esty agency who are 
responsible for the Winston commercials. 

As an old copywriter, I'd like to pay my respects to a bunch of 
real pros, and say "Congratulations, kids, you're doing fine." 

And to other readers of this column who are tv viewers but not 
necessarily advertising technicians, I suggest that you pay particular 
attention to how Winston does it. 

If you follow Winston over a period of a few weeks, you'll get a 
king-sized, liberal education in what are, and always have been, the 
fundamentals of good advertising. 

Two strikes against them 

Let's start with the simple fact that a cigarette — any cigarette — is 
one of the hardest things in the world to advertise. 

When you're dealing with foods or appliances or automobiles or 
soaps or cosmetics, you usually have some kind of demonstrable 
product difference around which to build your campaign. 

But with cigarettes you're dealing in smoke rings — with ideas so 
ephemeral they vanish before you can put your hand to them. With 
vague elusive things like taste, quality, the integrity of the manu- 
facturer, the fineness of his tobacco. 

But how fine is fine? And what, after all, is quality? And how 
do you measure integrity? And how do you describe taste? 

It's a very tough advertising problem, and one that's further com- 
plicated by the traditions of the tobacco industry. 

Cigarette advertising, in the past, has not always been distin- 
guished by good sense, good taste, or even simple truthfulness. 

The malevolent ghost of the elder G. W. Hill still stirs occasional 
echoes of his old shrieks for Lucky Strikes. And his memory still 
tempts some cigarette advertising men to go all out with wild, hys- 
terical yell-type sells, and even more hysterical claims. 

I'd say that anyone today who attempts to develop a new cigar- 
ette campaign is starting with two strikes against him. And this is 
all the more reason for admiring the Winston job. 

















SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



13 



IT'S S FACT! 



1859— John H.Gregory discovered the first 
gold lode in Gilpin County, Colorodo... 
The population of Denver was 4,726! 

1959— Population of the Denver TV cover- 
age area served by Channel 9 is 
1,479,500 people who hove a spend- 
able income of $2,803,077,000! 

IT'S ALSO fi FACT! 

One day spot saturation on Channel 9 
for Denver Car dealer resulted in 
42 new tar sales in one day. A 
new record! 

Channel 9 personalities promoted kids 
theatre party and outpulled com- 
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same day, same time— two to one! 

THE FACT IS... 

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Join the" Rush To The Rockies" 
Come to Colorado in '59 . . . 



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KPOP's Mid-morning 
Sound Salesman 




THE POPULAR STATION 

5,000 watts Los Angeles 

BROADCAST TIME SALES 

New York • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco 

DORA - CLAYTON 

Atlanta 



14 




Commercial commentary continued 



For Winston, through Esty, has succeeded in creating a distinctive 
image of brand quality, and friendliness, and integrity. And they 
have done this without ever becoming heavy or stuffy or pompous 
or loud. Or without resorting to wild, improbable claims. 

Take the all-important matter of brand distinctiveness. Winston 
advertising looks, seems and sounds different than that of its com- 
petition. 

Winston achieves this effect through the use of some very simple 
slogans and a very catchy theme song. 

When you find yourself clapping out the beat of that tricky Wins- 
ton pause ("good like a slap-slap cigarette should" I you're respond- 
ing to something that is different, original, fresh and new. 

Similarly with the much-discussed slogan itself. Three or four 
years ago, it had reactionary grammarians in a seething stew. 

Today, however, I think most of us can recognize it for what it is 
— a good-natured, good humored, tongue-in-cheek variation that 
laughs at dusty convention, and dares to be odd and different. 

Personally, I think that "Like a cigarette should" has been reform- 
ing the American language, and I believe, in Variety's phrase, that 
the "Republic will stand." 

Young man with a horn 

But it is not merely a tricky tune or an off-beat slogan that makes 
Winston advertising so outstanding. 

What impresses me even more is the wealth of creative variation 
that the Esty people give to the Winston theme, and the obvious fun 
they are getting out of their work. 

Nearly all of us recall Winston's famous truck-driver and con- 
vertible commercial, and most of us can remember a good many 
others, too — the boy and gal at the piano, the young man with the 
horn, dauntless as any Childe Roland, lifting his trumpet to blow 
out the Winston theme song. 

Creativeness, the Winston people seem to be saying, comes easy to 
us, and we're happy to share it with you. 

This generous creative warmth builds, in my opinion, the strong- 
est possible bond of friendship between an advertiser and his cus- 
tomers. It is the best reason I know of for not repeating commercials 
ad infinitum and ad nauseam. 

For, in watching how a really creative advertiser rings the changes 
on a familiar theme, there's- always an element of surprise and de- 
light. You can't help getting the impression that he's a nice guy, 
that the makers of Winston are good and friendly people. 

I wouldn't trade that impression for many millions. 

Moreover, it radiates a kind of warmth about the whole advertis- 
ing job. There's a spirit of youth, a spirit of fun in Winston com- 
mercials. You instinctively feel that both Reynolds and Esty enjoy 
their work. And their enthusiasm is bound to be infectious. 

Something of this same quality pervades nearly every fine adver- 
tising job I know of — The Pepsi spots, the Elgin baby commercial, 
to quote a couple of recent examples. 

It is the quality that makes advertising, at its best, a decent busi- 
ness, a self-respecting business and a fun business too. 

And does it pay off? Well, have you had a look at Winston sales i 
figures recently? ^ 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



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Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. • New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 
16 SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



31 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright IBM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Every sector of tv advertising appears to be on the threshold of the biggest 
boom yet, with complete revision from a buyers' to a sellers' market by the fall. 
These are the signs pointing to the trend: 

• Advertisers already are asking for options on shows with fall starting dates. 

• Madison Avenue agencies report that availabilities for chainbreaks in the top mar- 
kets again have become distressingly tight. 

• Some of the bigger agencies in spot have urged their clients to expedite their cam- 
paign decisions so that they can start lining up their requirements early enough. 

• Network sales the past few weeks have taken on a roaring momentum — just 
like spot — with a number of clients (Kellogg and Philip Morris, to mention a couple) buy- 
ing film shows without first knowing where they're going to be spotted. 

• Detroit is showing indications of coming through soon in a big way with more 
regular network series, specials, and spot flurries. 

• Seasonal advertisers are talking about linking themselves to a continuing vehicle 
in addition to specials (a la Parker Pen with the Breakfast Club). 



There might be a good sales cue in this for stations around the country: 
Coca-Cola has come up with a radio format for its bottlers which entails a night- 
time hour labeled Hi-Fi Club: money prizes are involved. 



William E. (Pete) Matthews, print specialist, this week was moved up at Y&R 
to v.p. and director of media relations. 

The title had been previously held by Peter Levathes, who recently was made admin- 
istration boss of the agency's tv department. 

Under the new setup of media-buying authority, Levathes will negotiate in behalf of the 
media planning committee — for network and syndication time as well as programing. The 
buying of other tv spots will continue to be handled under the media relations director. 



Esty this week termed as quite gratifying the response to its effort to induce ra- 
dio stations to revise their discount structures so that R. J. Reynolds can benefit from 
the fact that it's a super-user of year-around spot schedules. 

The reception to the agency's request via reps turned out thus: 

1) Some stations agreed to establish a maximum 624-time rate. 

2) In some cases stations offered to establish a 1,000-plus rate. 

3) Other stations observed that they were sympathetic with the agency's problem and 
would look into the possibility of adjusting their ratecards. 



Definitely gathering steam is the trend among radio stations to adopt a single rate 
or firm up the groundrules on what constitutes a local retail advertiser. 

Reps who are members of the SRA reported this week that quite a number of their sta- 
tions are about ready to swing to one of the two policies. 

Commented one rep: "All that's needed to set the pattern and solidify the whole indus- 
try toward the single rate is for the three top stations in the top 50 markets to back 
the movement." 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



17 



! ^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

New business in national spot tv was bullish again this week. 

Most of the business from the New York e»d was for one-minute spots on late night 
schedules, indicating that advertisers have about given up their efforts to buy daytime min- 
utes and are switching to other areas. 

The week's call for availabilities included Gleem (Compton), Ipana (DCS&S), and Lip- 
ton (Y&R). Lipton will go five weeks, starting next week; Ipana is geared for a run of 16 
weeks. Unlike the other two, Lipton also is seeking 20-second periods. 

In Chicago: (1) DeSoto (BBDO. Detroit) is looking for availabilities on news, weath- 
er, and sports strips in 10-11 markets; (2) Parker Pen (Tathum-Laird) is supplementing 
its Breakfast Club buy with tv spots in key markets, starting in March. 

National spot radio got a nice order from Mum (DCS&S) this week — 21 weeks 
in about 40 markets, starting 2 March. 

Aqua-Ivy (Anderson & Cairns) was scouting around in 38 scattered markets 

for minutes, which would start 16 March and run 6-8 weeks. The product is a poison oak and 
ivy deterrent. 

In Chicago, Florist Telegraph is lining up spots on about 230 stations for a Val- 
entine Day push via Keyes, Madden & Jones. 

A group of high-powered radio stations met in Chicago this week to discuss the 
feasibility of setting up their own centralized programing service. 

The talks are a continuation of feelers started by some broadcasters in New York 
several weeks ago. 

NBC TV has taken a leaf out of the across-the-schedule plan in spot selling. 
The network has begun to sell the Garroway and Jack Paar shows plus NBC News 

as a package on the thesis that the audience duplication is only about 3%. 
(A study is in the works further defining this duplication.) 

It may be due to the paucity of available and acceptable new product, but within re- 
cent weeks at least four properties have had a rebirth of sponsorship on the tv net- 
works: Buckskin, Meet McGraw, Richard Diamond, and Tombstone. 

Agency show buyers think this indicates that sponsors will resort more than ever to 
tested film shows as replacements this summer. 

A recent SPONSOR-SCOPE item on how one agency (heavy in groceries) ranked 
the first 25 markets may have caused some readers to equate this list erroneously with 
general market evaluation. 

It's not unusual for a market to have one rank in total retail sales and quite a different 
rank for a specific product. The two often aren't the same. 

Like may other businesses, modern marketing methods and consumer habits have 
put a big crimp in the tobacco industry's pride of status. 

Down-South tobacco oldtimers may lament it, but cigarette marketing today has much 
in common with the merchandising of drugs and toiletries. 

Gone is the symbol of fine leaf tobacco because: (1) the blending of cigarettes has 
changed considerably, and (2) the quality in the tobacco can't count so much when the 
smoke is filtered through a chemical. 

With the chances of loyalty to a brand ever decreasing as a result of the rise of the men- 
thol and filter tip, the cigarette manufacturer's main avenue to leadership is (1) progres- 
sive management, (2) quick transition to the new with a quality product, and (3) ad- 
vertising spark and plenty of it. 

18 SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

Both CBS TV and NBC TV have stepped up their efforts to wean away the accounts 
whose initial 26-week run on ABC TVs Operation Daybreak Flan expiree in April. 
The targets include Bristol-Myers, Lever, Nestle, Johnson & Johnson. 



Note that knowledgeable Madison Avenue showmen figure will be the next trend 
in elicksome network tv fare: mysteries with a strong aeeent on action. 

They contend that it's the only type that can stand up against the westerns. 

Incidentally, P&G has taken an option on one of these starring Robert Taylor. 



Oldsmobile is reversing an air media tradition: Instead of integrating the show's 
stars into the commercial, it's integrating the commercial's stars into the show. 

Olds' commercial personalities, Florence Henderson and Bill Hayes, for the past two 
seasons will have a musical show starring them on NBC TV (Thursday 8:30-9 p.m.). This 
series replaces the current Patti Page show. 

Noted a Madison Avenue wag: Why couldn't Piel's convert Bert and Harry into a 
cartoon series? 



Business in tv network specials sparked again this week: 

• Ford's Mercury-Lincoln-Edsel division paired up with Timex to sponsor the Phil 
Harris show on NBC 6 February. Total cost: $250,000 for show; $130,000 for time. 

• Timex bought half of the nighttime edition of the two 29 March Mary Martin specials. 
Total cost: $402,000, show; $167,000, time. 

• Minnesota Mining (BBDOl will do another special on ABC in April. 

• Liggett & Myers will bring back Frank Sinatra to ABC six or seven times. 



If you're interested in reaching women only, you may be able to make a sav- 
ing of about 20% by using daytime tv exclusively. 

Witness this comparative cost of commercial-minute-per-woman-viewer as based on 
the September-October 1958 Nielsen cost-per-thousand report and the October 1958 ARB 
audience composition: 

TIME CLASSIFICATION COST OF COM.-MIN.-PER-WOMAN-VIEWER 

Daytime $2.82 

Nighttime 3.56 

Source of calculation: NBC TV Research Department. 

Note: Average viewers per set in daytime are 1.6; nighttime, 2.5. 



Judging from the score for the week of 5-1 1 January, the tv networks as a whole will have 
less nighttime sponsored this January than the year before. 

However, the billings will be larger because of increased rates and lineups. The distribu- 
tion of sponsored time for that 5-11 January week was: 

1958 
17 his.; 15 mins. 
24 hrs. ; 3 mins. 
22 hrs.; 57 mins. 
64 hrs.; 15 mins. 

1958 
19 hrs.; 45 mins. 
25 hrs.; 15 mins. 
19 hrs.; 38 mins. 
64 hrs. ; 38 mins. 



NIGHTTIME NETWORK 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 
TOTAL 

DAYTIME NETW015K 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 
TOTAL 



1957 
18 hrs.; 40 mins. 

25 hrs. : 45 mins. 
24 hrs.; 38 mins. 
67 hrs.; 3 mins. 

1957 
4 his.; 57 mins. 

26 hrs. ; 36 mins. 
18 hrs.; 57 mins. 
49 hrs.; 34 mins. 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



19 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

In Irving lo sell a cigar company prospect on a quarter-hour of NBC News this 
week, the network indulged in one of those print vs. tv cost studies that shed some inter- 
esting light on the fineness of media rivalry. 

The prospect had been using an inside four-color page in Time, costing $19,940. 
NBC matched that with a news period on 119 stations, $26,970 and came out with this 
comparison: 

1) The magazine delivered 2,825,000 men*, whereas the average NBC News delivers 
3.840,000 men"". 

2) The magazine's cost-per-l,000-men-exposed to the ad was $7.06, while the cost-per- 
1,000-men-viewers came to $7.02. 

*Men who said they remembered the ad as reported by Starch; **based on Nielsen plus 
audience composition. 

Your Hit Parade, last of its kind, makes its final exit the end of March. 

The report persists that the sponsoring brand — Hit Parade — also is headed for 
limbo. 

CBS TV's plan is to move Rawhide up to Hit Parade's Friday (7:30 p.m.) time, 

which would give the hour western a starting edge against Ellery Queen and Disney Presents. 
Rawhide, by the way, is at the moment fully sponsored. 

Donahue & Coe again is on the prowl seeking to tie up the chainbreak in the 
Academy Awards telecast (NBC TV) set for 6 April. 

The agency is acting for the Motion Picture Association of America, which w r ould 
like to see the break devoted — with payment, of course — to an institutional plug for thea- 
tre attendance instead of products under contract by NBC affiliated stations. 

Clearing the decks for this film-industry-sponsored event involves over 200 tv stations 
in the U.S. and Canada. 

Notable among buyers of network radio this week were Midas Mufflers, Mail 
Pouch Tobacco, Clairol and Lehn & Fink. 

Midas will underwrite a quarter of the NBC News on the Hour for about 16 weeks, while 
Mail Pouch will use both CBS and NBC on a saturation basis to exploit its annual racing 
horse giveaway. 

For Clairol it's a weekly 15-minutes of Galen Drake for 30 weeks and for Lehn & Fink 8 
serial units and 6 impacts over eight weeks. Both are on CBS. 

Employee-owned Needham, Louis & Brorby reported this week record billings 
for 1958 of $37,814,761—15% over the 1957 total. 

The net profit after taxes came to $203,403, or a half cent on each billings dollar. 
NL&B's air media billings are well over 50% of the total billings. 

The plea among sponsors to their agencies of "Let's try to get away from west- 
erns" is beginning to bear fruit: Not one of the five shows bought by advertisers 
this week is a western or in any way related to a western. 

The new shows and their buyers were: Jackie Cooper's Hennessey (Lever) ; Trouble 
Shooters (Marlboro) ; Captain of Detectives, with Robert Taylor in seven episodes (P&G) ; 
Dennis the Menace (Kellogg) and the new Dick Clark show (Lorillard). 

Types: Trouble Shooters is straight adventure, Hennessey and Dennis are situation come- 
dies and the categories of the Clark and Taylor shows are obvious. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 24; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 53; sponsor 
Hears, page 56; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 66; and Film-Scope, page 54. 

20 sponsor • 31 JANUARY 1959 




as Colorado Celebrates Its Centennial 

STARR YELLAND — Highest rated sports show Avg. 20.9 

CARL AKERS — Highest rated evening news Avg. 23.9 

Highest rated afternoon news Avg. 11.4 

BOB BUTZ — Highest rated morning news Avg. 4.7 

ART GOW — Highest rated live music show Avg. 4.7 

GENE AMOLE — Highest rated live remote show 19.9 

FRED 'N FAE — Highest rated morning kid show 5.1 

DICK BECKER — Highest rated weather show Avg. 22.4 

WHIRLYBIRDS — Highest rated syndicated show 37.7 

Again first from sign on to sign off, seven days a 
week, in both the one week and four week period. 
3 of top 5 network programs on CBS-Television. 
*November ARB 





TELEVISION 

CBS IN DENVER 

channel 



Represented by KATZ Agency 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



21 



WHAT'S UP FRONT COUNTS 
and Goldie's GOT IT THERE! 

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IWl" 



Cuban tv 

My company Promotora Panameri- 
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vision and radio program producing 
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Dr. Luis Hernandez de Hita 

president 

Promotora Panamericana 

Havana, Cuba 

Mid-season round-up 
Years ago, the type of analysis which 
has been compiled in the article "Tv 
still goes thataway." 10 January, page 
31, had to be pulled together by the 
media analysis departments of the 
large agencies that could afford them. 
It certainlv was a joy to see that this 
wrap-up of the first 13 weeks of net- 
work television for the 1958-59 sea- 
son is already compiled for us in 
such a manner that even a beginner 
in this field could understand it. We 
would like to encourage Sponsor to 
continue to print analyses of this sort 
in the future since they are both edu- 
cational and informative. 

David H. Haughey 

asst. media dir., broadcast 

D'Arcy Advtg., Chicago 

Commercial Commentary 
The regrettable column bv John E. 
McMillin in the 17 Jan. 1959 issue 
of "sponsor" leaves out one basic 



fact, "ANACIN does relieve a head- 
ache." 

Benson C. Brainard, pres. 

Lavoptik Co., Inc. 

St. Paul 

Honestly, I can't turn another page 
of your magazine with any interest 
until I've gotten a note off to you in 
behalf of Mr. Bonham of Anacin. 
And I don't mean in his defense. 

My comment is just this, that many 
manufacturers besides the makers of 
Anacin have caused advertising to 
bear the mark of whoredom. 

I thank sponsor for your writings. 
Harold R. Gingrich 
Radio/Tv Advtg. 
Oak Park, III. 
P.S. 

Some thoughts on another area, of 
the use of advertising in questionable 
ways, are in December Harper's, in 
the article "Mutiny of the Bountiful." 
For between the makers of nostrums 
and the beggars of money for disease 
"relief" advertising is getting to be 
a serious distraction. 

I've got to write you an enthusiastic 
fan letter on your commercial com- 
mentaries in sponsor in general, and 
in particular your most recent one 
entitled "Build Thee More Stately 
Mansions." You've got the guts to ; 
say the things that many of us want 
to say and the ability to say them 
well. My congratulations. 

James L. Saphier 

James L. Saphier Agency 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Radio walloping again 

We at WNGO thought that your ar- 
ticle "Radio Wallops Newspapers in 
New Grocery Shopping Study" was 
one of the best you've had. We have 
some very "hard to convince" super- 
markets we would like to show it to. 
Charles W. Stratton 
gen. mgr., WNGO 
Mayfield, Kentucky 



sponsor 



31 JANUARY 1959 



Biggest breakfast 




ABC Radio signs 11 advertisers for Don McNeill's "Breakfast Club"! 
Network's total sales since November: more than $5,000,000! 

ABC proudly points to the great new sponsors* of Don McNeill's "Break- 
fast Club." With the addition of these sponsors, we have completed one 
of the most sweeping sales of radio time in our history. • Advertisers' 
appetite for ABC Radio is sharpened daily. More than 36 new adver- 
tisers have been signed by the network in the past two months alone! 
• Good reason: Our bill of fare is both popular and very sensibly priced. 
Let us take your order! 

* Bel tone Hearing Aid Company • Ex-Lax, Inc. ■ Food Products Manufacturer (to be announced Feb. 6) ■ General 
Foods Corp. (Perkins Division) • Gulf Guaranty Land & Title Co. • Landers, Frary & Clark • Magla Products 
Parker Pen Company • Rock of Ages Corp. • Russell Spruance Company • Standard Brands, Inc. 

ABC RADIO NETWORK 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



23 



Problem Solved by 
an Ad Manager 




Tom figured he'd never make 
any real dough. 




Everybody complained 90 
much about ad costs he dared 
not ask for a raise. 



1 



Blair TV Associates said he 
could get real mileage in un- 
duplicated markets such as 
WCTV. 




He tried it. Sales up, costs 
down, everybody happy. 




He got the raise, and winters 
in Miami like everybody else! 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 






for North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Planters Nut & Chocolate Co., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., is kicking off a 
campaign in 17 markets for its peanut butter. The schedules start in 
February for eight weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks during daytime 
slots are being used, with frequencies varying. The buyer is Ed 
Karns; the agency is the Don Kemper Co., New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York is preparing schedules in 50 
markets for its Super Suds detergent. The campaign begins the sec- 
ond week in February for 14 weeks. Minutes, I.D.'s and 20s are 
being placed; frequency varies from market to market. The buyer 
is Steve Semons; the agency is Cunningham & Walsh, Inc., New York. 

Family Products Division, Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co., 
Inc., Morris Plains, N. J., is entering 52 markets with a campaign for 
its Quick Home Permanent. The 19-week schedule starts in Februai \ . 
Minutes during both daytime and nighttime segments are being used. 
Frequencies depend upon the market. The buyer is Frank Sweeney; 
the agency is Lambert & Feasley, Inc., New York. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., Louisville, Ky., is going into 
major markets for its Kool cigarettes. The schedules start in Febru- 
ary on a 52-week basis; the advertiser usually cuts back. Minutes 
during nighttime periods are being lined up; frequencies vary from 
market to market. The buyer is Jack Sinnott; the agency is Ted 
Bates & Co., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich., is going into markets throughout 
the country to push its Edsel car. The four-week campaign starts in 
February. Minutes during daytime slots are being scheduled; fre- 
quencies vary from market to market. The buyers are Lou Kennedy 
and Ralph Bodle; the agency is Kenyon & Eckhardt. Inc., New York. 

Q-Tips Sales Corp., Long Island City, N. Y., is lining up schedules 
in top markets for its Q-Tips cotton swabs. The campaign starts 16 
February for 13 weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks during daytime 
slots are being purchased. Frequencies depend upon the market. 
The buyer is Anita Wasserman; the agency is the Lawrence C. 
Gumbinner Adv. Agency, Inc., New York. 

Boyle-Midway, div. of American Home Products Corp., New York, 
is planning a campaign in scattered markets for its Griffin shoe polish. 
The schedules kick off 15 February for 12 weeks. Chainbreaks, 20's 
and 30's during daytime periods are being placed. Frequencies vary 
from market to market. The buyer is Ed Richardson; the agency is 
Geyer, Morey, Madden & Ballard, Inc., New York. 



24 



SPONSOR 



24 JANUARY 1959 




it's a habit... 




— U ll> 





f KMJ-TV . . . 


JpV vSfV 


first TV station in 




The Billion-Dollar , 




Valley of the Bees 


1LJ 




^@l 






3j THE 


SPONSOR 


• 31 JANUARY 1959 



FIRST TV STATION IN FRESNO 

For example: 

» More Quarter-Hour Wins Monday 
thru Saturday 

27% more than Station A 
82% more than Station B 



in FRESNO 

(California) 



First in Share of Audience Sign- 
on to Sign-off 

first in weekday mornings 
first in weekday afternoons 
first 7 nights per week 

Nine Out of Top Twenty Shows 
50% more than Station A 
80% more than Station B 



KATZ 



(Oct-Nov 1958 4-week ARB Fresno Metropolitan Area) 

AGENCY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



25 




TWO FUN SHOWS FOR 



ATTRACTING A FAMILY AUDIENCE 

Here's a BEST BUY for spot buyers looking for good family coverage 
in the big, rich Western New York Market. 57 minutes of comedy pro- 
gramming that attracts young and old, on the only TV station in the 
area that delivers a 17 county-plus audience in Western New York and 
Northeastern Pennsylvania — and a bonus audience in the Canadian- 
Niagara Peninsula. These LIFE OF RILEY and BURNS AND ALLEN 
re-runs provide the perfect background for profitable promotion. 

If your product is for Mom, Dad, Sister and Brother . . . and Aunt 
and Uncle, too, then check today with Harrington, Righter and Parsons, 
our national representatives. They'll arrange a spot for you on Dinner 
Date Theatre. 

YOUR TV DOLLARS COUNT FOR MORE ON CH 



WBEIM-TVc 



CBS in Buffalo 

THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS STATION 




26 



SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 








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THE F&M.SCHAEFER BPiWERY] 

1642 I I 







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PART ONE OF A TWO-PART STORY 



Courtesj of American Brewei 



BEER: Big business in ferment 



^ Mergers and population factors temporarily have 
this $75 million-a-year air media spender on edge 

^ But more internal stability and growth in the right 
age brackets will step up sales — and advertising 



J\n orderly but potent revolution is 
taking place in the brewing industry 
I which invests about $75 million a 
year in the air media ) . Its effect has 
already been felt in that sector; it 
will be felt much more in the next 
five years. 

Here's the basic framework to bear 
in mind : 



• The early 1960's should see the 
consumption of beer (which has been 
in a steady decline per capita-wise 
since 1950) pick up again as the 
bumper crop of World War II babies 
reaches majority and swells the ranks 
of the beer-drinking age group — 21 
to 59. 

• Some analysts of the brewing in- 



dustry foresee, by 1964, a total U.S. 
beer production of 94 million bar- 
rels (there are 31 gallons of beer to 
a barrel) , or more than 4 million bar- 
rels more than are being made now. 

• Only thing, if the revolution con- 
tinues, is that this flood of suds will 
be produced by a relative handful of 
brewing companies. Most of these 
will have at least two brands — one 
premium-priced, one popular-priced. 

Implications for the broadcast in- 
dustry are: (1) Dwindling of ad 
revenue from smaller local breweries 
as close shop: and l2i excellent 
chance of more national spot and even 
network investments 1>\ the surviving 
colossi among shipping brewers. 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



27 



"Brewing has stumbled into a war 
of attrition," says the beverage ana- 
lyst for a Wall Street investment firm. 
The brewers themselves would be the 
last to refute this. 

SPONSOR believes that agencies, 
sponsors, and broadcasters might well 
take a look at the battleground: this 
two-part story is that look. This 
week's installment deals with the 
breuing industry itself — its market- 
ing problems and potentials. Next 
week's will project the events into 
effects on the air media. 

Some of the latest and most sig- 
nificant developments in the beer 
marketing revolution can be noted in 
these samples: 

Carling Brewing fa subsidiary of 
Canadian Breweries) has just ac- 



quired Heidelberg Brewing of Ta- 
coma, Wash.; in August, Pabst 
bought Blatz in Milwaukee, adding 
two more brands to the Pabst line — 
Blatz and Tempo beers; Anheuser- 
Busch is opening a new branch brew- 
ery in Tampa, and last February took 
over another Florida brewery ■ — 
American Brewing in Miami. 

Such concentrations are the har- 
bingers of what lies ahead for brew- 
ing. Last year, 44 brewing companies 
disappeared from the U.S. scene. To- 
day, there are 234 breweries — count- 
ing branch breweries of the big re- 
gional and national producers — in 
operation. This is about a hundred 
less than the figure for the first year 
of Bepeal. In 1934, the year after 
Repeal, the number of breweries had 



jumped to 756, but that was the top 
of the graph. It's been going down- 
hill ever since; slightly more than 
400 survived by 1950; five years 
later they had shrunk to just under 
300. Brewers' mortality since 1934 
has been more than two-thirds. 

While the number of breweries has 
been dwindling, total production has 
been increasing. Those 756 breweries 
of 1934 produced 37.7 million bar- 
rels (average per brewery: not quite 
50,000 barrels), while 20 years later 
about 300 breweries spilled out over 
85 million barrels (average per brew- 
ery: almost 300,000 barrels). The 
reason for the jump in production 
obviously was an increasing popula- 
tion — and apparently a thirstier one. 

In 1950, however, something hap- 



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QUICK PANORAMA OF THE NATION'S lO BIGGES* 



Rank 
1957 


Brewery & 
Home Plant 


Branch Breweries 
By State 


Brands 


Distribution 
By Regions 


1 


Anheuser-Busch 

(St. Louis) 


Mo., Fla., N.J., 
Calif. 


Budweiser, Busch 
Bavarian, Michelob 


National 


2 


Schlitz 

(Milwaukee) 


N.Y., Calif., Mo., 
Wis., Fla. 


Schlitz 

Old Milwaukee 


National 


3 


Falstaff 

(St. Louis) 


Mo., La., Neb., 
Calif., Ind., Tex. 


Falstaff 


Calif., Midwest, 
S.E. & S.W. states 


4 


Ballantine 

(Newark) 


None 


Ballantine ale & beer 


National 


5 


Hamm 

(St. Paul) 


Calif., Minn. 


Hamm's Preferred 


National 


6 


Carling 

(Cleveland) 


Ohio, III., Ca., 
Mass., Mich. 


Red Cap Ale 
Black Label 
Stag 


National 


7 


Liebmann 

( Brooklyn) 


NJ. 


Rheingold Extra Dry 
Rheingold Ale 
McSorley's Ale 


Metropolitan N. ^ 


8 


Schaefer 

(New York City) 


N.Y. (Albany) 


Schaefer 


New England state 
Mid-Atlantic state 
Fla., & Va. 


9 


Pabst 

(L.A. & Chicago) 


Wis., N.J. 


Pabst Blue Ribbon 
Eastside Old Tap Lager 
Blatz & Tempo 


National 


10 


Stroh 

(Detroit) 


None 


Stroh's Bohemian 


Midwest and 
N.W. states 



SOURCES: Research Corporation of America, U. S. Brewers Foundation, SRDS, American Brewer Magazine 

^T _■ ;!!■ ; : |r . i: ; . :;i: ;i: : ,:|: !,: ■ !, M- i IMUMIil illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll , J llli ', !!i-' ii> IMIM: Jill II ',ii r !i,: ^ ., li ,- ii M' ; I, Illlilllllllllllilllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIIID 

28 SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 






pened both to the U.S. population and 
its thirst for beer. From 1934 to that 
year, per capita annual consumption 
of beers and ales had climbed from 
7.9 gallons to 17.2. Since then it has 
drifted steadily downward to about 
15 gallons per capita. Today, it is vir- 
tually a static market. Although popu- 
lation has increased appreciably since 
1950, it has done so at the extreme 
ends of the life span — in the CO-plus 
age group ( because of longevity) and 
in the under-21 class (through 
births). The beer-consuming bracket 
(21 to 59) picked up only a 15% 
gain between 1940 and 1955. So the 
brewers are now pointing to the 
1960s when this highly-regarded age 
segment should show a sharp increase. 
Yet within the brackets of eligible 



imbibers, something apparently hap- 
pened to the beer thirst also. In the 10 
years from 1947 to 1957, per capita 
beer consumption went down about 
18%, distilled spirits lost only 2' > . 
while wines and soft drinks gained 
33% and 25 % respectively. Brewers, 
however, can take comfort from the 
fact that they still lead the rest in per 
capita consumption I wines can claim 
only about 9/10 of a gallon; spirits 
about iy± gallons; and soft drinks 
about 11% gallons) and that many 
of the teen-agers drinking soft drinks 
today will be beer customers tomor- 
row. The highest peak in per capita 
beer consumption in the U.S. came 
in the years just prior to World War 
I when the gallonage was at 21 a 
{Please turn to page 65) 




Steel and Glass — not wooden barrels 
are today's hallmarks. These fermenting 
tanks are at Jacob Kuppert Brewery 



«l«llll!l!llll!ll!lllllllllllll!llllll!l!l!lllll!!i|llllli!!l!l!lillillll!lllll!n 

SltREWERS AND THE VAST EMPIRES THEY CONTROL 






1957 



6,116 



6.024 



4,292 



3,982 



3,376 



3,151 



2.966 



*i 2,940 



2.700 



2,584 



SALES 
(by thousand barrels* 

1955 



5.617 



5.780 



5.653 



3,953 



3.072 



2.655 



3.162 



2.600 



3.275 



2.153 



1950 



Agency 



Client 
Ad Manager 



Client 
Mktg. Dir. 



4,889 



5,097 



2.287 



4.375 



1.053 



502 



2.662 



2.652 



3,149 



514 



D'Arcy, Gardner 

(St. Louis) 



JWT 

(Ch 



icago) 



Grant 

(Chicigo) 



D-F-S 

(NYC) 



Wm. Esty 

(NYC) 



Campbell-Mirhun 

( Milwaukee) 



Various" 



FC&B 

(NYC) 



BBDO 

(NYC) 



K&E 

(NYC) 



Y&R 

(LA.) 



Zimmcr, Keller, & 
Calvert, Inc. 

(Detroit) 



Walter T. Smith. Jr. 



Jos. M. McMahon. Jr. 
F. L. Smawley 



Alvin Griesedieck, Jr. 



Leonard Faupel 



John R. Moran 



R. C. Garretson 



Wm. L. Dye 



John Nemesh 



Theodore Rosenak 



William Bien 



R. A. Uihlein, Jr. 

(v. p. dir. sis.) 



Karl K. Vollmer 



W. H. Alley 

(gen. sis. mgr.) 



Henrv Turnbull 



D. J. Dittmann 

(sl_. pr. mgr.) 



John E. Finneran 

(v. p. chg. sis.) 



John T. Morris 



Rocco B. Bunino 

(v. p. chg. sis.) 



Harold S. \\ agoner 

(v.p. chg. sls.> 



Mtlors B&B (NYC); Lang, Fisher & Stashover (Cleveland); Edward H. Weiss Co. (Chicago); Winius-Brando Co (SI Louis); Harold 
bot Co. (Boston); Liller, Neal & Battle (Atlanta); Aitken-Kynett (Philadelphia) 

■ mhii iiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiilllim ..,,i; n; , ■ ,.,im - ■ : ..in: . ;.,i- ,m- ,i,i: ::■ ,r ,n;- ■ ■ ,iii" :,- i:,, 

SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



29 



PART TWO OF A SPONSOR SERIES 



SPONSOR'S 

$500 MILLION 

PLAN FOR 

SPOT RADIO 



Why Spot Radio must 
get more competitive 

^ If the industry is to reach $500 million goal 
by 1963 it must throw out old business concepts 

^ In planning new basic strategy the first need is 
to face "facts of life" about spot radio's competition 



Last week in introducing its 
$500 million plan for national 
spot radio, sponsor proposed a 
radio sales goal of at least 9% of 
appropriations spent by national 
advertisers by 1963. 

Such a goal would, in spon- 
sor's opinion, mean at least $550 
million in billings for national 
spot radio alone, almost three 
times the present rate, sponsor 
believes this entirely possible 



providing the industry can revise 
and re-plan its activities along 
sounder, more business-like lines. 
Before turning to details of 
such replanning, however, spot 
radio needs to draw up a new 
"battle plan" — a new, long-range 
over-all concept of basic business 
strategy to replace the haphazard 
short-range and short-sighted 
business tactics now followed in 
many parts of the industry. 



^illlllllilllllillllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll! IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUM Illlllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllll 



SPONSOR'S $500 MILLION PLAN 

sponsor is presenting its new 5-year, $500 million plan 
for national spot radio in five weekly installments: 

Step one: Sales Goals for spot radio. Why SPONSOR believes 
it can reach $500 million by 1963. (24 January) 

Step two Basic strategy for spot radio. Why SPONSOR believes 

it must be strongly competitive against "Big Three" 
(discussed in this issue) 

Step three: Putting Spot Radio's house in order. Mistakes, errors, 
and outworn methods which must be quickly corrected. 
(7 February) 

Step four: Building spot radio's strength. How the medium can 
add to its present stature, resources and importance. 
( 14 February) 

Step five: Selling spot radio's image and power. A discussion of 
new types of spot radio sales approaches. (21 February) 

In addition to these articles already planned, SPONSOR will schedule 
additional features bearing on spot radio's future, as they develop 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 



#%ny realistic plan for increasing 
radio spot's share of national adver- 
tising must start with an obvious fact 
of simple arithmetic: 

The only way in which spot can get 
more is for some other medium or 
media to get less. 

That is the only way it can be done. 

National radio spot can never build 
up its share of national advertising 
volume by continuing its present 
practices of bitter inside-the-industry 
fights. It cannot do it by warfare 
among stations, groups and station 
representatives. 

It can only achieve what SPONSOR 
believes is its rightful estate if it turns 
and boldly faces up to its outside 
competition. It must re-plan and re- 
organize as an industry to take busi- 
ness from other media. 

Here are the major media which 
are competing with radio spot for the 
national advertiser's dollars, together 
with estimates (from McCann Erick- 
son-Printers' Ink) of how much na- 
tional advertising each received in 
1958. 

Magazines $765 million 

Newspapers — 740 

Net tv 726 " 

Spot tv ______ 369 " 

Outdoor .. 138 

Net radio 65 

By comparison, national radio spot 
received an estimate $190 million in 
1958 (sponsor estimate). 

Obviously if radio spot is going to 
reach a goal of anything like $500 
million by 1963, it will have to roll 
up its sleeves and wade in against 
some very tough competition. 

That's the first fact of its economic 
life. 



30 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



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SPOT RADIO'S 3 TOUGHEST COMPETITORS 




1. NEWSPAPERS. The biggest 
advertising medium in the U.S. Bigger 
than tv and magazines combined. To- 
tal national and local revenues over 
$3 billion. Now organizing for an in- 
dustry-wide "Total Selling" program. 
If spot radio is to build as a medium, 
it must find new ways to take business 
from newspapers. Newspapers repre- 
sent both spot radio's biggest com- 
petitor, and its biggest opportunity. 




2. SPOT TV. Probably the fast- 
est growing medium in the entire ad- 
vertising picture. Will bill well over 
$400 million in 1959. Increasingly 
popular with agencies and large na- 
tional advertisers for "market-by-mar- 
ket" campaigns. To sell against spot 
tv, spot radio must develop new ideas, 
plans, and packages which have a 
greater appeal to the national adver- 
tiser than what he is now offered. 




3. OUTDOOR. Did a healthy 
$138 million in national advertising 
in 1958. Twice as big as net radio 
for instance, and twice as popular 
with national advertisers. Often un- 
noticed by air media men, it has many 
prime national accounts against which 
spot radio must learn how to sell 
Radio can offer more proven sales suc- 
cesses than outdoor but lacks the 
ability to dramatize these successes. 



iiim iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 



The second is simply this: spot 
radio must pick out its real or "nat- 
ural" competitors and concentrate on 
them . 

Of the six other major media in 
which national advertisers place their 
appropriations, there are three which 
are natural and obvious competitors 
for radio spot: newspapers, spot tv, 
and outdoor. These are spot radio's 
real opponents. 

The remaining three — magazines, 
net tv, and net radio — are not, in 
sponsor's opinion, spot radio's real 
competition for a variety of reasons. 

Magazines are used by national ad- 
vertisers for entirely different pur- 
poses and objectives than are the 
localized, market - by - market cam- 
paigns in which spot radio figures. 

Net tv also represents a different 
kind of national expenditure, one in 
which huge appropriations are used 
to blanket the total national market. 
Neither net tv nor magazines oper- 
ate in the same way as radio spot. 
They are not its real "enemies" nor 



has radio spot any effective weapons 
with which to fight them. 

As for network radio, many station 
owners and station representatives 
who have resented the sales tactics of 
the networks will be surprised to 
learn that sponsor does not consider 
it one of spot radio's "natural com- 
petitors. 

Here is why : In the first place net 
radio is much the smallest of the 
national media, and even if spot ra- 
dio got every dime of advertising 
now being placed in network, it 
would fall far short of its $500 mil- 
lion goal. 

In the second place, a continuation 
of the present bitter warfare between 
network and spot will only mean (as 
it has in the past) a downgrading of 
the reputation and good name of ra- 
dio itself. And such downgrading 
hurts spot even more than it hurts 
network radio. 

In the third place, if spot radio 
takes time out to fight net radio, it is 
inevitably neglecting far bigger, and 



much more dangerous competition. 

Newspapers are by far the largest 
advertising medium in the U. S. and 
in 1958 accounted for more than $3 
billion in national and local advertis- 
ing revenues. 

In sponsor's opinion, newspapers 
must be considered spot radio's No. 1 
target during the next five years. 

The nature and structure of spot 
radio I discussed at length in future 
sponsor articles) make it exception- 
ally well equipped to compete with 
newspapers for national advertising 
revenues, providing the industry can 
find the courage and leadership to 
put its own house in order. 

But let no one underestimate the 
power or plans of the newspapers 
themselves. At recent meetings in 
Chicago, the ANPA I American News- 
paper Publishers' Association) an- 
nounced a new "Total Selling" pro- 
gram, a vigorous, carefully organized 
plan designed to win for newspapers 
a greater share of national advertis- 
ing dollars. 



SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



31 



SPOT RADIO AND ITS COMPETITION 

1958 EXPENDITURES BY NATIONAL ADVERTISERS 

(MILLIONS OF DOLLARS) 



$765 



$740 



S726 



$369 



$190 



I 



$138 



$65 

n 



Magazines Newspapers Net TV Spot TV Spot Radio Outdoor Net TV 

Source: McCann-Btickson-Printers' Ink estimates, based on 6 month data for all media except radio 
spot. Radio spot figure of $1!)0 million is a SPONSOR estimate, based on industry information. 



Claiming the support of 1,750 daily 
publications, the "Total Selling" pro- 
gram will stage four major promo- 
tions during 1959, aimed at national 
advertisers in the automobile, food, 
appliance, and health and beauty aid 
industries. 

Spot radio must find the ideas and 
methods to combat such competition. 
For its very life depends, in large 
measure, on how well it can do against 
newspapers between 1959 and 1963. 

Spot tv is spot radio's No. 2 op- 
ponent, and gaining power very fast. 
sponsor expects spot tv to do well 
over $410 million in 1959, due to 
mounting enthusiasm for the medium 
among agencies and national adver- 
tisers. 

Yet there are undoubtedly many 
accounts which might use spot radio 
schedules even more profitably than 
they are using spot tv. 

Spot radio's real problem in com- 
bating spot tv is to come up with sell- 
ing ideas, plans and packages that 
make more sense to the national ad- 
vertisers, than what he has seen so far. 

Outdoor is the third of spot radio's 
major opponents, and surprisingly 
healthy, in view of the fact that out- 
door, as an industry, cannot point to 
the same proven sales successes as 
most other media. 



32 



In outdoor's total $138 million, 
there are many prime national ac- 
counts which spot radio must solicit 
aggressively during the next five 
years. And as with newspapers and 
spot tv, it must develop new sales 
plans to capture outdoor business. 

These then are the "Big Three" of 
spot radio's competition. And SPON- 
SOR believes that it will help spot ra- 
dio men to face this fact vigorously 
and honestly. 

If spot radio is going to be suc- 
cessful in raising its own percent 
share of national advertising, then it 
must whittle down the shares which 
these "Big Three" competitors are 
getting. 

sponsor believes that three things 
are necessary in order to do this. 
First, spot radio must put its own 
house in order; it must clean up some 
of the practices which are now re- 
tarding its healthy progress. Second, 
spot radio must make itself even 
stronger as an advertising medium, 
by developing and enlarging its own 
resources. And third, it must develop 
a new kind of selling to present the 
industry's image and power in a new. 
more favorable light. 

Next week, sponsor discusses the 
steps to be taken in spot radio's 
"house-cleaning." ^ 



AGENCY 



W D. P. Brother media- 
buyers add helpful dimension 
by hearing station program 
tapes throughout work day 



\Jsmosis is becoming a significant 
factor in timebuying tactics as agency 
buyers struggle more desperately to 
sort conflicting claims and to juggle 
rating and audience figures. One of 
the newer variations in this osmosis 
process has been developed in De- 
troit, where D. P. Brother & Co. ex- 
poses its entire buying staff to back- 
ground "radio" throughout the day. 

The background is tape recordings 
furnished by radio stations in major 
markets from all over the country 
who supply two or three hours of 
their programing to the agency. 
Brother services such national ac- 
counts as Oldsmobile and AC Spark- 
plug, divisions of General Motors. 

From start to finish of the work 
day, except for lunch hours and con- 
ference sessions, Brother buyers are 
"tuned in" — both consciously and 
subconsciously — to tapes furnished 
by these stations. The agency objec- 
tive: to supplement the factual infor- 
mation on ratings, adjacencies and 
availabilities with the more intangible 
pros or cons of the specific radio 
operation. The buyers' tuning-in 
process gives them a two-hour aural 
pattern of the station personalitv, its 
performers, its program technique 
and handling of commercials and its 
"public face." Both buyers and 
clients are increasingly interested in 
this public picture as intra-station 
competition and claims increase. 

Conflicting claims by stations and 
the media salesmen representing them 
was the major factor in the agency 
decision to adopt this "hear-and- 
learn-as-you-work" principle. Jack 
Walsh, chief buyer, cites this case. 

Taking the San Francisco-Oakland 
market as an example, he said 12 of 
the 18 radio stations there cited their 
facilities as a "must buy" and gave 
sound documentation. 

Brother's answer to this problem: 
seeing that the buyer "is master of 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



BUYS RADIO BY OSMOSIS 



a lot more information than the rating 
books provide." 

Mr. Walsh sees these "seemingl) 
contradictory claims and counter- 
claims in every multiple-station mar- 
ket in the country." And Oldsmobile 
usually buys more than one station 
in a market. 

The qualitative factor in buying is 
of increasing concern to agencies and 
clients. Because many stations in 
purely quantitative terms appear to 
be equal in terms of delivery and 
cost, the buyer must go into this 
deeper dimension to seek such quality 
elements as a station's public service 
policies, the stability of its manage- 
ment, the quality and integrity of its 
news presentations, its over-all audi- 
ence attraction and its general pro- 
graming facade. 

Yet Brother executives realize lis- 
tening and analyzing taped radio 
programing is not as simple as it 
might appear. The thing they cau- 
tion buyers aaainst most strongly: 
the injection of personal opinion and 
taste into their deliberations. 

C. W. Wacker, v.p. and media di- 
rector for the agency, describes 
"operation tape recorder:" 

"In order to have a sound picture 
of all the radio stations in America's 
top markets, the tape recording ma- 
chine plays in all offices of the time- 
buying department. 

"This tape recorder is being used 
as much as possible so we can get 
definite impressions of stations' pro- 
graming, calibre of news and hand- 
ling of commercials. This informa- 
tion is then entered on data sheets. 

"Each station is given the oppor- 
tunity to have a couple of hours as 
an 'audition.' This gives us a third, 
and most important, dimension — the 
station's actual on-the-air programing 
along with costs and ratings. We ex- 
pect this to be a continuing project," 
says Mr. Wacker. 

The chief buyer. Jack Walsh, em- 
phasizes the importance of a clear 
understanding of each station's quali- 
tative strength as a major aid in ex- 
pediting the purchase of radio an- 
nouncements. And buyers work bet- 
ter as well as faster when buying in 
a sizable number of markets if data 



have been obtained well in advance. 

Once availabilities come pouring in 
and representative salesmen begin 
their pitches, there is no time to start 
collecting "beyond the rating" fac- 
tors, he says. At this point, speedy 
verdicts are called for. But with 
previously-learned qualitative factors 
in hand, Mr. Walsh finds the task of 
analyzing stations is much easier. 

What do stations think of this 
audition idea? 



Here's yvhal top management peo- 
ple from two 50 kyv stations in L.OS 
Angeles had to say. 

No. 1: "We believe that the quali- 
tative factors in radio buying today 
are as important as the quantitative 
factors." 

No. 2: "Frankly. I am very much 
impressed with your project because 
I think its the only way that you 
can actually get a true impression of 
the personalit) of the station. " ^ 



Agency monitoring is innovation at Detroit's D. P. Brother agency as Dick Hoffman. <b 
buyer on Oldsmobile and AC Sparkplug, and Jack Walsh, chief buyer, check station tape^ 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 





%% 



V 



„**• 



Hard-smoking accounts for peak Philip Morris Co. sales and busy schedule of Bob Larkin, chain store sales chief who heads extensive 



PM SMOKES UP A CHAIN STORE 



^ Philip Morris hits hard for food chains to retain 
control of inventory and in-store space allocation 



N 



ext to water and air, 
can be found most easily and in the 
greatest quantity in the most places. 
So says Robert Sutton Larkin, Philip 
Morris' director of chain store sales. 
His is a big job in a big industry. 
The cigarette industry, as he describes 
it, has the "most universally con- 



sumed product. It can be found in 
every corner and crevice of any 
country." The problem of getting and 
keeping this universal distribution 
and distribution in depth — so that 
smokers need only reach out a hand 
to find a pack of cigarettes — is Mr. 
Larkin's major preoccupation. 



Distribution is necessarily the fo- 
cal point in cigarette manufacture 
and in its advertising. To make pro- 
duction pay off and to get maximum 
impact and return from the ad cam- 
paign (the company, for all brands, 
spends an estimated $10 million a 
year on network and spot television, 
alone), manufacturers have to know 
the problems of the retailer. 

This is what Philip Morris and 
Bob Larkin have been doing with 
increasing intensity since the mer- 



34 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 





education program. Chains get 60% of sales 



STORM 



chandising revolutions which fol- 
lowed World War II. Cigarettes sold 
automatically during the war years, 
but the competitive race started up 
with renewed vigor in 1946 and 1947. 

Cigarettes, which had been a step- 
child in the considerations of most 
grocery store management people, 
gained respectability as managers be- 
gan to realize the profit potential in 
this (relatively) high mark-up item 
and in a fast-turnover line. 

PM needed a man with new revolu- 



tionary ideas of his own and some 
persuasive counter-revolutionary de- 
vices. That man was Bob Larkin. one 
of four top executives brought into 
the compam in 1947 to put some of 
their time-tested experience as well 
as their new ideas to work for PM 
in its own merchandising revolution. 
Even then the handwriting was visi- 
ble on most chain store walls. An 
increasing share of cigarette sales 
was being made in chain stores 
(drug as well as grocery). The bat- 
tle was raging for in-store display 
space, for ever better and bigger 
racks, for top position and heavy 
stocks. 

Bob Larkin knew the retailer's 
problems — and a lot of the answers. 
His father in Elgin, 111., had oper- 
ated a local grocery store where the 
son took his in-store training Larkin 
applied these behind-the-counter gro- 
cery techniques to marketing theory at 
Northwestern U. in Evanston. 111., 
where he took a Bachelor of Science 
degree and attended graduate school. 

Successive years with the Indepen- 
dent Grocers Alliance in the late 30's 
— at a time when the voluntary chain 
and the independents were growing 
in stature and in sales volume — led 
to New York marketing, merchandis- 
ing, sales and promotion work in the 
food product field with the Loose- 
Wiles Biscuit Co. (now Sunshine). 
The only missing element to Bob 
Larkin's jigsaw of the total food store 
operating picture came with account 
and merchandising assignments at 
Compton Advertising. From this 
agency he joined Philip Morris in 
1947 as director of sales promotion. 

Today, as director of chain store 
sales, he is responsible for the co- 
ordinated activity of all departments 
in stocking and servicing multiple- 
unit groups of stores. These chain 
stores, at the current time, represent 
about 60T of all PM business. 

For every 100 cartons of cigarettes 
sold, almost 40 are sold in grocery 
stores (25 in supermarkets, alone), 
16 in vending machines, 15 in drug 
stores. 12 in tobacco shops. 9 in res- 
aurants and five to the military, the 
rest in miscellaneous outlets. 

Bob Larkin has introduced many 
new ideas to the field of cigarette 
merchandising and marketing in line 
with his company's policy of working 
for the "long pull" in sales and dis- 
tribution. PM's theory: know the re- 



tailer's business better than he does 
(or at least as well) ; instruct him in 
cigarette merchandising because he 
can't be expected to know everything 
about 5.000 different items. 

The Larkin-PM program is a sim- 
ple one in concept, infinitely more 
complex in application. Its theme is 
"Think Retail." PM helps chain 
store retailers to operate their entire 
business — not just the cigarette por- 
tion of the business more efficiently, 
more professionally and more im- 
aginatively . 

"It's an educational program, pure 
(Please turn to page 45 i 




Marlboro Man Larkin posed for one of 
earliest Leo Burnett ads, supervises I'M 
planning of better in-store displays, rec- 
ommendations for improved management 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 




Parti-Day recap: sales up 245 



o 



^ After 13 weeks, tv test of new dessert toppings 
indicates sales may go even higher during next 13 

^ Study of brand awareness shows, after less than 
two months of advertising, that 60% know of product 



^%fter 13 weeks of advertising, an- 
swers are starting to roll in from the 
tv sales test of Parti-Day dessert top- 
pings in the Green Bay. Wis., area. 

Barring some unforeseen monkey 
wrench in the marketing machinery, 
those conducting the 26-week test, 
being reported exclusively in sponsor 
on a week-by-week basis, are already 
prepared to pronounce it a resound- 
ing sales success. 

• Sales are running at a rate 
245% higher than before the test 
started (see chart below) and the fig- 



ure is expected to go even higher. 
There was no doubt that tv could sell 
the product but the sales rate was a 
pleasant surprise. 

• Brand awareness is at a high 
level — more than 60% in point of 
fact — a gratifying figure uncovered 
in a survey made after less than two 
months of advertising. 

• The survey made strikingly clear 
that brand awareness is primarily due 
to tv. 

• The use of live minutes, Avith a 
local personality carrying the sales 



burden, has proved itself and will be 
used, modified by local conditions, in 
other markets. 

All the answers are by no means 
in. The client, Parti-Day, Inc., a 
subsidiary of Liquid Carbonic Corp., 
and its agency, D'Arcy's Chicago of- 
fice, are concerned with more than 
just sales figures. With 13 weeks yet 
to go, however, more data will be 
accumulated. 

For those who haven't been follow- 
ing the test, here's a recap. 

Parti-Day is a 49^ dessert topping 
put out in four flavors and packaged 
in an aerosol container. Dessert top- 
pings are not new but the aerosol 
container for toppings is and, aside 
from a minor brand, Parti-Day is the 
only topping in the Green Bay area 
so packaged. (Nestle recently jumped 
into Hartford with an aerosol-pack- 
aged dessert topping.) 



DESSERT TOPPING SHIPMENTS SHOW UNEVEN RISE 

NUMBER OF PARTI-DAY CASES SHIPPED IN GREEN BAY AREA 



City 



Manitowoc 

Oshkosh 

Appleton 

Gillett 

Green Bay 

Menominee 

Fond du Lac... 
Stevens Point. 

Wausau 

Norway 

Sheboygan 



TOTALS 



BEFORE TV 
STARTED 

(CASES) 

15-day Average 





12 

114 

16 

8 

5 



30 


27 
50 



262 



FIRST 13 WEEKS OF TV TEST (cases) 



580 1450 370 1090 350 1595 



AFTER TV 
STARTED 

(CASES) 




905.8 



Peaks and valleys in semi-monthly sales totals are due to over-careful buying by wholesalers who still aren't convinced 
of tvs sales power, according to food broker. Conservative buying is followed by larger orders as stocks hit a low point 

ie" - ;i.! :' ih ,IM ,:!:! : , : |l; ,,l: :!: : .il' .,11. .,,,■ ;ii: ,,i : :: ,11. i; .,\.-.ll' , ! .MM" ; N:..ii: .illllm.N; .IIIV: .:illli;il!ll]illlll:!IIIM.[|ll:i ;.ii!M ' :ii;!!MlNlillll; :,lii! ,lll!'lll:i:. : Jlli;i|l .MIIlMllidlllldlNilllNJIflllllllMllli ill' TM 



36 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



Parti-Day was introduced to the 
trade in a number of markets, includ- 
ing Green Bay, last April but no ad- 
vertising was used in the Green Bay 
area before tbe tv test began. Where 
advertising was used, the pattern in- 
volved substantial space in newspa- 
pers at the beginning followed 1>\ tv 
spots. The spots were usually five a 
week on film, both day and night and 
mostly of the 20-second variety. 

Client and agency decided to see 
what tv could do by itself with live 
commercials one minute long and 
aired by a local personality. Other 
marketing problems involved ( 1 I the 
popularity of flavors I Parti-Day fla- 
vors are chocolate, fudge, butter- 
scotch and marshmallow ) , (2) to 
what extent women, young children 
or teens are the best prospects, (3) 
the copy themes, (4) product uses. 
(5l broker merchandising support 
and other problems as well. As both 
Richard H. Partridge, Parti-Dav v.p. 
for sales and James B. Wilson, ac- 
count supervisor at D'Arcy, explained 
to sponsor, they expect the test to 
provide definite answers for use in 
other markets. 

The client voted a budget of $9,980 
for 26 weeks firm on WBAY-TV. 
Green Bay. This pays for 10 spots 
per week during the day on five pro- 
grams — three kid shows, a home and 
farm show and a women's service 
show. 

An important part of the campaign 
was support provided by the Otto L. 
Kuehn Co., Parti-Day's food brokers 
in the Green Bay area as well as in 
Milwaukee, where the firm is head- 
quartered and where Parti-Day is 
also distributed. Kuehn's salesmen 
sell the brand through about a dozen 
wholesalers in the Green Bay area 
and through A&P and National Tea, 
which buy for their Green Ba\ area 
stores via Milwaukee. None of the 
sales figures referred to in this story 
include the two chains. 

A team of six Kuehn salesmen, 
supervised by Marvin W. Bower, the 
broker's merchandising director, and 
briefed by Robert Parker, the sta- 
tion's marketing chief, kicked off the 
campaign. During the first week the 
ad drive was aired, Kuehn's detail 
men went around to stores with kits 
containing full details of the tv test. 
They have also been instrumental 
in arranging for in-store demonstra- 
tions by dairy firms tying in the 



TWO-PRONGED DRIVE PUSHES PRODUCT 




1. 



Live tv commercials: Russ Widoe, WBAY-TV personality, sells Parti-Day via min- 
ute plugs. Shown is birthday party, featuring product, given to children on the air 




In-store demonstrations: Dairy firms, plugging ice cream, tie in Parti-Da} dessert 
topping. About 20 demonstrations have been run or are planned in (ireen Ba> area 



Parti-Day toppings with ice cream. 
The broker's sales crew is cooper- 
ating with sponsor by providing fig- 
ures on the sales progress of Parti- 
Day. Also cooperating with facts, fig- 
ures and background information 
are, in addition to Partridge. Wilson. 
Bower and Parker, the general man- 
ager of WBAY-TV, Haydn Evans, 
and Robert J. Curry, D'Arcy account 
executive. The result is a uniquelj 
public picture of a tv test and its 



marketing by-products as it unfolds. 

Among the information provided 
to sponsor was the results of a tele- 
phone survey made under the agen- 
cy's supervision less than two months 
after the tv commercials started run- 
ning. The survey covered 302 people 
called in the city of Green Bay and 
picked at random In the interviewers. 

Curry told sponsor: "One thing 
stands out in this report, which we 
feel dramatical!) points out how ef- 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



37 



fective tv advertising is in creating 
consumer awareness of a product: 
61.3% of the persons interviewed had 
heard of Parti-Day toppings — even 
though this product had been adver- 
tised less than two months. 

"W e also feel that it is significant 
that 74.6% of the people who had 
heard of Parti-Day could trace their 
awareness directly to Parti-Day's tv 
advertising." 

The awareness figures are a com- 
bination of two questions asked re- 
spondents. An unaided recall query, 
asking the sample which brands of 
topping they were familiar with, 
evoked the Parti-Day name in nearly 
22% of the cases. At the end of the 
interview, when it was no longer 
necessary to hide the fact that the 
survey was made for Parti-Day, inter- 
viewers asked whether the person had 
heard of Parti-Day. Another 40% 
answered affirmatively. 

The 22% figure elicited in the un- 
aided recall question put Parti-Day 
second. The only brand to top it was 
Hershey's topping, a non-aerosol 
product which has been around for 
years (Hershey's lack of national ad- 
vertising has long been the despair 
of admen ) . Other questions also put 
Parti-Day second in Green Bay city 
in terms of (1) percent of people 
who had ever purchased a topping, 
(2) percent with a topping now in 
the home and (3) brand popularity. 

High on the list of marketing prob- 
lems being probed in the test is the 
popularity of various flavors. One of 
the reasons the Green Bay area was 
chosen was the fact that it is a good 
place to sell chocolate and ice cream. 



The latter product is commonly used 
with toppings (or syrups, as some 
people call them) and chocolate is, 
by far, the most popular flavor. 

In view of this fact, the first analy- 
sis of sales by flavor turned out to be 
a surprise. Through the chocolate 
and fudge flavors were expected to 
run well ahead of the others, a check 
after the test had run two months 
showed the following figures for case 
shipments: chocolate, 965; fudge, 
917; butterscotch, 876; marshmallow, 
742. 

The telephone survey, which sought 
information on flavors on hand, also 
threw expectations a little askew. 
Percent of respondents with the vari- 
ous Parti-Day flavors on hand were 
as follows: chocolate, 8.6; fudge, 3.3; 
marshmallow, 1.7; butterscotch, 5.3. 
Note that the case shipment figures 
were for the Green Bay area, while 
the survey covered Green Bay city 
only. 

While information on flavors is 
important in ad planning, it is ob- 
viously dangerous to project figures 
on one market to the country as 
whole. Furthermore, client and 
agency executives have found so far 
that every market is different. How- 
ever, the survey was valuable in that 
it showed the popularity of competi- 
tive flavors in the city studied. 

Among other valuable data col- 
lected was information on reasons 
why users like Parti-Day. In order, 
the reasons were: (1) ease of use, 
convenient container, 75.2%; (2) 
like taste, best flavor, 56.5%; (3) 
keeps well, no refrigeration, 18.8%. 
The importance of these answers is 



BRAND AWARENESS DUE TO TV 

SOURCE OF BRAND AWARENESS 



Brand "H" 

Television -9% 

Saw in store 29.3 

Used for years 50.2 

Children -9 

Other 2.0 

Don't know 16.7 



Parti-Day 


Brand "S" 


Brand "J" 


74.6% 


2.3% 


3.2% 


16.9 


53.5 


65.4 
6.5 


5.1 




3.2 


3.4 


34.9 


16.1 




9.3 


6.5 



Piiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiw 



that no unexpected reason for liking 
Parti-Day cropped up. 

Parti-Day is easy to use. The can 
merely has to be shaken and then in- 
verted. Pressing the spout forces out 
the liquid. Unlike most aerosol prod- 
ucts, it does not foam. The aerosol 
method avoids messy spooning 
pouring or dripping. As for its 
keeping qualities, it stores indefi- 
nitely — even without refrigeration. 
There is, perhaps, one disadvantage 
to the package: unless shaken, the 
gas propellent will merely escape 
from the container when the spout is 
pressed, ultimately making the pack- 
age useless. For this reason, demon- 
stration commercials are important. 

The Green Bay survey also got 
into the question of who made the 
initial purchase of the Parti-Day. In 
common with most brands, it was 
found that the housewife made the 
first purchase. In the case of Parti- 
Day, husbands bought it in 6.8% of 
the cases. Children played a minor 
role in the initial purchase, though 
in the case of Parti-Day they played 
a more important part than with the 
other brands. 

The question on the source of 
brand awareness pinned down with- 
out question the effectiveness of tv. 
As pointed out by Curry of D'Arcy, 
74.6% of those who knew about 
Parti-Day became aware of it through 
tv. Another 16.9% first learned of it 
when they saw it in the store and 
5.1% of the respondents heard about 
it through their children. In the case 
of Hershey, about half of those 
knowing about the brand said they 
had used it for years and nearly 
30% could trace their awareness to 
seeing it in the store. In the cases of 
two other major brands, the saw-it- 
in-the-store factor was the most im- 
portant. 

Though the agency hasn't said 
anything about it, the relatively low 
influence of the moppet set in Parti- 
Day sales has undoubtedly started 
off some re-thinking on the question 
of what types of programs to use. 
Three of the five shows being used 
on WBAY are children's programs, 
on the surface an overly heavy em- 
phasis in view of the Green Bay re- 
search findings. 

It is probably true, however, that 
children are important consumers of 
Parti-Day, though they've exerted 
(Please turn to page 64) 



38 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 




Copy image created on tv (in this case by KMTV's Jean Hughes) is transferred to editorial-type movie display ads and radio spots 



Imagery -Transfer works in reverse 



W Omaha theater chain lets tv spots supply the primary 
image which is then transferred to newspapers and radio 

W Better integration of promotion enables coordinated 
drive on age groups, fast turn-around in emergencies 



#%ilmittedl\ . it's the teenage audi- 
ence that's keeping the movies in 
business. 

Motion picture advertising that 
overlooks this vast army is, of course, 
missing a bet. But to hit it exclu- 
sively is to tap only a portion of 
the movie-going reserve. This is why 
a Midwest theater chain is using a 
checker-board pattern of tv tied to 
unique newspaper and radio support. 
Primary aims: a multi-target ap- 
proach and quick schedule changes to 
meet emergencies. What they've 
learned could be applied by any ad- 
vertiser with a universal commodity 



restricted by usage to one age group. 

Here's how Cooper Foundation, 
which operates a chain of theaters in 
Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Colorado 
builds double the grosses of other 
cities, according to Cooper's Omaha 
city manager. Phil Keough: 

(1) One-two, kid-adult punch. Kid 
show participations plug a movie 
with kid appeal in the afternoon. 
Kids are urged to ask "Mommy and 
Daddy" to take them to see it. but 
the matter isn't dropped there. Late 
evening participations in a person- 
ality show are aimed directly at 
"Mommy and Daddy," so that the 



direct request or corner-of-the-eve 
impression from the afternoon isn't 
lost. 

(2) Personality vs. late movies. 
A personality show (Jack Paar cut- 
ins on KMTV in Omaha, for exam- 
ple) are preferred to late movie par- 
ticipations. The theory: People who 
can be sold new movies basically are 
not fans of the oldies. 

(3) Local contests. The family au- 
dience is the obvious target here. 
An amateur vocal bout aired every 
Sunday afternoon on KMTV. The 
contest was restricted to songs from 
"South Pacific* and was the major 
promotional push behind the opening 
of the picture and installation of 
Todd-AO gear in Omaha. The 15- 
minute program. Two on the Aisle. 
also promoted other Cooper films 
(see picture above) . The end of the 
"South Pacific" run is nowhere in 
sight, but the program will be re- 

(Please turn to page 64) 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



39 



How to get glamour out of radio 



^ Briggs & Co. (Washington, D. C.) consistently rates 
No. 1 in consumer polls after radio loyalty drive 

^ Glamour and coverage were achieved by stressing 
personalities and by checker-boarding time periods 



W 



hen alls said and done, any 
product — no matter whether national, 
local, or regional — is sold just one 
way: locally. If it doesn't ultimately 
move across somebody's counter, 
that's that. 

This truism is so utterly obvious 
that the radio broadcasters for years 
have tried to use it as a basic sales 
tool (particularly for national spot). 
They've pointed out how radio hugs 
the consumer like the skin on his 



back — it's in his parlor, bedroom, 
kitchen, basement, car, tractor, boat. 
Ergo, they say, radio is the ultimate 
in on-the-spot leverage. 

To which they often get this cyni- 
cal reply : Radio lacks the glamorous 
touch, and its audience is split up 
among too many stations. 

But now a notable success in 
Washington, D. C. adds a strong note 
of realism to the whole debate. This 
is the situation in capsule form: 




• The advertiser is Briggs & Co. 
(meat products; also an ice cream 
line). 

• Briggs has topped the competi- 
tion in many vital lines — both na- 
tional and private brands — by waging 
an intensely local war. 

• Radio historically has been the 
major weapon. 

• Glamour has been no problem 
for Briggs — they use station per- 
sonalities to achieve that effect. 

• Nor has fragmentation of the 
audience been any obstacle — Briggs 
buys on a hop-scotch pattern that 
covers the clock. 

Here is the step by step account 
of Briggs' impact on the field from 
the time they packaged their first 
frankfurter 20 years ago. 

The Briggs brothers — Raymond, 
Luther, and Lester — realized that to 
succeed, a local product must create 
a setting for itself. To combat the 
advertising barage of national brands, 
they needed a medium that could 
give them "first person" contact with 
the market, create a personal feeling 
about the company, highlight a 
"made fresh daily, delivered fresh 
daily" angle. 

With a distribution of virtually 
nothing in 1939, Briggs spent what 
it could for local personalities con- 
sidered strong enough to do the job. 
In the first year, they made gains and 
were able to add to the line. 

But after the war Briggs faced a 
second problem in addition to the ad- 
vertising heat of national brands. 
This was the trend toward private 
labels. Many advertised brands found 
themselves battling for supermarket 
shelf space. Briggs was no excep- 
tion. 



In-store work by WTOP's Mark Evans 
(r) was part of campaign. He compares 
prices with packer Raymond Briggs and 
Acme asst. store mgr. Harold Thomas (c) 



Consumer loyalty resulting from heavy 
use of radio helped overcome national 
brand and private label size advantages 



40 







"We knew we had to concent rale 
on creating a consumer army who 
would do something hesides just ask." 
>a\s Briggs & Co. President Raymond 
Briggs, Sr. "Only demand would 
keep us on the shelves." 

"'We needed a central personality 
to spark the mobilization," he says, 
"and his influence had to extend be- 
yond the consumer to the grocery 
trade itself. A substantia] part of our 
[Success in staying on the shelves 
would depend on the goodwill of 
supermarket managers and chain 
buyers. 

Mark Evans (WTOP Radio per- 
sonality) was selected to carry the 
Standard for Briggs in 1950. Briggs 
bought participations in his after- 
noon show aimed at housewives. The 
company and Evans carefully treaded 
[the psychological tightrope of copy 
points that would not condemn pri- 
vate labels, but at the same time 
would create a greater awareness of 
brand for Briggs. 

Copy points that Evans stressed 
called for these actions by the con- 
quer, in addition to "just asking": 

• If the store is temporarily out 
of the merchandise, ring for mana- 
ger and request it. 

• Don't be talked into switching 
brands. 

• Look for the bigger display of 
Briggs' products. 

That last bit of psychology placed 
the store manager in the position of 
having to give Briggs some sort of 
display. "Evans' army would expect 
it as a matter of course," says Briggs. 

Meantime many products were los- 
ing out for lack of shelf space. Briggs 
held its own. In 1951, it showed 
55' , mentions in consumer prefer- 
ence surveys. 

When Evans went into tv in 1950. 
Briggs went with him, using partici- 
pations in his 7 p.m. show until net- 
work preemptions took it off. 

By 1955, consumer surveys showed 
Briggs clearly ahead of the pack in 
number of mentions. It averaged 
over 60% mentions for its frankfur- 
ters I with Armour and Swift fluctu- 
ating between <>' < and 9%). Pork 
sausage: 60%. Sliced luncheon 
meats: 39%. Ham: 29%. Bacon: 
24%. In the last two items, Swift 
was breathing close on its neck, has 
now overtaken it in ham, while Rath 
is ahead in bacon. (Currently Briggs 
(Please turn to page 63) 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 




MAIL POOPS POOR SANTA 



Jolly Old St. Nicholas at jolly young (seven years) KTVH, Wichita, Kans., 
is going into retirement for 11 more months after writing 4,135 personal letters 
to Santa fans in 238 Kansas towns. Here's his report to SPONSOR'S publisher 
on the success of the KTVH Christmas season, and a one-week mail gimmick. 

Dear Little Norm: 

HO HO HO AND UGH! I hope you had a Happy Yule, 
and that you enjoyed all the nice things that I left 
you. I know that this letter is getting to you a little 
late, but as you know, just before I started on my 
yearly trip to visit all you good boys and girls I had 
suggested to the parents who listened to KTVH's 10 to 
10:30 p.m. news, weather and sports strip each day that 
I would write you children a personal letter. 

WELL ... I am just now getting my arm out of its 
sling ... and the writers' cramp out of my typewriter. 

I answered 4,135 letters personally, and person- 
a lly I 'm pooped ! 

You might be interested to know that these 4,135 
letters were sent to children in 238 different towns 
and cities in the state of Kansas alone (not to 
mention many out-of-state letters as well). 

This offer of mine was only mentioned on the 
three shows listed above AND only for one week! 

Yours for bigger and better mail pull. 

Santa Claus 





t o n e • 


. - 

5 3 n f 


__*_r* ,J 




• 


titti 


• ' ' \ 


V 




1 


9 el a u 


ne 


" notih p 


J Ot 


'* M 

iiY..v. 



41 




Capsule case histories of successful t 
local and regional television campaigi 



AUTOMOBILES 

SPONSOR: McLean Pontiac Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Although the year 1958 has been a 
very trying one for the automobile industry and its retail 
sales agencies, a Portsmouth, Va. Pontiac agency which 
used television has a different story to tell. During the first 
quarter of 1958, the sales of the McLean Pontiac Corp. 
had materially decreased over the past five years, and the 
company made a thorough study of what might be the best 
medium to advertise. During March 1958, the agency com- 
menced a schedule of one-minute participations in WAVY- 
TV's Early Late Show. "From that point on our sales volume 
showed a remarkable increase," stated Richard J. Davis, 
McLean's secretary. "There were many instances where a 
displayed automobile was purchased without the buyer ac- 
tually appearing at the agency, after having seen the vehicle 
on television." The company strongly believes that its suc- 
cess in 1958 was due solely to television advertising, and 
plans to devote most of its 1959 budget to WAVY-TV. 

WAVY-TV, Norfolk-Portsmouth Participations 

NEW HOMES 

SPONSOR: Tegtmeier Realty Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Several television spots in a three 
day period sold hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of 
new homes for a Omaha realtor. On Friday, 14 November, 
the Tegtmeier Realty Co. purchased one 10-second spot on 
television station KETV, Omaha. The following day, Satur- 
day, three more 10-second spots appeared. Sunday saw the 
beginning of Tegtmeier 's new five-minute Sunday afternoon 
news on KETV. As a direct result of just these few an- 
nouncements, Harvey W. Tegtmeier, the firm's president and 
general manager reported that he sold six homes with an 
aggregate valuation of $90,000. "In each case," he said, 
"the purchaser mentioned seeing the advertisements on tele- 
vision." The only medium used by the realty company for 
this campaign is television, and the only station KETV. 
"These results are beyond our highest expectations," said 
Mr. Tegmeier. "It certainly proves tv's impact." The com- 
pany purchased a 13-week campaign on the tv station. 

KETV, Omaha Participations & Sponsorship 



PERSONAL LOANS 

SPONSOR: Mercantile Acceptance Co. AGENCY: Dire. 

Capsule case history: After only three weeks on KTVl 
the Mercantile Acceptance Co. of San Francisco reporte 1 
that the dollar volume from one branch directly accountabl 
to television was somewhere between $10,000 and $15,00( 
Jack Cole, vice president of the loan company, reported the 
in the two weeks before the KTVU schedule commencec 
business was way off in his company, and, in fact, this wa 
the case throughout the loan field. However, since going o 
television in October, he reports business has increased t 
the point where it is much better than the month of Septen 
ber, generally regarded as a high point in the industry. Mi 
Cole further reported that six phone calls had even bee: 
received at Mercantile's executive offices on Market Streel 
all of which reported tv as their source of interest. Mercan 
tile Acceptance's schedule on KTVU calls for nine an 
nouncements per week, within Roller Derby, Topper, Mys 
tery Strip and Racket Squad. The cost per lead is low 

KTVU, San Francisco Participation 



FARMERS' PICNIC 

SPONSOR: Rochelle Chamber of Commerce AGENCY: Direc 

Capsule case history: Each year the Rochelle Chambe 
of Commerce in Rochelle, 111., a small farming community 
located in the North Central portion of the state, holds ; 
farmers' picnic. This annual affair is somewhat of a cros 
between an agricultural fair and a farmers' market — and it; 
success or failure has an important bearing on the state o 
Rochelle's economy. Although Rochelle is almost 30 air mile 
from Rockford, Mike Pullin, entertainment chairman of th 
1958 Farmers' Picnic, called upon television station WREX 
TV, Rockford, to put the annual affair across. The 195o 
Picnic was one of the most successful in Rochelle's history 
In a letter to WREX-TV general manager Joe Baisch, Pullin 
said: "The large crowd was certainly very much due to the 
efforts of WREX-TV. . . . Furthermore, the air time on 
WREX-TV helped us to keep within our limited budget.' 
The Farmers' Picnic committee was so gratified with results, 
it has already decided to use WREX-TV again in 1959. 
WREX-TV, Rockford Announcement 



42 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



NEW GAME! FIND THE FARMER* 
— in the Land of Milk and Jfoney! 










Answer's easy. They're both farmers — well-heelea aairymen nvin 
in the bountiful Land of Milk and Money. This market of ours is story- 
book stuff . . . scores of small cities and thousands of big dairy farms 
. . . 400,000 TV families enjoying CBS-ch. 2 t~' 
So, cultivate our Farmers, and win the Gam 

* A Wisconsin farmer is distinguishable today only by his add 




SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



43 



Kan 



THAN 



A 



LASKA 



-A, 



MetropolitaTNMchita and/Hutchinson are twin cities in 
the heart of ricfNg^owing Central Kansas — an area 
more prosperous . .Tnrote populated . . . than Alaska. 
This big and still-growing ma>tetis covered completely 
by KTVH, exclusive /CBS-TV for Cental KansasyThis 
heavily concentrated^ area of well-paid indusTmi^prkers 
and successful fanners represents more than halyoT 
State's population. TO SELL KANSAS . . . BUf KTVH. 



BASIC 



IINSON 



44 



^^^^ REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY BLAIR T£LFV LQN ASSOCIATES 

DlH. IN HUTCHINSON ■ HOWARD P E/ERSON, GEN. MGR. 

SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 



PHILIP MORRIS 

I Cont'd from page 35 ) 

and simple," says Mr. Larkin. "It's a 
long-range one, too, centered on con- 
structive, up-beat ideas, research and 
programs which will help the chain- 
Store. 

The "Think Retail"' program is 
[geared specifically to better store 
management and to "space manage- 
ment," says Mr. Larkin. "Space 
shortage is not the problem in chain 
stores today; it's what you do with 
the space you've got." 

He cites, for example, this frequent 
occurrence in a food store. "The sup- 
plier will come in with a cigarette 
rack and in exchange for the fixture 
hell get 20 r v of the shelf space 
for his product. But tests show his 
brand accounts for only 5' < of the 
store sales." 

Mr. Larkin's recommendation: in- 
ventory control which allots space 
according to consumer tastes and 
therefore to actual sales. If Marl- 
Iboro (PM's top-selling brand) gets 
1 20 per cent of a store's sales, it 
should have an equivalent amount of 
[display space, he alleges (with this 
formula applicable to all brands). 

A new wrinkle on the old face of 
in-store merchandising appeared re- 
cently when P. Lorillard reportedly 
contracted with a large food chain to 
lease — actually rent — shelf space for 
its product line. 

Another instance of the store re- 
linquishing control over its facilities, 
this new arrangement is understood 
to provide a chain retailer with from 
$5 to $10 monthly for eye-level shelf 
position I on a year-long contract 
with 30-day cancellation. PM's posi- 
tion is this: if Lorillard lor any 
other company) doesn't sell well in 
the market or the store, the retailer 
is being cheated by ( 1 I buying too 
much inventory, ( 2 1 not being able 
to sell it, (3) thus accumulating un- 
fresh stock and — throughout the en- 
tire operation — (4 I losing control 
over his space and his stock. 

Much of the confusion and the 
hubbub at the retail level comes from 
the fact that many chain stores are 
"trying to turn into drug stores or 
department stores over night, and this 
just can't be done," savs Bob Larkin. 
"They're adding new lines right and 
left and in the shuffle many managers 
are relinquishing authority and con- 
trii|. 

Some chains stock as manv as 35 



different cigarette brands, a confus- 
ing array if shelved haphazardly. 
PM manufactures six cigarette brands 
I Marlboro. Philip Morris regular and 
king. Parliament, Benson & Hedges 
and Spud l plus eight pipe tobaccos 
and one cigar. 

The brand with which Bob Larkin 
has had the most fun personally is 
Marlboro, which has seen a phe- 
nomenal rise in sales because of its 
original flip-top box two years ago 
and the success of its unique adver- 
tising campaign featuring masculine 
Marlboro men with tattoos and mag- 
netic glances. 

Mr. Larkin proved to have one of 
the most magnetic! One of the first 
men to be featured in the print series 
of Marlboro men. "I put my bald 
head on the Marlboro chopping 
block" at the request of Roj:ei 
Greene, PM vice president for ad- 
vertising. 

The reaction to the pretesting ( be- 
fore appearing in the Satevepost and 
New Yorker ) brought what the mer- 
chandiser-model terms a "mixed 
rave. 

But most of the smokers thought 
him "masculine, an executive, strong 



and clean-cut. a man of decision, 
sophisticated and a perfectionist," 
exactly the playback PM sought. Mr. 
Larkin. himself, found the photo- 
graphic impression flattering de- 
spite which he shunted three enor- 
mous blowups — sent to his wife — to 
one of the dimmer corners of the base- 
ment. 

Lots of other things do occur to 
the PM executive, however, and these 
are usually sparkling, progressive 
ideas about cigarette and chain store 
merchandising which he launches into 
programs every day. He has a mer- 
chandising force of 10 specialists, 
most of whom are in the field. 

He himself spends about a week a 
month on the road, frequently ap- 
pearing as a major speaker before 
trade groups. He's been a guest lec- 
turer at Columbia U. and New York 
1 niversit) s graduate school of mar- 
keting, and has been called on fre- 
quently to discuss his special fields of 
interest before many advertising and 
sales clubs. His blend of professional 
knowledge with an appealing light 
and humorous touch makes his diplo- 
matic dose of advice not only pala- 
table but sought-after. . ^ 




THINGS ARE 



POPPING 



i 

Toes tapping. Fingers snapping/It: .^ the bouncy new sound 
of WBZ, sparked by the greatest collection of deejays in 
all New England. Popular music for everybody ... a fine 
mix of current pops, great standards of all time, and tomor- 
row's hits. And there's more. Fresh, lively news coverage. 
New, tight program lineup. It's got the town buzzing — the 
ratings jumping. It's the sound of Boston's Most Popular 
Station. d i 





°| AL 10 30 
BOSTON 



WBZA SPRINGFIELD 



Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc. 



-I'uNsui; 



31 JANUARY 1959 



45 



As network selling practices change, SPONSOR ASKS: 

How will the end of the 

"must buy" rule affect 




With networks no longer requir- 
ing advertisers to buy a minimum 
number of stations, station men 
diseuss its effect on the affiliates. 

George Kapel, gen. sales manager, 
KBET-TV, Sacramento, Cal. 

One thing is certain: selling tele- 
vision is going to be more interesting 
for everyone in 1959. The new CBS 
dollar volume factor replacing the 
"must buy" list guarantees that most 



It will 
become 
increasingly 
competitive 



of us cannot afford the luxury of 
complacency. This applies to agen- 
cy timebuyers, national representa- 
tives and station salesmen. 

The network picture has become in- 
creasingly competitive and network 
advertisers have appeared to benefit 
from this newly obtained flexibility. 

But flexibility without clearance is 
a hollow gain. For example, sup- 
pose Lux orders Station X for its 
Playhouse Friday nights, but Schlitz 
doesn't because of a limited sales 
volume in the market involved. Even 
if the station is allowed to carry the 
series weekly by deleting Schlitz com- 
mercials, the main problem of lost 
revenue is not solved. The station 
could elect to buy a syndicated show 
for alternate weeks to sell locally or 
regionally, but I doubt that either 
the network or station would like this. 
Lux could suffer a loss of audience 
because the same program was not 
presented weeklv. The station would 
find it almost impossible to buv 
Grade AA syndicated products with 
less than 52 runs. And what does the 
station do with the syndicated films 
if Schlitz were to change its mind and 
want to add the market at a later 
date? 



Is the answer to be found in a net- 
work co-op plan? If so, wouldn't 
spot advertisers be interested in al- 
ternate week announcement buys? 

These questions will be resolved 
successfully not by one man but 
rather by the collective thinking of 
a youthful dynamic industry, which 
remains that way because its people 
like challenge and change or else they 
would long ago have found easier 
ways to make a living. 

Joe M. Baisch, gen. mgr., WREX-TV, 
Rockford, III. 

The CBS and NBC networks' modi- 
fication of selling rules by elimina- 
tion of "must buy" in favor of "mini- 
mum-dollar purchases" should bene- 
fit some intermediate and secondary 
stations. 

I don't believe any serious-thinking 
segment within our dynamic industry 
feels there will be any disastrous re- 
action to the network structure in its 
present form or that there will be 
more than minor adjustments as re- 
lates to individual stations by these 
new policies. 

The minimum-dollar approach will 
serve well the networks, the agencies 
and their clients, and our individual 
stations. Its adoption will best serve 
the industry by tending to prevent 



It will benefit 
intermediate, 
secondary 
stations 



additional federal regulation. I be- 
lieve it is a significant tribute to those 
decision-makers, the network policy 
proclaimers, who have responded to 
their responsibilities by the timely 
elimination of "must buv" in favor 
of "minimum-dollar buy." I believe 
this action will preclude further gov- 
ernmental regulation in an important 




arena of the industry's business coi 
duct. 

In evaluating the effect of "min| 
mum-dollar buy" in our distinctiv 
area market, it must be noted the 
Rockford has always been an "o\ 
tional buy." As a result of servin 
the WREX-TV family of cities wit, 
good signal service, strong selling an 
promotion, backed with solid impo: 
tant public service, an important tel< 
vision market of character and ii 
tegrity endorsed with viewing loyalt 
has been carved deep into Souther 
Wisconsin-Northern Illinois, in th 
Rock River Industrial Valley. An 
the straightforward selling of our ni 
tional representative, and our contir 
uous campaigning in national trad 
publications, have placed Rockfort 
on an almost automatic "must buv 
of optional station lists. 

That some dollars may be re-alb 
cated by certain advertisers fror 
"must buy" areas could well serve t 
funnel more revenue deeper int 
pipelines reaching the secondar 
areas where the cost factors are res 
sonable and the program rating p( 
tentialities high. 

As a potentially important by-pn 
duct of the "minimum buy" (becaus 
of this new flexibility to network a( 
vertisers) television may now sipho 
additional budget appropriatior 
from printed media. And more mone 
in the tv treasurv will contribute 
the medium's further vitality. 

Irving Waugh, general manager, WSA 
TV, Nashville, Tenn. 

It is only human for those wh 
have always been categorized as basi< 
who have occupied space on a limite 
"must buy" list to be repelled by th 
loss of exclusivity. There are, hov 
ever, more pertinent business cor 
siderations involved in such a chana 
as the elimination of the "must buy 
method of operation. 

At the moment it is apparently th; 
expedient thing to do, and while ne 
work sales may benefit temporaril! 



46 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 195 




stations? 



rom what is surely to be labeled 
reater flexibility, I fail to see how 
be structure of networking will be 
trengthened by the move. 

It is possibly too early to definite- 
ly say how this change will affect 
arious markets. But with the sales 
atterns that are in effect at the net- 



Station 
programing 
becomes more 
important 



wk level, it is obvious that some 
tations will lose revenue. 

However, there are certain yard- 
ticks in buying that advertisers will 
ave to continue to use regardless of 
must buy" or "minimum buy." 

In Nashville, where the market 
annot be overlapped or reached by 
ther tv stations, we don't expect the 
Elation to change appreciably as 
:>ng as a favorable economic climate 
xists. 

WSM-TV. due to the strength and 
restige built through a third of a 
entury by itself and its sister station, 
jVSM Radio, is in the fortunate posi- 
ion of having a number of supple- 
lentary advantages to offer adver- 
isers — national as well as local. 

The nationally known and recog- 
ized pool of top entertainment talent 
n the pop, rock-and-roll, and coun- 
ry fields, and the production know- 
ow that is unique in this size mar- 
et has provided the stations with a 
,ack log of fabulous acceptance and 
n audience faith that has grown 
nroughout the years. 

Many factors go into market selec- 
ion. but we hope that it is not too 
lid fashioned to suppose that ground- 
work laid during many years of 
roadcastin<i. that prestige and popu- 
irity. ability to program and sell cre- 
tively will still play a part, a large 
ne, in market consideration. ^ 



olPONSOR 



WCSII-TY 



NBC Affiliate 



Portland, Maine 




IT DOESN'T TAKE A VERY 
SHARP PENCIL TO FIGURE IT. 



In fact, one look at the Nov. '58 ARB Metro Report (and 
a little addition) will show that SIX scored more quarter 
hour firsts than the other two stations combined. 

Your Weed TV man has five straight years of surveys 
that similarly prove the marked viewer preference for the 
programs of Northern New England's service-minded SIX. 
Ask him about them. 




Q 




RADIO STATIONS 

OF MAINE 



WCSH-TV, Portland 
WLBZ-TV, Bangor 
WCSH-Radio, 'Portland 
WLBZ-Radio, Bangor 
WRDO-Radio, Augusta 



A matching schedule on Ch. 2 in Bangor saves an extra 5% 



31 JANUARY 1959 



47 




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RADIO BASICS/FEB. 



Facts & figures about radio today 



1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



Radio station index 



1958 1957 



49.2 
radio 
homes 





48.3 
radio 
homes 



51.1 50.2 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: A. C. Nielsen estimate, 1 Nov. each 
year, homes figures in millions. 





End of December 1958 








Stations CPs not New station 


New station* 




on air on air requests 


bids in hearing 


Am 


1 3326 1 114 1 470 


1 


119 


Fm 


578 1 117 44 
End of December 1957 


1 


30 


Am 


1 3195 1 100 1 395 


1 


116 


Fm 


537 53 39 




9 


Source: 


FCC monthly reports, commercial stations. *November each 


year. 





Radio set index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1958 



1957 



95,400,000 
37,200,000 



90,000,000 
35,000,000 



10,000,000* 10,000,000 



142,600,000 135,000,000 



Source: RAB, 1 July 1958, 1 July 1957, 
sets in working order. *No new information. 



Radio set sales index 



Type 



Home 
Auto 



Total 



Nov. 1958 Nov. 1957 

1,031,674 925,620 6,686,506 7,689,841 

476,977 563,066 3,156,595 4,925,157 

1,508,651 1,488,686 9,843,101 12,614,998 

Source: Electronic Industries Assn. (formerly RETJIA). Home figures are retail sales, 
auto figures are factory production. 



11 Months 
1958 



11 Months 
1957 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 

pilllllllllllllllillllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIli 

HOW A RADIO STATION AUDIENCE GROWS: 4 TYPICAL EXAMPLES, BY DAY PARTS 



New York network station 



Columbus independent station 2.6 



Birmingham network station 



San Diego independent station 1.1 



Rating per 

broadcast 


3-hr. 
cume 


2.7 


7.0 


2.6 


5.2 


2.0 


5.6 


1.1 


4.4 



Weekly 
cume 



6-9 a.m. 


11.1 


9 a.m.-Noon 


11.4 


Noon-3 p.m. 


10.5 


3-6 p.m. 



8.6 



4-week 
cume 


Episodes 
per home 


18.4 


34.6 


25.2 


25.0 


21.6 


22.3 


17.5 


14.5 



Source: NSI, December 1958, except San Diego, which is November 1958; in-home Monday through Friday only. Per 
broadcast ratings are by 15-minute periods. Cumulative homes are unduplicated. Episodes per home are averages for 
four-week period. Stations were picked at random, are not necessarily representative of audience levels in each market. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiuii [[mum ii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu nil i i nun 



50 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 



11111111111 



1959 



as basic as the alphabet 




EGYPTIAN 



Since its appearance in the 
Garden of Eden, the serpent 
has been an important 
symbol in the writings and 
legends of mankind. To the 
Egyptians, this snake-figure 
signified cobra. 



PHOENICIAN 



Great fishermen as well as 
sailors, the men of Tyre 
varied the twisting form of 
the Egyptian word-sign and 
made it their letter nun (fish). 



GREEK 



Changing as it passed from 
one ancient region to an- 
other, the nun found its way 
across the Mediterranean to 
Greece. There, it became the 
Athenians' letter nu. 



ROMAN 



From Greek colonies in Italy, 
Etruscan merchants brought 
the letter to Rome where 
stone masons eventually 
shaped it in the form we 
know as N. 

Historical data by 

Dr. Donald J. Lloyd, 

Wayne State University 



New or long-established, every product deserves 
the powerful sales-thrust provided by WWJ. Dealers 
welcome WWJ-advertised brands because they know the 
station moves merchandise. Listeners prefer WWJ be- 
cause it gives them the best of modern radio service. 

Now is the time to line up Hugh Roberts, Faye Eliza- 
beth, Dick French, Bob Maxwell, and Jim DeLand— to be 
represented in the exclusive WWJ "radio-vision" studios 
at Northland and Eastland Shopping Centers. Buy WWJ 
— it's the basic thing to do! 



M M M M M M ■ AM and FM 

WWJ RADIO 

Detroit's Basic Radio Station 



Owned and operated by The Detroit News 

NBC Affiliate 

National Representatives. Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 




JLNIote how wwj 
hits the target 

Seventy per cent of Michigan's 
population commanding 75 
per cent of the state's buying 
power lives within WWJ's day- 
time primary coverage area. 



10 1 SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



51 



"Imagin' 



me goin' ta collidge!" WJAR-TV made nationwide headlines recently when it 
initiated a live TV course on the history and philosophy of communism. Full 
academic credit was given by Providence College and enthusiastic letters poured 
in. Daring, imaginative, unorthodox local programming like this is the biggest 
single reason why WJAR-TV consistently 
walks off with the lion's share of the 

audience in the Providence Market. Cock-of-the-walk in the PROVIDENCE MARKET 

NBC • ABC • Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 




WJAR-TV 



CHANNEL 10 




52 



SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 






What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



31 JANUARY 1959 

Capyrlght 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The new Congress shows signs of moving slowly on communications and ad 
matters: Obviously, the legislators don't particularly know where they want to go, 
when or how. 

The Senate Commerce Committee has set a long line of hearings, all but the dates, but 
the pattern as yet is hazy. The House Commerce Committee has no idea about what will fol- 
low its scheduled reappraisal of pay-tv. 

The bill to exempt sports enterprises from the antitrust laws may founder for a good 
long time, because of the fear of many legislators that the public will get fewer 
sports on TV. This, despite compromise by sponsors of the measure permitting the anti- 
trust laws to continue to apply to radio coverage of sports events. 



Television and advertising can draw a sigh of relief at the unhorsing of Rep. 
John Blatnik (D., Minn.). 

Blatnik was chairman of a House Government Operations subcommittee, and in that 
capacity in the past few years has been conducting probes of the truthfulness of advertising. 

The Minnesota Democrat was set to embark on similar investigations this year and next, 
on a grander scale than ever, with emphasis on tv. But the committee decided to cut down on 
the number of subcommittees and reorganized the Blatnik group out of existence. 

Blatnik, bitterly disappointed, said he hoped one of the remaining subcommittees would 
take up the cudgels for him. But it appeared that this will not be done. 



The Senate Commerce Committee began this week with hearings on grants to 
the states to construct educational tv facilities: The group had tentative plans to em- 
bark next on further consideration of tv allocations. 

Member Mike Monroney (D., Okla.) was to get his wish for further hearings on tv rating 
services, probably in February, and set for New York. 

Another point on which the Committees appeared to be puzzled as to direction was that 
concerning whether to rebuild the FCC, or merely to adopt more rigid rules for FCC 
conduct of its business. 



The Supreme Court refused to consider the case in which Philco sought to 
intervene in the RCA-Westinghouse sale-trade of Cleveland and Philadelphia radio- 
tv outlets, to the extent of opposing renewal of NBC's Philadelphia licenses. 

This has the effect of upholding the Appeals Court decision directing the FCC to hear 
and consider Philco allegations that NBC operation of a station in Philadelphia would 
give RCA an advantage over Philco in the sale of electric appliances. 



The FCC might not be able to make its ban on VHF boosters stick. Senators 
representing the mountain states are up in arms. They claim the commission has 
never had much interest in seeing that small and isolated communities get service. 

Resolutions have been introduced to force the FCC to permit the VHF boosters under 
controlled conditions for at least three years. 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



53 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercial 



FILM-SCOPE 



31 JANUARY 1959 The top development of the current season in syndication to date is the movt 

cwyrioht 1959 by CBS Films to do a full scale series on videotape. 

sponsor With Robert Herridge as producer, the "live style" entertainment show (tentative title is 

publications inc. Fancy Free) will be the first major program in syndication conceived through tape. 

Here are but a few implications of this new development: 

• A breakthrough into tape programing expressly for syndication. 

• The importance of New York as a tape production center with its pool of 
Broadway and tv talent accustomed to "live" performance. 

• A new role for CBS Films as a pioneer in tape syndication, with this as one explana 
tion of the move-over of Sam Cook Digges from WCBS-TV. (Note that Herridge and othei 
new executives at CBS Films likewise came up from WCBS-TV.) 

The new show will be offered first for network sale, with four half-hours ready h) 
April and with 13 to be completed by July. 

MCA and Lucky Strike are running into some unforeseen difficulties in work- 
ing out a 35 market pattern of stations for Secret Agent 7. 

Good time clearances in mid-season are hard to come by especially since the series is (1) 
only 26 weeks long and (2) only 50% sponsored. 

The problem of finding alternate week advertisers is being eased somewhat with Genesee 
beer coming in for several New York state markets. 

Look for a month by month advance of the tape-plus-kine formula as a solu- 
tion to videotape's present coverage problems. 

The advantage of the combination is that it offers tape's rapid and inexpensive editinp 
features compared to film. 

While these kinescopes are below tape in broadcast standards, they're still acceptable tc 
a number of smaller outlets without tape equipment. 

The track record of syndicated series continues to be the best single guide to 
predicting how new episodes will likely do in the future. 

In the hotly contested top ten cities, a syndicated series such as Silent Service averaged 
17.3 in latest through December ARB ratings for 1958, which compared well with 17.5 foi 
the similar rating period in 1957 despite added competition from new outlets in San Franciscc 
and Pittsburgh. 

Here are those ratings and shares as scored in individual markets: 



54 





1958 








1957 




CITY RATING 


SHARE 


STATIONS 


RATING 


SHARE 


STATIONS 


Boston 23.8 


60% 




3 


20.3 


60% 


3 


Chicago 18.3 


31% 




4 


29.4 


54% 


4 


Los Angeles 10.6 


19% 




7 


7.3 


26% 


7 


New York 4.0 


7% 




7 


5.3 


8% 


7 


Philadelphia 26.0 


64% 




3 


16.4 


42% 


3 


Pittsburgh 25.9 


52% 




3 


29.5 


60% 


2 


San Francisco 10.8 


20% 




4 


20.6 


40% 


3 


Washington 16.8 


34% 




4 


11.2 


33% 


4 


Note: Comparison not accessible in Detroit 


and St. 


Louis because 


of hiatus. 












SPONSOR 


• 31 JANUARY li 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Humble Oil's first use of an entertainment program — CBS Films' Rendezvous 
— ended in cancellation after the first showing. 

The cause: Complaints to Humble from Texas and New Mexico viewers about story 
content. Oddly enough, the authors of the two stories involved are 0. Henry and Stephen 
Vincent Benet. 

The incident may merely reflect a sectional difference in viewpoint, since Rhein- 
gold paid a record price for the series in New York and other markets in order to get edi- 
torial supervision of scripts. 

Perhaps reflecting the limited opportunities now for the smaller syndicator 
is the report that G-K-S entered last week into merger talks with NTA. 

Previously the Gross-Krasne-Sillerman firm — organized around November — had listened 
to another syndication company's merger proposal. 

Syndicators are now more and more trying to build selling points right into 
program concepts from the start. 

These three CNP shows, for example, attempt to use this approach in different ways: 

1) Outpost In Space: derives appeal from daily headlines. 

2) The Lawless Years: capitalizes on revived interest in mood and fashions of the 
1920's. (Series is refurbished version of NBC's Barney Ruditsky.) 

3) Philip Marlowe: cashes in on the highly successful Raymond Chandler character. 

The December newspaper strike caused WCBS-TV, N. Y., to change its Para- 
mount features campaign to the past week in order to enjoy the full benefits of 
print promotion. 

The latest hypo for CBS TV flagship Late Show and Early Show, valued at $125,000, in- 
volved 30,000 lines of space, $5,000 in radio time plus outdoor and other media. 



COMMERCIALS: Anticipation of new business has resulted in a two-way ex- 
pansion at Elliot, Unger and Elliot. 

A new third studio has been taken over and Betty Luster Associates becomes EUE's 
first sales representatives for commercials and for kinescope services, which include commer- 
cials and program monitoring and checking. 

The unions situation regarding tape may well get some important clarifications 
as a result of a jurisdictional dispute between two IA-family cameramen's unions 
last week. 

A conflict arose during an Edsel commercial being made by Termini. 
The incident is expected to press home the need for simple and clear ground rules 
to keep tape free of such obstacles from now on. 

Some film commercials are missing out on a lot of impact through the wrong 
utilization of music. 

According to one jingle producer, Music Masters, certain agency producers are still 
treating music in commercials the same way music was haphazardly added on by piano in 
the days of silent films. 

Especially important is said to be the use of music in such new creative styles as slnl"- 
motion, where visual effects often depend for motivation on the use of new and special sounds 
and music. 

(For late film and commercials news, see FILM WRAP-UP, page 60.) 

31 JANUARY 1959 55 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



31 JANUARY 1959 

Copyright ISM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Stephen Riddleberger will be the next v.p. in charge of ABC's o&o stations. 

Official announcement of his switch from comptroller is due shortly. 



Allied Moving Van's buy this week of a segment of Rawhide on CBS TV had a 
touch of irony for NBC TV sales. 

For the past year Allied has been getting gratis plugs on NBC's The Price Is Right as 
a contributor to the program's loot. 



At least one spot selling operation is bent on diverting advertisers from their pen- 
chant for short spot flights. 

CBS TV Spot Sales' new client relations department is giving top priority to a 
drive for more sustained campaigns. 

Madison Avenue is not without its quaint courtly gestures: 

An agency — after resigning an account this week — got an in-transit-protection from 
NBC TV on an order that had been okayed by the client. 

The i-t-p rider holds the period until the next agency issues a written order. 



A Midwest station was lucky that it carried a Lloyd's of London policy covering 
the longevity of a treasure-hunt listener promotion. 

The contest wasn't 24-hours old when a farmer, walking his field, stumbled across 

a capsule containing the station's prize check of $50,000. 



The latest survey by a Madison Avenue agency on the radio station situation in 
the New York (17-county) metropolitan area showed the count to be: 

• 34 standard band stations, eight of them strictly lingual and racial. 

• 18 commercial fm stations, 13 of which duplicate or simulcast programs on stand- 
ard band stations. 



56 



Accountmen dealing with ad managers who never seem to know what they 
want can compare their tribulations with this recent episode: 

Between the time the copy platform was agreed on and the spot tv campaign actually 
went on the air, the ad manager of a soft goods account made changes in the audio 
and video script on 24 different occasions. 



Watch for a Midwest station to take up the challenge that there's one facet of local 
coverage that radio and tv can't match as against newspaper: the society column. 

This particular radio station — located in a medium-sized city — has lined up an ex- 
society editor and is polishing up the format before putting the column on the air. 

As is obvious, tliis type of chronicle offers the newspaper a special personal edge in 
its relations with local advertisers. 

SPONSOR • 31 JANUARY 1959 





Nothing else like it 

in Greater New York 

IN PROGRAMMING: The voice of WVNJ is 
unique. It's the only radio station in the entire 
Metropolitan New York area that plays 
just Great Albums of Music from sign on to 
sign off — 365 days a year. 

IN AUDIENCE: So different, too. So largely 
adult — so able to buy — so able to persuade 
others to buy. And in Essex County alone 
(pop. 983,000) WVNJ dominates in 
audience — in quality of audience — 
and in prestige. 

IN VALUE: It delivers the greater New York 
audience for less than 31c per thousand homes — 
by far the lowest cost of any radio station 
in the market. 

RADIO STATION OF %[\Z & T Ctuatk ^CtUS 

national rep: Broadcast Time Sales • New York, N. Y. • MU 4-6740 




SI'OJNSOK • 31 JANUARY 1959 



57 



WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 




An interview with the Speaker: In line with Corinthian's plans for expanded news pro- 
graming, Larry Rasco (1), news commentator for KGUL-TV, Houston, visited the Capitol for 
the opening of Congress. He also taped an interview with Sam Rayburn (above) for his show 




Three for a dime: That's the price that d.j. R. H. Peck, of KGW, Portland, is selling 
records for, in front of a local high school, with the proceeds going to March of Dimes 



53 



ADVERTISERS 



During a three-day sales confer- 
ence in Boston last week, Clicquot 
Club beverages unveiled what it 
calls "the nation's biggest radio 
program promotion." 

The campaign: Every Saturday 
night in selected market areas 
throughout the country, the company 
will sponsor three and one-half hours 
of dance music. 

Another promotion: As a tie-in 
with Paramount's forthcoming Danny 
Kaye picture, The Five Pennies, 
which features the Clicquot Club 
Eskimo Band of some years ago, the 
beverage company plans merchan- 
dising tie-ins, theater premieres, and 
radio and tv spots. 

Western Union will be using spot 
tv to plug a candy-gift delivery 
service, CandyGrams, Inc., with 
Reach, McClinton as the agency. 

The gimmick. W U encloses a tele- 
gram into a box of candy so that the 
message becomes an integral part of 




England's Miss Tv of '58, Janet Munro, 
arrives from London to star in Hallmark's 
Berkeley Square, via NBC TV, 5 February 



SPONSOR 



31 JANUARY 1959 



the gift box. The candy is stored in 
freezers in Western I nion offices. 

More on campaigns: 

• Bonjoiu* Instant Coffee of 

Cleveland kicked olT last week one 
of the heaviest 1. 1), saturation cam- 
paigns in the history of Detroit, via 
120 spots per week on four tv sta- 
tions. Bonjour will move to other 
markets after the 13 week Detroit 
campaign is over. Agency: Lustig 
Advertising, Cleveland. 

• In Detroit also, Nehi has granted 
the Royal Crown franchise to the 
Vernor's Ginger Ale Bottlers in that 
area. (Denman & Baker, Detroit, is 
the agency.) Royal Crown is going 
into tv spot heavily, and Denman & 
Baker is being assisted by D'Arcy, 
Nehi's national agency, with one min- 
ute film commercials, but with local 
Detroit cut-ins. 

• KleinerCs, with the biggest 
campaign in its 80-year history, 
will use daytime network tv this 
spring to promote its notions items 
and swim caps. Calling this the first 



time a notions advertiser is in net- 
work, Kleinert's will sponsor NBC 
TVs Truth in Consequences and The 
County Fair. Agency: Grey. 



Top level officials merged: Most 
Judson Dunaway Corp. officers 
have joined the Drackett Go., which 
acquired the former concern recently. 
Sam Knox, J.D. president, becomes 
executive v.p. in charge of Drackett 
Products Co. Sales; Eugene Jalbert 
becomes assistant to the president of 
Drackett; Don McDaniels, to assist- 
ant controller and George Jaques. to 
production manager. 

Strictly personnel : Kenneth Ar- 
lington, named general product 
manager of the Toilet Articles divi- 
sion of Colgate . . . Ogden Knifnii, 
to advertising director and manager 
of New Products division of Color- 
forms, toy manufacturers . . . Arthur 
Rosengarten, appointed Western 
regional sales manager for Ronson. 



AGENCIES 



Another industry group has been 

formed on Michigan Avenue: 
The Agency Broadcast Producers 

Workshop — the first organizations 
in Chicago limited entirely to agenc) 
producers. Their purpose is much the 
same as the media buyers who 
formed last week. (See 21 January 
SPONSOR-SCOPE.) 

At their first meeting held this past 
Wednesday (28), they discussed a 
new method of infra-red photography 
developed by MPO Productions, New 
York. 

More about new groups being 
formed : The Hollywood Advertising 
Glub is sponsoring the first annual 
Broadcast Advertising Clinic, to 

be held 9 February at the Hollywood 
Roosevelt Hotel, and cover: creativ- 
ity; tv commercial techniques; and 
how to buy tv and radio more effec- 
tively. ... A new agency network 
devoted to heavy 7 emphasis on ex- 



-P*£ 





Getting into the sports act: Personalities at WIIC, Pittsburgh, 
pose after their "basketball" game with WCAE at half-time during 
the University of Pittsburgh — Carnegie Tech annual basketball tilt 



Second group in the hasketball act: This time, KDKA, in Pitts- 

burgh, played WCAE during half-time, and even in hula skill-. 
proved "no great shakes." Final score of their game: 99-99 



Sports, this time for real: Pat Summerall (center), N. Y. Giant 
will air show on W-GRO, Lake City, Fla. With him (1 to r) Bill 
McDufne, sponsor; Bob Dobelstein, sis. mgr. ; Ray Starr, gen. mgr. 




Back to the basketball front: Newsmen and d.j.'s of WHLL, 
Wheeling, played against a group in Tiltonsville, Ohio before some 
1,000 people, adding S625 to the High Boosters Club's treasury 




h w 



changing creative ideas and market- 
ing services is now in the process of 
being formed by Raymond Rosen- 
berg, president of Yardis Advertising, 
Philadelphia. Tentative name: Mar- 
keting Association of North 
America. Purpose: A network of 
medium-sized agencies ($500,000 to 
$1.5 million billing bracket) to meet 
and exchange ideas. 

Agency appointments: E. & J. 

Gallo Winery, from DDB back to 
BBDO, where the account was from 
1950-55 . . . Revlon, for its "Eye- 
Fresh", to Warwick & Legler . . . 
Wershaw-Gould Co., toy manufac- 
turers' reps, to Product Services, 
Inc. . . . Brand Owners Cooperative 
Association, marketers of wine, to 
Weiss & Geller . . . Lumber & 
Builders Supply Co. to Armstrong, 
Fenton & Vinson, San Diego . . . 
XETV, Tijuana, to Heintz & Co. 
. . . The Solvents & Chemicals Group, 
from Edward H. Weiss & Co., to 
Stern, Walters & Simmons, Chi- 
cago . . . The B. C. Remedy Co., from 
N. W. Ayer to C. Knox Massey & 
Associates, Durham, N. C. 

Account resignation: C. H. Mas- 
land & Sons, carpet manufacturers, 
by Anderson & Cairns. 

Thisa 'n' data: Ralph Head, v. p. 

and director of marketing at BBDO 
will conduct 12 marketing seminars 
this spring at New York University 
. . . Joan Ellis Shatkin, publicity 
and public relations director of the 
Ellis Advertising Co., Buffalo, listed 
in Who's Who of American Women 
. . . Michael Winow, production 
manager at Ogilvy, Benson & Mather 
and the first man hired there when 
the agency formed in 1948, honored 
on his 10th anniversary with 0,B&M. 

Personnel apointments : Richard 
Cummins, creative chief of EWR&R 
. . . Reginald Dellow, to v.p. in the 
Chicago office of Grant Advertising 
. . . William Gillen, to assistant to 
the president and Wayne Tiss, suc- 
ceeding him as v.p. in Chicago office 
at BBDO . . . Frank Armstrong, 
president of Sales Communications, 
named v.p. of McCann-Erickson . . . 
George Poris, to v.p. of SSC&B . . . 
Dale Anderson, to v.p. and account 
supervisor at Compton . . . Charles 
Wolfe, creative director and V. C. 
Kenney, v.p. in charge of creative 



60 



services at The Griswold-Eshleman 
Co. . . . Four new board members 
at Grey Advertising: Leroy Block, 
Hal Davis, Dr. E. L. Deckinger 
and Theodore Kaufman. 

More news from the personnel 
front: 

Wright Nodine, to account super- 
visor at Geyer, Morey, Madden & Bal- 
lard . . . C. Richard Fornoff, to the 
account service division of Mar- 
schalk & Pratt . . . Richard Olanoff , 
to the creative services staff at Feigen- 
baum & Werman, Philadelphia . . . 
H. Truman Rice, account executive 
in the radio/tv department, Ketchum, 
MacLeod & Grove . . . Jack Brussel, 
account supervisor and director of 
client service, C&W, Detroit . . . Dick 
Meads, to the Dick Knoth Advertis- 
ing Agency, San Diego . . . James 
Hayes, to a public relations account 
executive at BBDO . . . Hubert 
Sweet, to the New York office of 
Doremus & Co. as director of broad- 
cast media. 



FILM 



The importance of international 
program sources and foreign 
markets to the tv film industry 
was underlined last week by 
NTA's creation of a new division, 
NTA International Inc. 

Under Harold Goldman as presi- 
dent, the new division will: 

• Handle all tv film and theatrical 
film sales abroad via ten offices. 

• Negotiate foreign co-production 
with the BBC and with other sources. 

• Also handle all feature film 
booking to theatres and tv in the U. S. 

Organizational move : Telestar 
Films will now operate under name 
of its president, Bernard L. Schubert. 

Production notes: Film Radio 
of Hollywood planning three new tv 
series on the Bible, music and sports 
. . . Film Clinic of New York offering 
new post-production film services. 

Promotions: WNTA-TV took ad- 
vantage of armed forces cooperation 
to promote premiere of Citizen Sol- 
dier. 

Commercials : Stero commercials 
being delivered by Tele-Sound of 
Washington, D. C. ... Fred 



Raphael leaves JWT to become 
client relations manager for Video- 
tape Productions . . . Don Gilman 
named art director for Filmways . . . 
Playhouse Pictures reports 11% 
rise in 1958 commercials production 
. . . Bob Ganon becomes v.p. and 
general manager of TV Spots . . . 
Len Levy is new chief executive of 
Robert Lawrence office in Chicago . . . 
Music Makers make sound track for 
Ford and Thorn McCann commercials. 

Strictly personnel: Ziv appoints 
James Weathers as general man- 
ager of World Broadcasting and 
Robert Klein as Pittsburgh account 
executive in syndication . . . George 
Gruskin has formed his own crea- 
tive consultation office . . . WPIX 
names John A. Patterson v.p. and 
sales manager and Alida Mesrop as 
publicity manager . . . William A. 
Cornish is appointed national sales 
director for Flamingo . . . Kurt 
Blumberg joins UA-TV as admini- 
strative assistant to executive v.p. 
Bruce Eells . . . Melvin Danheiser 
joins NTA's foreign sta